Courses

Professor: Heather Klemann

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture. The titles and descriptions for individual sections are forthcoming.

Section 01 - Heather Klemann MW 11.35-12.50
Section 02 - Jordan Brower MW 11.35-12.50
Section 03 - Andrew Brown TTh 1.00-2.15
Section 04 - Janice Carlisle MW 1.00-2.15
Section 05 - Margaret Deli TTh 2.30-3.45
Section 06 - Michael Gibbons MW 9.00-10.15
Section 07 - Jami Carlacio MW 2.30-3.45
Section 08 - Briallen Hopper TTh 2.30-3.45
Section 09 - Annie Killian TTh 1.00-2.15
Section 10 - Andrew Willson TTh 4.00-5.15
Section 11 - Timothy Kreiner TTh 11.35-12.50
Section 12 - Igor DeSouza MW 1.00-2.15
Section 13 - Bofang Li TTh 1.00-2.15
Section 14 - Bofang Li TTh 4.00-5.15
Section 15 - Katja Lindskog TTh 9.00-10.15
Section 16 - Katja Lindskog TTh 11.35-12.50
Section 17 - Scarlet Luk MW 1.00-2.15
Section 18 - Yahel Matalon MW 2.30-3.45
Section 19 - Pamela Newton MW 1.00-2.15
Section 20 - Jordan Brower MW 2.30-3.45
Section 21 - Shannon Beddingfield MW 11.35-12.50
Section 22 - Alexandra Reider TTh 1.00-2.15
Section 23 - Timothy Robinson TTh 2.30-3.45
Section 24 - Jami Carlaci MW 11.35-12.50
Section 25 - Joseph Stadolni WF 11.35-12.50
Section 26 - Barbara Stuart TTh 11.35-12.50
Section 27 - J. Antonio Templanza MW 1.00-2.15
Section 28 - Emily Ulrich TTh 11.35-12.50
Section 29 - J. Antonio Templanza MW 4.00-5.15
Section 30 - Timothy Kreiner TTh 2.30-3.45

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.  The titles, times, and descriptions are forthcoming.

Section 01 - Ryan Wepler MW 11.35-12.50
Section 02 - Gina Hurley TTh 11.35-12.50
Section 03 - Timothy Kreiner MW 2.30-3.45
Section 04 - Katherine Hindley TTh 2.30-3.45

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.  The titles, times, and descriptions are forthcoming.

Section 01 - Andrew Ehrgood MW 1.00-2.15
Section 02 - Kim Shirkhani TTh 9.00-10.15
Section 03 - David Gorin TTh 1.00-2.15
Section 04 - Andrew Willson MW 11.35-12.50
Section 05 - Briallen Hopper TTh 11.35-12.50
Section 06 - Adam Sexton TTh 2.30-3.45
Section 07 - Pamela Newton MW 2.30-3.45
Section 08 - Mark Oppenheimer MW 9.00-10.15
Section 09 - Palmer Rampell TTh 1.00-2.15
Section 10 - Shifra Sharlin MW 11.35-12.50
Section 11 - Shifra Sharlin MW 1.00-2.15
Section 12 - Kim Shirkhani TTh 11.35-12.50  
Section 13 - Barbara Stuart TTh 2.30-3.45

TTh 11.35-12.50
Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing. 

Section 01 - Jessica Brantley TTh 1.00-2.35
Section 02 - Lawrence Manley TTh 1.00-2.35
Section 03 - Alastair Minnis TTh 11.35-12.50
Section 04 - Alastair Minnis TTh 2.30-3.45
Section 05 - Catherine Nicholson TTh 11.35-12.50

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Ellison, Baldwin, McKay, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Bishop, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, Rankine, E. P. Jones.

Section 01 - Sunny Xiang MW 11.35-12.50
Section 02 - Sunny Xiang MW 9.00-10.15
Section 03 - Jacqueline Goldsby TTh 9.00-10.15
Section 04 - Brandon Menke MW 2.30-3.45

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.  The times and expanded description are forthcoming.

Section 01 - Timothy Robinson
Section 02 - Tara Menon
Section 03 - Brad Holden

Also LITR 129.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
T 2:30pm-4:30pm

An introduction to reading and writing poetry. Classic examples from Shakespeare and Milton, the modernist poetics of Stein, Pound, Moore, and Stevens, and recent work in a variety of forms and traditions. Students develop a portfolio of poems and write an essay on the poetic craft of poets who have influenced their work.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome.

No advance application is required for this course.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: John Crowley
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review. Prerequisite: a previous course in English or in another literature.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review. Prerequisite: a previous course in English or in another literature.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Instructor:
Amity Gaige

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Louise Glück
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar workshop for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Yale. Preference given to freshmen and sophomores.

Admission to writing courses is by application and is based chiefly on work submitted by the student.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: Please also submit your application in hard copy to the English Department office, LC 107. Students should submit a sample of their own work, if it exists; in addition, all applicants should submit a paragraph on a literary work of any kind, any period: the choice should reflect personal admiration.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

A workshop on journalistic strategies for looking at and writing about contemporary paintings of the human figure. Practitioners and theorists of figurative painting; controversies, partisans, and opponents. Includes field trips to museums and galleries in New York City.

No advance application is required for this course.

Also HSAR 460.

Creative Writing
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

A seminar and workshop in writing about the human body in motion, with a focus on the art of dance. Close reading of exemplary dance writing from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The challenges and possibilities of writing artfully about nonverbal expression. Students use a variety of approaches to write about dance and other performance genres.

Prerequisites: No previous knowledge of dance required.

No advance application required. A brief statement of interest will be requested in the first class.

Also THST 244.

About the Instructor: Brian Seibert is a dance critic for the New York Times and just published a book called What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing. The course will not draw exclusively on dance writers, but include poets, novelists, and theorists, as well.

Creative Writing
WR, HU
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: J. D. McClatchy
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

A study of the writing of verse through a consideration of its use in a range of poems and through weekly assignments.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Donald Margulies
T 2:30pm-5:00pm

A seminar and workshop in writing for the stage. Readings include modern American and British plays by Pinter, Mamet, Churchill, Kushner, Williams, and Wilder. Emphasis on play structure, character, and conflict. In addition to weekly exercises, students write a one-act play.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: Your Writing Sample may be in any genre; there is no limit to the length of your Statement of Purpose.

Also THST 320.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016

A nonfiction workshop, confronting the challenges of journalism as an art. Emphasis on voice and structure. Study of texts that may suggest modes, voices, forms, and styles for nonfiction pieces. Frequent writing projects and revisions.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: to come.

Instructor:
Sarah Stillman
 

Creative Writing
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Louise Glück
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

A seminar and workshop in the writing of verse. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: Please also submit your application form, Writing Sample, and Statement of Purpose in hard copy to the English Department office, LC 107.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Caryl Phillips
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Cynthia Zarin
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar and workshop in the contemporary essay. Public versus private voice, the responsibilities of the essayist, and the evolution of writing in the first person. Readings include essays by Joan Didion, Jonathan Lethem, Jenny Diski, Zadie Smith, M. F. K. Fisher, Bruce Chatwin, John Berger, and Oliver Sacks.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: Please also submit your application form, Writing Sample, and Statement of Purpose in hard copy to the English Department office, LC 107.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Steven Brill
M 9:00-10:50

ENGLISH 467A: JOURNALISM
Steven Brill ● sb@brillbusiness.com ● (212) 332-6301
Fall 2016

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar – the core course for Yale Journalism Scholars – is for those interested in understanding the changing role of journalism, in coming to grips with the challenges and opportunities related to the business model of journalism in a digital, global age, and in learning the practice of journalism. Grades will be based on participation and written work, with an emphasis on the final project.

An emphasis will be placed on both imaginative and critical thinking as it applies to reporting and to creating ways and forms of telling a story so that it has maximum impact in a world cluttered with media and experiencing profound challenges to making journalism economically viable.

One or perhaps two extra (and voluntary) sessions will take place in New York City, so that students can meet with working journalists there.

I will meet with each student individually during the term as often as necessary in order to provide feedback, help with the final project, and (if requested) provide career guidance.

Guest instructors during two of the sessions will be Bob Woodward and Gay Talese.

Successful completion of this course and other aspects of the Yale Journalism Scholars program will qualify students to be designated Yale Journalism Scholars. For more information on the Yale Journalism Scholars and the Yale Journalism Initiative, see http://www.yale.edu/writing/journalism.
 
INSTRUCTOR:  Steven Brill, a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School, worked as a writer for New York Magazine, Esquire, and Harpers while in Law School. In 1978 he was the author of a best-selling book on the Teamsters Union. A year later, he launched The American Lawyer Magazine and later expanded it into ten legal publications across the country. In 1991 Brill launched Court TV and, in 1998, Brill’s Content Magazine. In 2002, Brill wrote a series of columns in Newsweek about America’s response to September 11, as well as After: The Rebuilding and Defending of America in the September 12 Era, which was published in 2003 by Simon & Schuster. In 2009, he founded Journalism Online, LLC, to enable newspapers, magazines, and online publishers to earn revenue from the journalism they publish online. In the last four years he has also written feature articles for The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, and TIME. In 2011, he wrote Class Warfare: Inside the Fight To Fix America’s Schools. He is also a weekly columnist for Reuters. In 2013, he authored a special edition of TIME Magazine – “Bitter Pill: How Medical Bills Are Killing Us” – about healthcare prices and profits. His book about American healthcare and the fight over Obamacare was published in early 2015 by Random House. His serialized story published in The Huffington Post in 2015 of how a major drug company marketed an anti-psychotic drug illegally to children and the elderly – “America’s Most Admired Law Breaker” – is being developed as a television series.

MEETINGS:  Mondays, 9:00 – 10:50 a.m. in LC 103

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS:  The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. In general, we are looking for a range of students – some with demonstrated commitment to and experience in journalism, others without that background but who can write well, want to learn, and perhaps have an added dimension to offer in class discussions (such as an intense interest in politics, the arts, law, or economics), which they might want to apply to journalism.

Admission:

Each student must submit the following simple, two-part application package to sb@brillbusiness.com. I prefer that you submit the package by the evening of Monday, September 5, 2016.

If you want to submit your application earlier, you can submit it any time after August 15 – and in some cases I will admit students early who do so. If there are 15 well qualified applicants from among those applying early, I will send notice that the application process has closed as soon as it has.

However, if you first want to visit the introductory class on Friday, September 2 (which is the substitute for the regular Monday class because of Labor Day), that is fine.

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN by 11:59 PM on Monday, September 5.  I will post with the English Department the final list of those accepted by Wednesday, September 7, if not earlier.

The two-part application should consist of:

1.    No more than two double-spaced pages: A written statement explaining your interest in the class and in the Yale Journalism Scholars program. This should also include your Yale class year, any previous writing courses that you have taken, a brief description of your extra-curricular activities and a description of your journalism experience.

2.    One writing sample – either an article that you have published in an on- or off- campus publication or something that you submitted for a class.

READINGS:  The syllabus provides an outline of what we will cover in the course.  The course packet is available at TYCO, and all books are available at the Yale bookstore. Most of the reading will be from the “Other Reading” materials described below, supplemented by these books:

BOOKS:  John Hersey, Hiroshima
             James Stewart, Follow the Story: How to Write Successful Non-Fiction
             Gay Talese, The Gay Talese Reader
             Steven Brill, America’s Bitter Pill – to be handed out in class.

OTHER READING:

Various newspaper articles, magazine pieces and online postings intended to illustrate different forms and methods (and successes and failures of) journalism, ranging from Woodward and Bernstein’s original Watergate reporting, to celebrity profiles, to bulletins on Supreme Court decisions, to data-centric journalism at ProPublica. (All assembled in the course packet.)

ASSIGNMENTS:

•    Biographical profile – 2,000 words – of the person sitting next to you in this seminar.
•    Critiquing and editing of several published articles from time to time.
•    Coming to class with one original story idea every other week.
•    Filing three online reports and one final report in one day (that you pick) about a story unfolding on the Yale campus.
•    Writing a two-page strategic outline for an interview with a potentially hostile source.
•    Creating, with two partners, a viable path for one of the three students in the group for a career in journalism.
•    Final Assignment: 3,500-4,000 word publishable magazine (or e-magazine) feature story or three-part newspaper series – to be edited by one of your classmates before final submission to me.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: Because we will regularly discuss current journalism, all participants in the program should be prepared to bring a laptop or tablet to class.

OUTLINE OF READING AND ASSIGNMENTS
September 2, 2016: Introduction: In-class discussion of what the seminar will attempt to do and what is expected of participants.

Application for admission to class WILL THEN BE due September 5, 2016 by 11:59 pm, unless applications have already closed.

Admission decisions will be distributed by email by September 7, 2016 at the latest. Please complete the reading for September 12, 2016 before the class.
 _____________________________________________________________________________

Printable version

SYLLABUS

Also PLSC 253.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Steven Brill
M 9:00-10:50

ENGLISH 467A: JOURNALISM
Steven Brill ● sb@brillbusiness.com ● (212) 332-6301
Fall 2016

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar – the core course for Yale Journalism Scholars – is for those interested in understanding the changing role of journalism, in coming to grips with the challenges and opportunities related to the business model of journalism in a digital, global age, and in learning the practice of journalism. Grades will be based on participation and written work, with an emphasis on the final project.

An emphasis will be placed on both imaginative and critical thinking as it applies to reporting and to creating ways and forms of telling a story so that it has maximum impact in a world cluttered with media and experiencing profound challenges to making journalism economically viable.

One or perhaps two extra (and voluntary) sessions will take place in New York City, so that students can meet with working journalists there.

I will meet with each student individually during the term as often as necessary in order to provide feedback, help with the final project, and (if requested) provide career guidance.

Guest instructors during two of the sessions will be Bob Woodward and Gay Talese.

Successful completion of this course and other aspects of the Yale Journalism Scholars program will qualify students to be designated Yale Journalism Scholars. For more information on the Yale Journalism Scholars and the Yale Journalism Initiative, see http://www.yale.edu/writing/journalism.
 
INSTRUCTOR:  Steven Brill, a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School, worked as a writer for New York Magazine, Esquire, and Harpers while in Law School. In 1978 he was the author of a best-selling book on the Teamsters Union. A year later, he launched The American Lawyer Magazine and later expanded it into ten legal publications across the country. In 1991 Brill launched Court TV and, in 1998, Brill’s Content Magazine. In 2002, Brill wrote a series of columns in Newsweek about America’s response to September 11, as well as After: The Rebuilding and Defending of America in the September 12 Era, which was published in 2003 by Simon & Schuster. In 2009, he founded Journalism Online, LLC, to enable newspapers, magazines, and online publishers to earn revenue from the journalism they publish online. In the last four years he has also written feature articles for The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, and TIME. In 2011, he wrote Class Warfare: Inside the Fight To Fix America’s Schools. He is also a weekly columnist for Reuters. In 2013, he authored a special edition of TIME Magazine – “Bitter Pill: How Medical Bills Are Killing Us” – about healthcare prices and profits. His book about American healthcare and the fight over Obamacare was published in early 2015 by Random House. His serialized story published in The Huffington Post in 2015 of how a major drug company marketed an anti-psychotic drug illegally to children and the elderly – “America’s Most Admired Law Breaker” – is being developed as a television series.

MEETINGS:  Mondays, 9:00 – 10:50 a.m. in LC 103

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS:  The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. In general, we are looking for a range of students – some with demonstrated commitment to and experience in journalism, others without that background but who can write well, want to learn, and perhaps have an added dimension to offer in class discussions (such as an intense interest in politics, the arts, law, or economics), which they might want to apply to journalism.

Admission:

Each student must submit the following simple, two-part application package to sb@brillbusiness.com. I prefer that you submit the package by the evening of Monday, September 5, 2016.

If you want to submit your application earlier, you can submit it any time after August 15 – and in some cases I will admit students early who do so. If there are 15 well qualified applicants from among those applying early, I will send notice that the application process has closed as soon as it has.

However, if you first want to visit the introductory class on Friday, September 2 (which is the substitute for the regular Monday class because of Labor Day), that is fine.

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN by 11:59 PM on Monday, September 5.  I will post with the English Department the final list of those accepted by Wednesday, September 7, if not earlier.

The two-part application should consist of:

1.    No more than two double-spaced pages: A written statement explaining your interest in the class and in the Yale Journalism Scholars program. This should also include your Yale class year, any previous writing courses that you have taken, a brief description of your extra-curricular activities and a description of your journalism experience.

2.    One writing sample – either an article that you have published in an on- or off- campus publication or something that you submitted for a class.

READINGS:  The syllabus provides an outline of what we will cover in the course.  The course packet is available at TYCO, and all books are available at the Yale bookstore. Most of the reading will be from the “Other Reading” materials described below, supplemented by these books:

BOOKS:  John Hersey, Hiroshima
             James Stewart, Follow the Story: How to Write Successful Non-Fiction
             Gay Talese, The Gay Talese Reader
             Steven Brill, America’s Bitter Pill – to be handed out in class.

OTHER READING:

Various newspaper articles, magazine pieces and online postings intended to illustrate different forms and methods (and successes and failures of) journalism, ranging from Woodward and Bernstein’s original Watergate reporting, to celebrity profiles, to bulletins on Supreme Court decisions, to data-centric journalism at ProPublica. (All assembled in the course packet.)

ASSIGNMENTS:

•    Biographical profile – 2,000 words – of the person sitting next to you in this seminar.
•    Critiquing and editing of several published articles from time to time.
•    Coming to class with one original story idea every other week.
•    Filing three online reports and one final report in one day (that you pick) about a story unfolding on the Yale campus.
•    Writing a two-page strategic outline for an interview with a potentially hostile source.
•    Creating, with two partners, a viable path for one of the three students in the group for a career in journalism.
•    Final Assignment: 3,500-4,000 word publishable magazine (or e-magazine) feature story or three-part newspaper series – to be edited by one of your classmates before final submission to me.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: Because we will regularly discuss current journalism, all participants in the program should be prepared to bring a laptop or tablet to class.

OUTLINE OF READING AND ASSIGNMENTS
September 2, 2016: Introduction: In-class discussion of what the seminar will attempt to do and what is expected of participants.

Application for admission to class WILL THEN BE due September 5, 2016 by 11:59 pm, unless applications have already closed.

Admission decisions will be distributed by email by September 7, 2016 at the latest. Please complete the reading for September 12, 2016 before the class.
 _____________________________________________________________________________

Printable version

SYLLABUS

Also PLSC 253.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Anne Fadiman
Th 2:30-5:20

A seminar and workshop with the theme “At Home in America.” Students consider the varied ways in which modern American literary journalists write about place, and address the theme themselves in both reportorial and first-person work.

Please read the description below, paying special attention to sections highlighted in bold, some of which describe exceptions to the standard application procedure.

The purpose of this course is to examine and attempt good nonfiction writing through the microcosm of setting. How do we see America (whether urban or rural, east or west, rich or poor) as home? We will attempt to dismantle some of the traditional barriers between academic reading and pleasure reading as we discuss works by Joan Didion, Ian Frazier, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, John McPhee, Gay Talese, and others. Students will write four pieces (two first-person, two reportorial), the last of which is a substantial profile reported in New Haven, outside the Yale campus, on someone found in the Greater New Haven Yellow Pages. They will also critique each other’s work both orally and via email. Each student will have at least six individual conferences with me, most of them an hour long, to discuss and edit his or her work.

Students who wish to apply to English 469 should submit the standard Application for Writing Courses to the Drop Box of the English Student Resources site on Classes*v2 by noon on Wednesday, August 17. Please note the following special instructions for English 469 applications:

1. The standard application specifies “a” writing sample. Ignore that! I can assess your work better if you submit two samples, totaling 5-15 pages. (If the total length exceeds that, please mark the sections to which I should pay particular attention.) You may even submit three if one is very short (for instance, a Daily Themes one-pager).

2. If possible, your samples should belong to the same genre we’ll be reading and writing (“non-non”–nonacademic nonfiction). Essays, literary journalism, and personal essays would all be appropriate. (If fiction is your strength, one but not both of your samples may be a short story. Similarly, if you’re a playwright, one sample may be a scene from a play. The other sample should be non-non.) Be sure to choose pieces that give your literary style a thorough airing.

3. Your “statement of purpose” should be a note that explains some things your samples won’t tell me. The application suggests “a short paragraph,” but you are welcome to write as long a note as you wish. For instance: Why do you want to take the class? What would you contribute to it? What writing experience and honors have you accumulated? (I’ll still consider you if the answer is None and None.) What are you majoring in? (English majors will receive no special preference.) Is there anything else that might help me understand you as a writer or a person?

4. When you list the writing classes you’ve taken, please include the class’s name and instructor, not just its number.

Once English 469 is up on Classesv2, the site will have a bit more information at the bottom of the course description, including the names of former students who have offered to answer questions about the class.

Creative Writing
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

A workshop that explores the sentence as the basic unit of writing and the smallest unit of perception. The importance of the sentence itself versus that of form or genre. Writing as an act of discovery. Includes weekly writing assignments. Not open to freshmen.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016

Special projects set up by the student in an area of particular interest with the help of a faculty adviser and the director of undergraduate studies, intended to enable the student to cover material not otherwise offered by the department. The course may be used for research or for directed reading, but in either case a term paper or its equivalent is normally required. The student meets regularly with the faculty adviser. To apply for admission, a student must submit an application and prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the office of the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Special projects set up by the student in an area of particular interest with the help of a faculty adviser and the director of undergraduate studies, intended to enable the student to cover material not otherwise offered by the department. The course may be used for research or for directed reading, but in either case a term paper or its equivalent is normally required. The student meets regularly with the faculty adviser. To apply for admission, a student must submit an application and prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the office of the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Second term of the optional yearlong senior essay. Students may begin the yearlong essay in the spring term of the junior year, allowing for significant summer research, with permission of the instructor. After ENGL 490.

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016

Second term of the optional yearlong senior essay. Students may begin the yearlong essay in the spring term of the junior year, allowing for significant summer research, with permission of the instructor. After ENGL 490.

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Professor: Roberta Frank
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

The essentials of the language, some prose readings, and close study of several celebrated Old English poems.

Also LING 500.

Graduate Seminars
Medieval Lit
Term: Fall
2016
W 9.25am-11.15am

Using modern postcolonial as well as medieval theories of translation, memory, and bilingualism we will explore how texts are transformed, cited and re-invented in the medieval period. What happens to language under the pressure of crosslingual reading practices?  How can the freedom and inventiveness of medieval poetic practices illuminate modern theories of translation?  Texts include material in French, English, Latin, and Italian. Proficiency in any one or more of these languages is welcome, but every effort will be made to use texts available in modern English translation, so as to include as wide a participation as possible in the course. 

Also CPLT 582/FREN 802

Graduate Seminars
Medieval Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: David Quint
T 10:20-12:20

2016 marks the 500th anniversary of the Orlando furioso and the 400th anniversary of the death of Cervantes. This course will read the Orlando furioso, Ariosto’s Cinque canti, and Don Quijote as depictions of the crisis of chivalry, and it will chart, in the case of Don Quijote, the birth of the modern novel. It will examine the use in these works of mirroring episodes – entrelacement – and of interpolated tales. It also looks at similar techniques in Apuleius’s The Golden Ass, in the Thousand and One Nights, and in Sir Philip Sidney’s New Arcadia.

Also CPLT 670.

Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
2016
Th 1.30pm-3.20pm

This course has two complementary, though sometimes divergent, objects of interest: the first is the poetry of Edmund Spenser, particularly his immense allegorical epic-romance, The Faerie Queene; the second is that poem’s varied and often vexed reception history, from the late sixteenth century through the present. The Faerie Queene is a poem about interpretation–its pleasures and its discontents–and we often find ourselves reading over the shoulders of readers in the poem. But it’s also possible to read the poem through the eyes of other historical readers, adopting their (often alien) expectations, ambitions, and preoccupations as a way of discovering new things in the text and of reflecting on the biases and assumptions of our own critical practices.  In this sense, this will be a course about readerly methods and the history of reading as well as a course about Spenser, and I warmly welcome participants whose primary interests lie outside the English Renaissance. 

Graduate Seminars
Early Modern
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: John Rogers
Th 1.30pm-3.20pm

A survey of seventeenth-century poetry and prose, exclusive of Milton. Authors include Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Herbert, Browne, Crashaw, Marvell, Cavendish, Bunyan, and Dryden. 

Graduate Seminars
Early Modern
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Paul Fry
Th 10.30am-12.20pm

Poetry and prose of Byron, Shelley, and Keats with emphasis on both their differences and their common qualities. Special attention is given to the complex interactions of these poets with Wordsworth and Coleridge. 

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: David Bromwich
Th 1.30pm-3.20pm

Intensive survey of British literature from the depression to the Cold War. We begin with the later writings of Lawrence and Yeats, and end with John Osborne and Thom Gunn, allowing for particular attention to the careers of Orwell and Auden. Among the other assigned authors: Woolf, MacDiarmid, Churchill, Gandhi, Isherwood, Bowen, Amis, Larkin, Hughes, Greene, and Green; along with films by Michael Powell, Carol Reed, and Tony Richardson.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st Century Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Daphne Brooks
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

An exploration of sonic theory and the African American literary tradition from the nineteenth century through the millennium with special emphasis on major debates in jazz studies and a critical (re)examination of blues ideologies, as well as the politics and poetics of spirituals, R&B and soul, funk, Afrofuturism, punk, pop, and hip-hop. The course places the work of a range of cultural theorists (Douglass, DuBois, Adorno, Hurston, Ellison, Murray, Baraka, Mackey, Carby, Spillers, O’Meally, Griffin, Moten, Edwards, Radano, Nancy, Szendy, Perry, Weheliye, etc.) in conversation with key texts and epochs in black letters.

Also AFAM 514a/AMST 735

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st Century Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: R. John Williams
W 3.30pm-5.20pm

This course examines transformations in temporality that occurred in the sciences and arts during the twentieth century.  From the arrival of Einsteinian relativity to more contemporary proofs on quantum non-locality, the question of time in the twentieth century threatened to overturn some of our oldest assumptions about cause and effect, duration, history, presentness, and futurity. These new temporalities were as scientifically and philosophically vexing as they were rife with spiritual and aesthetic possibility–a dynamic reflected in the literary and artistic forms that were central to these transformations.  Our reading will reflect this deeply crosscultural and interdisciplinary trajectory, including histories of science and technology (Peter Galison, N. Katherine Hayles, David Kaiser), philosophies of time (Heidegger, Bruno Latour, Bernard Stiegler, McLuhan, Luhmann), critical theories of temporal form (Derrida, Adorno, Jameson, Pamela Lee, Kojin Karatani), a wide array of literary texts (William Burroughs, Thomas Pynchon, Ursula K. Le Guin, Tom McCarthy, and others) as well as important cinematic innovations (Jodorowsky, Godard, Kubrick).  Central to our investigation will be questions such as, What is the “time” of literature? What is the “time” of film? How does art transform or reinforce theories of temporal flow? How do new technologies of composition and circulation alter the temporal effects of a given work? What was the “End of History”? Coursework will include discussion, an in-class presentation, and either an extensive annotated bibliography or final paper.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st Century Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Tavia Nyong'o
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

This graduate seminar will trace the emergence of affect, sense, feeling, and mood as critical keywords in American Studies. Particular attention will be paid to the manner in which queer theorists such as Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Lauren Berlant, Ann Cvetkovich, Heather Love, Jennifer Doyle, Jonathan Flatley, and José Esteban Muñoz developed the concept in what has been called “the affective turn” in queer and feminist aesthetics. The philosophical basis of affect theory in the writings of Spinoza, Heidegger, and Deleuze will form the core of the seminar. We will also look to an alternate genealogy for affect politics in the writings of Bergson and Deleuze on fabulation. We will consider the psychoanalytic take on affect, in particular, the object relations school of Klein and Winnicott, and we will read critics who contrast affect theory with trauma theory. Marxist contributions to affect theory will include readings from Virno (on humor), Hardt and Negri (on affective labor), and Ranciere (on the distribution of the sensible). The writings of Jasbir Puar and Brian Massumi on the affective politics of contemporary war, empire, and societies of control will also be considered, as will writings by Fred Moten, Saidiya Hartman, and Frank Wilderson on optimism and pessimism as moods/modalities of black studies. 

Also AFAM 775/AMST 771

Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
2016

Designed to help fill gaps in students programs when there are corresponding gaps in the department’s offerings. By arrangement with faculty and with the approval of the DGS.

Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
2016