Equal Women Reshape American Law

Fred Strebeigh
W.W. Norton & Company
February 2009
ISBN: 978-0-393-06555-8

The dramatic, untold story of how women battled blatant inequities in America’s legal system.

As late as 1967, men outnumbered women twenty to one in American law schools. With the loss of deferments from Vietnam, law schools admitted women to avoid plummeting enrollments. As women entered, the law resisted. Judges would not hire women. Law firms asserted a right to discriminate against women. Judges permitted discrimination against pregnant women. Courts viewed sexual harassment as, one judge said, “a game played by the male superiors.” Against the odds, women fought to reshape the law. Fred Strebeigh has interviewed litigators, plaintiffs, and judges, including Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Catharine MacKinnon, and has done research in their private archives as well as those of other attorneys who took cases to the Supreme Court to make the law equal and just for all.