Courses

MW 11.35pm-12.50pm

Close study of Austen’s novels, with special attention to the critique of social and literary convention. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online Freshman Seminar preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Freshman Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: David Kastan
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

It is on the pillars of the four major tragedies that Shakespeare’s reputation most firmly rests. The seminar is designed to explore these four plays in detail, trying to see what makes them great in the way that almost all readers and audiences have recognized. We will think about them as plays to be performed, as drama to be read, and as texts that have been constructed by the activities of various people, Shakespeare of course the first among them. And we will think about them as plays deeply embedded in the history of their own moment, as well as in later histories, which they in some part are responsible for.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online Freshman Seminar preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Freshman Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Joseph Gordon
TTh 11.35pm-12.50pm

Close reading of novels, memoirs, and journalism from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to understand how certain novelists have set about to rework fiction and nonfiction source materials to create new narrative. The significance of such artistic means as revising the setting, altering or questioning gender identity or sexual orientation of characters, or shifting the historical moment or political framework of the action. Exploration of how new works dispose the reader to reinterpret earlier works, providing a basis for redefining what constitutes originality in writing fiction. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online Freshman Seminar preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Readings include:

Alice Munro, “Home” (2 versions)

Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea

Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway and Michael Cunningham, The Hours

Shakespeare, Othello, Verdi and Boito, Otello (opera), Q Brothers, Othello: The Remix (hip hop performance piece)

Freud, Five Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis, and A. Anatoli Kuznetsov, Babi Yar: A Documentary in the Form of a Novel, D.M. Thomas, The White Hotel

Freshman Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
MW 9.00am-10.15am

“Everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it.” This saying, often attributed to Mark Twain (incorrectly, as it happens) may no longer hold in a historical moment in which human activity is radically changing the atmosphere. The ways we talk, and what we do, about weather have changed radically in the past two centuries, and even more recently with the rising awareness of potentially irreversible climate change. The sky is once again, as it was anciently, a screen for reading human destiny, especially in an age in which we call online data-centers by the name “the cloud.”

Despite its reputation as boring and mundane, which is probably a modern invention, weather has been a source of enduring fascination for humans, a topic of endless richness for sketching mood and narrative, and a phenomenon that has invited rich scientific and technical exploration. This class builds on the idea that weather is an elemental medium of human life and that studies of such media should be interdisciplinary across domains of imaginative endeavor, including literature and science, philosophy and religion, painting and popular culture. This class will be an interdisciplinary adventure in atmospheric thinking and an effort to come to terms with the stories we tell about, and with, the temperamental and nebulous materials of weather. An open mind and eager imagination are requirements for studying the diversity of meanings that the weather can hold.

We will start with a quick look at the long history of how weather has figured as a medium for dramatic comment on the human condition in the Bible, the ancient Greeks and Romans, and Shakespeare, and then focus more closely on the past two centuries, which have seen radical changes in the ways that human beings craft the weather, both materially and imaginatively. One challenge for this class is that the selection of potential materials is endlessly rich. In some ways, weather seems one of the primary, if not the primary, topic of literature. The Bible, The Canterbury Tales, The Tempest, and The Waste Land—to pick a few highpoints at random—all start with meteorological phenomena. Indeed, the problem of abundance will nag at us, since almost every form of imaginative writing deals with atmospheric phenomena in one way or the other. One task for the class will be to compile relevant examples and to figure out how to sort out the vast archive of weather-friendly writing. The readings on the syllabus are often chosen as highlights or useful examples, not as comprehensive or necessarily canonical. We will focus largely on England and North America but range elsewhere at times as well. Our materials will be plays, poems, paintings, stories, songs, essays, and scholarly research. One obvious gap will be the novel. Dickens’ Bleak House, Eliot’s Middlemarch, and Cather’s Prairie Trilogy (to make another incomplete list) all use weather as theme and accent, and so do a number of more recent novels, some of them examples of “cli-fi” (climate fiction) such as Atwood’s The Year of the Flood, Eggers’ Zeitoun, Galchen’s Atmospheric Disturbances, or McEwan’s Solar. Another obvious gap is film (think of The Wizard of Oz, The Fog, or Groundhog Day). In their research papers, students can certainly take up such texts. Such novels and films join a recent outpouring of exciting writing on the cultural, technical, and scientific history of weather and its varied disciplines. At the end of the class clouds, rain, and sky should never look the same again.

Also FILM 020.

Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.
 
Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online Freshman Seminar preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.
 
Principal Readings
 

Books:

Aristophanes, The Clouds (translation TBA)

Harris, Weatherland: Writers and Artists under English Skies (2015)

Hu, A Prehistory of the Cloud (2015)

Pretor-Pinney, The Cloudspotter’s Guide: The Science, History, and Culture of Clouds (2007)

Shaw, The Drama of Weather (1941)—other editions acceptable (many available online)

Other readings include:

Bible: brief selections from Genesis, Exodus, Deuteronomy, Job, Jonah, Matthew, Acts

Brief selections possible from Aristotle, Homer, Lucretius, Pliny

Shakespeare: selections from Hamlet, King Lear, and The Tempest (at least).

Several short poems such as:

Baudelaire, “The Stranger”

French original: “L’étranger” http://bacdefrancais.net/etranger-baudelaire.php

Bierce, “Weather” (1906)

Dickinson, “A Cloud withdrew from the Sky” (895), “The Sky is low” (1075)

Emerson, “The Snowstorm” (compare McClatchy “A Winter Without Snow”)

Goethe, “In Honor of Howard,” “Atmosphere,” related poems

German originals: http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/gedichte-ausgabe-letzter-hand-7129/285

Richardson, “Essay on Clouds” (2015)

Shelley, “The Cloud” (1820)

Wordsworth, “I Wandered as Lonely as a Cloud”

Short works of prose such as:

Benjamin, selections from the Arcades Project, Folder D

Howard, Essay on the Modification of Clouds (1803)

Ruskin, “Present State of Meteorological Science” (1839), Works of John Ruskin (London: G. Allen, 1903), vol. 1, 206-210, available online as ebook.

Ruskin, “Storm Cloud of the Nineteenth Century” (1884)

Scholarly articles such as:

Katherine Anderson, “Looking at the Sky: The Visual Context of Victorian Meteorology,” British Journal for the History of Science 36 (2003): 301-332

Connor, “Obnubilation” (2009)

Connor, “An Air that Kills: A Familiar History of Poison Gas” (2003)

Daston, “Cloud Physiognomy” (2016) http://rep.ucpress.edu/content/135/1/45

Edwards, “Meteorology as Infrastructural Globalism”

Jacobus, “Cloud Studies: The Visible Invisible,” Journal of the Imaginary and the Fantastic 1:3 (2009)

Kelsey, “Reverse Shot: Blue Marble and Earthrise in the American Imagination”

Krauss, “Stieglitz/Equivalents” (1979)

Russill, “Forecast Earth: Hole, Index, Alert,” Canadian J of Communication 38 (2013): 421–42.

Serres, “The Case of Turner” (1997)

Sturken, “Desiring the Weather: El Niño, the Media, and California Identity,” Public Culture 13, no. 2 (2001)

Works of Art:

Paintings by Constable and Turner, including visit to Yale Center for British Art

Stieglitz, “Equivalents” (sky photographs from the 1920s)

Possible discussion of recent artists such as Baldessari, Chivers, Nakaya, Pétillon, Saraceno, Smilde

Freshman Seminars
Hu, WR, pending approval
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Heather Klemann
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What is childhood for so-called born digital generations? This course explores how developments in technology and communication from toddlers with touchscreens to Pokémon Go! reconfigure cultural constructions of and dearly held beliefs about youth.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Jordan Brower
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

How do movies relate to the world from which they emanate? We will grapple with this question as we study the art and industry of Hollywood, ranging from its Classical period to the present day.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Karin Gosselink
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

This course puts critical reading and academic writing in a global context through an exploration of global citizenship, foreign aid and development, human rights, and the political, economic, and cultural future of globalization.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Margaret Homans
WF 1:00pm-2:15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Does identity come from deep inside you, or does it depend on your being part of a social group external to you? This course explores the paradoxes of different kinds of identity: racial, gendered, sexual, class, national, ethnic, and so on.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Rosemary Jones
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Beauty captivates and attracts, and sometimes repels, and for centuries the idea of beauty has challenged thinkers to describe and account for its place in our lives. We will look at objects that are beautiful and writings about beauty as we explore what is beautiful and what is not.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

The ideal of equality haunts debates concerning the political organization of social life. This writing course examines key texts that shaped this ideal in order to pose the question of how – or whether – equality opposes inequality today.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Katja Lindskog
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What is beauty? How do we define it? The course will approach beauty with a specific inquiry in mind: what can we learn by looking at what is considered beautiful in a particular time and place?

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Pamela Newton
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Travel shapes the way we see the world and understand our place within it. This course explores what we gain and what we lose by becoming travelers and/or tourists.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Bofang Li
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Do you covet a spot on Taylor’s #Squad? Are you a card-carrying member of the Beyhive? Did you scream for a glimpse of Lin at #Ham4Ham? This course looks at the formation, expression, and practices of fan culture in a variety of modern fandoms.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Andrew Willson
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

An investigation into the influence of consumerism and economics on American culture and society. Topics include advertising, technology, art, and societal change. Readings range from academic theory to cultural criticism to The Great Gatsby.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
TTh 4:00pm-5:15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What counts as real science? On whose authority? How can non-scientists evaluate political claims expressed in scientific rhetoric? Examining topics like objectivity, culture and ethics, this seminar investigates the role of science in democratic societies.

SYLLABUS

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Jill Campbell
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

What distinguishes the period we call childhood from other stages of life?  How have works of literature shaped our understanding of what children are like?  What does the experience of reading books offer to children themselves?  Might books offer children windows into a wider world, reveal that there are other people like themselves, introduce them to lives different from their own, and/or inculcate ideas that restrict or close down their views?
 

This seminar will explore these questions by considering select works of literature both for children and about them.  We will read several classic works of children’s literature, including J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan and E. B. White’s Charlotte’s Web, as well as more recent favorites such as J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.  We will investigate the intertwined histories of modern conceptions of childhood and of the children’s book trade, reading poems about childhood by Wordsworth and Blake and visiting the Beinecke to view early works of children’s literature.  We will also sample memoirs of childhood, such as Richard Wright’s Black Boy and Pauli Murray’s Proud Shoes.  Throughout, we will attend to how the meaning of childhood is shaped by categories of race, gender, and socioeconomic class.  We will meet on one or more occasions with children from New Haven Public Schools to learn more about their creative responses to what they read.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Margaret Deli

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

This course will challenge us to consider why “bad bitches” and “nasty women” have moved to the center of our cultural imaginary.  We are entranced by Lisbeth Salander (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) and fascinated by Amy Dunne (Gone Girl).  We cheer when Arya Stark gets her man and watch, captivated, as Daenerys Targaryen burns cities to the ground (Game of Thrones).  Popular opinion might call some or all of these women mad, bad, and dangerous to know—but are they also victims of the power structures they undermine?  And how do they fit into a broader tradition of western storytelling? Beginning in ancient Greece and ending in the present day, we will follow the paths of vengeful mothers and crazy spinsters, husband-hunters, femme fatales and corporate harpies to ask: What is the relationship between femininity and physical or mental deviance? Do stories about powerful women uphold the status quo? And what exactly is a female sociopath—if she exists at all? Texts and screenings will include Euripides’ Medea, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Edith Wharton’s The Custom of the Country, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, the short stories of Patricia Highsmith, Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, and the recent HBO series Game of Thrones.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Rebecca Rush
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

From Cupid’s arrows to mighty Aphrodite, the language of love is filled with images that underscore love’s irresistible power over human hearts. Beginning with Shakespeare’s account of the tragic love between two potent rulers in Antony and Cleopatra, this course grapples with questions about the ways in which love and power are entangled with one another: Why do literary lovers so often emphasize their own powerlessness? Are the pursuit of love and the pursuit of power mutually exclusive? How do rulers and authority figures attempt to regulate desire? As we analyze works like John Donne’s “To His Mistress Going to Bed,” Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, and Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, we will not only explore the power dynamics involved in erotic relationships, but attend to the ways in which these dynamics are bound up with the legacy of colonialism and slavery and inflected by race, class, gender, and sexuality.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Elizabeth Wiet
MW 2:30pm -3:45pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

What would compel a vice president to throw a young journalist in front of a moving train? Why would a housewife leave her husband to trace the origins of a mysterious anti-governmental postal system she believes dates back to the early seventeenth century? Why would an avant-garde performance artist go to extraordinary ends to ensure that his early experimental films never end up in the Anthology Film Archives? Who are these people? And why are they so paranoid?

In this seminar, we will attempt to answer all of these questions by exploring the meaning of paranoia across cultures and time periods. We will examine novels, plays, and films which present characters who are variously bent on revenge, wracked by feelings of persecution, policed for unorthodox sexual preferences, obsessed by conspiracy, and driven by a desire to know everything. Texts and screenings include Thomas Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy, William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, William Godwin’s Caleb Williams, Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, Thomas Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49, the performance art of Jack Smith, Ishmael Reed’s Mumbo Jumbo, David Lynch’s film Mulholland Drive, and the recent Netflix series House of Cards.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Sunny Xiang
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

English 115 explores a theme in the social and historical life of literature through. Our section will focus on Oceanic Politics. For our purposes, the “politics” of oceans are threefold: oceans are the source of aesthetic inspiration; the routes of trade and conquest; and the interface between human and nature. We will explore oceanic politics across different genres and media, including poetry, narrative, drama, film, and digital media. This range of genres and texts will anchor our encounters with regionally-specific historical flashpoints: for example, the Atlantic slave trade, the Indian Ocean opium wars, settler colonialism in the Pacific Islands. We will also wrestle with the myriad contradictions that oceanic politics make available. How ought we understand the romance of exploration in conjunction with the brutalities of conquest? How do oceans function as both sites removed from the territorial centers of power and the very premise of imperial violence? Writers on the will include William Shakespeare, Jack London, Toni Morrison, Jean Rhys, Safiya Sinclair, Ruth Ozeki, and Amitav Ghosh.  

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 12, 2016 and January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Robert Holden
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Briallen Hopper
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Shifra Sharlin
MW 11:35pm-12:50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Emily Ulrich
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Andrew Ehrgood
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

Law has an intellectual structure of its own, and the lawyers and judges who make law and interpret it have peculiar ways of imagining and talking about the world, habits of thought and expression that can mystify the nonlawyer.  In this course, you will begin to learn to read and speak and write the lawyer’s language: you will learn to reason and argue in distinctively lawyerly ways about the sorts of problems that lawyers are paid to attend to.  And as you acquire and become adept at this odd language, you will also evaluate it, assessing its appeal and usefulness to you as a thinker, writer, and citizen.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Randi Epstein
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

SYLLABUS (DRAFT)

Medical and public health stories shape the way individuals view health and disease, and coverage sometime influences scientific research or health policy. This course will give students the chance to join this conversation by writing about medicine and public health for general audiences. To do this well, students must develop a keen sense of audience as they translate complicated science, explain its ramifications, and provide historical context.

Students will write breaking news stories, blog posts, a researched feature article, and a personal essay. They may also have the chance to interview a patient from Yale-New Haven Hospital.

In class, we will analyze essays, book chapters, and news stories for craft. Students will also explore visual media to hone observational skills, and we’ll visit the Center for British Art for a workshop on observation developed for Yale medical students.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Briallen Hopper
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

Religion touches everything—politics, history, literature, art; friendship, family, food, pop culture; ritual, belief, belonging, community; race, gender, sexuality, and souls. It makes sense that writing about religion is incredibly capacious, creative, and diverse.

In this class we will read and write about religion in a variety of genres, including personal and academic essays; journalistic genres, including reported and opinion pieces; and literary and devotional work, such as poems, short stories, and prayers. We will spend time with religious art and artifacts in the archive and at the museum, and explore a variety of sacred spaces on and off campus. In the process, students will strengthen their research and writing skills, and use these skills to pursue their own religious interests and questions.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? If history happens and no one writes about it, what have we missed? If a historian writes about history and no one wants to read it, how could that historian have done a better job?

In writing about history, you place yourself between the history and your audience. Without you, the connection is not made. But history, historian, and audience are always changing: we uncover new sources and ask new questions of old sources; the grand old men of historical scholarship are now history themselves; diverse readerships look to history for information, for inspiration, for entertainment, for identity.

In this class we will talk, read, and write about who we are when we write history and about how we can write a history – from biography to obituary, from museum guide to encyclopedia entry – that is both engaging and honest.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Adam Reid Sexton
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

It has been said that writing about music is like dancing about architecture – and indeed, evoking melody, harmony, and rhythm with words can challenge even the most observant and eloquent among us.  In this section of English 121, students will read and discuss writing on music by not only scholars and critics (e.g. Margo Jefferson and Kalefa Sanneh) but also journalists (Joan Didion and Susan Orlean), a poet (LeRoi Jones), a  novelist (Jonathan Lethem), and many others.  The focus will be on popular music, very broadly defined, and among the concepts to be investigated are taste and “cool.” Written assignments will include a critical review of a performance or recording, a literary essay on a musical topic, a profile of a musician, and an academic paper.  The goal of the course is for students to improve their skills at observation, description, and analysis of culture.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Kim Shirkhani
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

An examination of how exemplary critics, such as David Foster Wallace, Joan Didion, Eula Biss, Kelefa Sanneh, Ariel Levy, Ian Frazer, Kyoko Mori, Adam Gopnik, Henry Louis Gates, Louis Menand, Ted Conover, Amitava Kumar, Wesley Yang, Malcolm Gladwell, Roxane Gay, Eric Schlosser, and Elizabeth Kolbert, and others, use elements of style—diction, tone, narrative structure—as both a mode of investigation and a means of persuasion. Our close attention to how these writers use style as argument will help students develop crucial rhetorical skills especially in light of recent social scientific studies that have affirmed that when it comes to persuading readers on cultural issues, the emotional and experiential are at least as important as the rational or factual.

Units will be organized around readings that highlight a particular stylistic approach—critique via personal narrative, artful analyses of cultural framing (society’s narrative instinct), and more in-depth critiques that interweave personal narrative or perspective with research and analysis. Students will close read model essays for craft, research cultural objects that interest them, and craft their own cultural critiques designed to question and persuade not merely with style but by way of style.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: John Rogers
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm
An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.
 

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Ben Glaser
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Joseph North
MW 11.35pm-12.50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Joseph North
TTh 11.35pm-12.50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: David Quint
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Anthony Reed
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Michael Warner
TTh 11.35pm-12.50pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Jason Bell

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Jason Bell
MW 4.00pm-5.15pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

In this introductory course, we explore how literature has challenged, constrained, and expanded what counts as American. Although we read poetry, novels, essays, film, and music from a range of time periods, geographies, and traditions, this course is not a survey.  We focus on fundamental techniques of analyzing literature in order to examine the narratives of belonging central to our concept of citizenship. Careful, creative reading will be our means of participating in debates that animate both literary studies and popular media. While this course will teach you to be a thoughtful and precise writer, it will also prepare you to treat literature as a resource for everyday living in America today. Authors studied include Claudia Rankine, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Edith Wharton, James Baldwin, Emily Dickinson, John Williams, Louise Erdrich, Joy Harjo, nila northSun, Paula Gunn Allen, and Agnes Martin.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Palmer Rampell

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Palmer Rampell
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Craig Eklund
TTh 9.00am-10.15am

The epic tradition traced from its foundations in ancient Greece and Rome to the modern novel. The creation of cultural values and identities; exile and homecoming; the heroic in times of war and of peace; the role of the individual within society; memory and history; politics of gender, race, and religion. Works include Homer’s Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and Joyce’s Ulysses. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 169.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

The epic tradition traced from its foundations in ancient Greece and Rome to the modern novel. The creation of cultural values and identities; exile and homecoming; the heroic in times of war and of peace; the role of the individual within society; memory and history; politics of gender, race, and religion. Works include Homer’s Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and Joyce’s Ulysses. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 169.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Karin Roffman
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

The epic tradition traced from its foundations in ancient Greece and Rome to the modern novel. The creation of cultural values and identities; exile and homecoming; the heroic in times of war and of peace; the role of the individual within society; memory and history; politics of gender, race, and religion. Works include Homer’s Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and Joyce’s Ulysses. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 169.

Students who wish to enroll in a section of this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 12, 2016 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
W 1.30pm-3.20pm

Fundamentals of the craft of fiction writing explored through readings from classic and contemporary short stories and novels. Focus on how each author has used the fundamentals of craft. Writing exercises emphasize elements such as voice, structure, point of view, character, and tone.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome.

No advance application is required for this course.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Adam Reid Sexton
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Fundamentals of the craft of fiction writing explored through readings from classic and contemporary short stories and novels. Focus on how each author has used the fundamentals of craft. Writing exercises emphasize elements such as voice, structure, point of view, character, and tone.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome.

No advance application is required for this course.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Danielle Chapman
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to reading and writing poetry. Classic examples from Shakespeare and Milton, the modernist poetics of Stein, Pound, Moore, and Stevens, and recent work in a variety of forms and traditions. Students develop a portfolio of poems and write an essay on the poetic craft of poets who have influenced their work.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome.

No advance application is required for this course.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Heather Klemann
MW 10.30am-11.20am +HTBA

Study of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century gothic fiction and the persistence, resurgence, and adaptation of gothic tropes in twentieth and twenty-first century film, television, and prose. Readings include Frankenstein, Northanger Abbey, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula. Films and TV include Inception, Black Swan, Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca, and episodes from Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Prerequisite: Open to Freshmen who took a WR seminar course in the fall term.

Lectures
Pre-1900 Lit w/ permission
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Roberta Frank
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

An introduction to the language and literature of earliest Norway and Iceland. Texts (to be read in the original) include runic inscriptions left behind by the Vikings, verse of their official skalds, the sometimes irreverent mythological poetry of the Edda, and the sagas telling of the Norse discovery of America.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Shawkat Toorawa
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Exploration of Arabian Nights, a classic of world literature. Topics include antecedents, themes and later prose, and graphic and film adaptations.

Also NELC 201, LITR 318, NELC  601.

The medieval Arabic cycle of stories known as The Arabian Nights or The Thousand and One Nights is a classic of world literature. The course is divided into two components: in one, we read the Nights and discuss both its dominant themes—inter alia deceit, love, sex, revenge, violence, and justice—and its storytelling contexts and antecedents (e.g. the the Middle Persian Tales of Bidpai); and in the other, we explore the ways in which its themes and tales have been adapted and appropriated by later authors (e.g. Barth, Gaiman, and Poe in English, Borges in Spanish, Potocki in French and Polish, and Naguib Mahfouz in Arabic); and by filmmakers such as Korda, Pasolini and Barron.

Requirements

* Liking to read (admittedly fun material)
* 12 (twelve) informal weekly reaction essays (3 pages each), due Tuesdays
* Final project (comparative 10-15-page paper)
* Attending three outside talks

Required texts

The Arabian Nights, trans. Husain Haddawy
Sindbad and other stories from the Arabian Nights, tr. Haddawy
Daniel Heller-Roazen, The Arabian Nights (Norton Critical)
Naguib Mahfouz, Arabian Nights and Days
Salman Rushdie, Haroun and the Sea of Stories
Shusha Guppy, The Secret of Laughter
Robert Louis Stevenson, New Arabian Nights [online]
Mary Zimmerman, The Arabian Nights: A Play
Jin-seok Jeon, SeungHee Han, One Thousand and One Nights (v. 1)
Neil Gaiman, Sandman: Fables & Reflections (v. 6)
G. Willow Wilson, Alif The Unseen

Films

‘Croire, imaginer, penser,’ ‘Public and Private Life: The Muslim Town,’ (2001), dir. Philippe Calderon
‘Thief of Baghdad’ (1940), dir. Alexander Korda et al
[Disney’s] ‘Aladdin’ (1992) (dir. Ron Clements)
‘Arabian Nights’ (2000), dir. Steven Barron
‘Arabian Nights’ (1970), dir. Pier Paolo Pasolini [Note: contains nudity and is therefore entirely optional]

Optional

The Arabian Nights, vols 1–3, trans. Malcolm Lyons
John Barth, Chimera
Robert Louis Stevenson, New Arabian Nights
Amina Shah, Tales from the Bazaars of Arabia
Jan Potocki, The Manuscript Found in Saragossa
Marina Warner, Strange Magic
 

Lectures
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Dudley Andrew, Professor: Marta Figlerowicz
MW 11:35am-12.25pm +HTBA

Development of ways to engage films from around the globe productively. Close analysis of a dozen complex films, with historical contextualization of their production and cultural functions. Attention to the development of critical skills. Includes weekly screenings, each followed immediately by discussion.

Optional WR

Also FILM 240/LITR 143

Lectures
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: R. John Williams
TTh 1.30pm-2.20pm +HTBA

Introduction to the long history of media as understood in classical and foundational (and even more recent experimental) theories. Topics involve the technologies of modernity, reproduction, and commodity, as well as questions regarding knowledge, representation, public spheres, and spectatorship. Special attention given to philosophies of language, visuality, and the environment, including how digital culture continues to shape these realms.

Also FILM 160

Lectures
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
TTh 10.30am-11.20am +HTBA

Love, sex, gender, society, and theater practice in Shakespeare’s comic genres, from the early farces and romantic comedies to the problem plays and late romances.

Lectures
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Jessica Brantley, Professor: Ann Killian
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

This course explores writings by women in medieval Britain, with attention to questions of authorship, authority, and audience. Readings include the Lais of Marie de France, Ancrene Wisse, Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, the Showings of Julian of Norwich, The Book of Margery Kempe, the Digby Mary Magdalene play, and the Paston letters.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
TTh 9.00am-10.15am

Study of the medieval verse tales that are at the root core of humorous, realistic, and idealist literature in English, French, Italian, and Spanish. Readings include a wide range of short works such as French fabliaux, fables and lais, novella from Boccaccio’s Decameron, English short tales and lyrics. English translations will be available for all texts, which will also be studied alongside their original languages.

Also FREN 300/HUMS 161

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: David Quint
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

Examination of Shakespeare’s depiction of tragic experience, the alienation of the tragic protagonist both from nature and from the normative ties of culture. Consideration of five major tragedies (Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra), one history (1 Henry IV, Part One), and three major romances (Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest). Readings also include theories of tragedy and tragic thought.

Prerequisite: for English majors, ENGL 125 or 126. For Literature majors, LITR 120. The course is open to non-majors, but they will not have first priority.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Lawrence Manley
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

A study of London in poetry from the Middle Ages to the present, with attention to the interplay of form, genre, and tradition with the changing life of the metropolis.

Prerequisite: ENGL 125-126 or equivalent.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit w/ permission
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Poets who fall outside the mainstream of major English poetry, either by circumstance or by choice, and their role in the evolution of the English poetic tradition. Focus on poetry written between 1500 and 1800, when the idea and contours of a vernacular canon first took shape. The historically contingent character of qualities such as genius, beauty, and good taste.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: John Rogers
MW 10.30am-11.20am +HTBA

A study of John Milton’s poetry, his engagement with the cultural, social, and political struggles of the English Revolution, and his surprising influence on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American letters and religion.  The focus of the course will be on Milton’s major poems, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes, as well as some of the earlier works, such as Comus and Lycidas. The semester will conclude with a consideration of Milton’s American legacy. We will examine, first, Thomas Jefferson and his contemporary, the freed slave Olaudah Equiano, as avid eighteenth-century readers of Milton.  We turn next to the nineteenth century, with an examination of the religions of Mormonism and Seventh-Day Adventism, both of which were shaped at their founding by Paradise Lost.

Lectures
Pre-1900 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Jan Hagens
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Close reading of dramas of reconciliation from the Western canon that have traditionally been categorized as tragedies. Ways in which the recategorization of such plays lends additional complexity and meaning to their endings and allows for new interpretations of the texts, their authors, and the history of drama.

Also LITR 349/THST 317

Seminars
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Margaret Homans
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

Construction of race and gender in literatures of Great Britain, North America, and the Caribbean from the early nineteenth century to the present. Focus on the role of literature in advancing and contesting concepts of race and gender as features of identity and systems of power, with particular attention to the circulation of goods, people, ideas, and literary works among regions. Some authors include Charlotte Bronte, Sojourner Truth, Zora Neale Hurston, Virginia Woolf, Audre Lorde, Chimimanda Adichie, and Kabe Wilson. Second of a two-term sequence; each term may be taken independently.

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Sunny Xiang
MW 11.35pm-12.50pm

Examination of “postcolonial” in relation to Asian Anglophone literature from 1948 to 2008. Concepts include independence and partition, Third Worldism, globalization, and financialization.

Also ER&M 305

Seminars
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Ayesha Ramachandran, Professor: Marta Figlerowicz
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

The fundamental notion of “the self” interrogates categories of race, class, and gender as dimensions of understanding personhood. Introduction to major philosophical frameworks for thinking about “the self” from antiquity to the present; students examine case studies from across the world, aiming to put contemporary debates about these issues in historical perspective.

Also HUMS 402/LITR 319

Seminars
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Marc Caplan
Th 1.30pm-3.20

Comparative study of representative writings by African, Caribbean, and African American authors of the past one hundred years, together with European, American, and South African Jewish authors writing in Yiddish, Hebrew, French, and English. Examination of the paradoxically central role played by minority, or marginal groups, in the creation of modern literature and the articulation of the modern experience.

Also AFAM 343/AFST 326/JDST 325/LITR 343

Seminars
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

This course is designed for students who have strong opinions about one or more of the performing arts and who would like to learn how to launch those opinions into print—in newspapers, magazines and the blogosphere. This class will require participants to write like journalists—vividly, provocatively and on deadline.  Students will run a class blog on the performing arts, and will attend screenings and live professional performances of plays, music concerts and dance events.

No advance application required.

Also FILM 397/THST 228.

Creative Writing
HU
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Susan Choi
F 1.30pm-3.20pm

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Because this semester’s shopping period will only accommodate one meeting each of Professor Choi’s sections of ENGL 245 and ENGL 465 before schedules are due, Professor Choi will hold an Informational Session for students interested in either of the classes on Friday, January 20, 2017, from 1:00-3:00pm in LC 319. Professor Choi will distribute syllabi for the classes and answer any questions. Students already admitted or wait-listed are strongly encouraged to attend. All interested students are welcome.

Welcome to English 245! In this class you will write fiction; receive and give out constructive criticism; and read and analyze outstanding published works of fiction. Below are the requirements for this course, as well as general guidelines to assure a productive workshop for us all.

ATTENDANCE

Your regular attendance is crucial for the success of the workshop as a whole. In this course you’re equally an author and a critic, and fulfilling your critical responsibilities to your fellow writers is as important here as producing your own work. If you have more than one unexcused absence, each additional unexcused absence will lower your grade 1/3 of a letter.

WORKSHOP

You’ll sign up to submit work to our workshop twice this semester. Choose for your submissions the work on which you most want feedback.

Submission length:  There is no set length for workshop submissions, but consider the ballpark as between 5 and 15 pages.

Format:  Double-space, number your pages, and include your name. If you can, please print double-sided as well, to avoid waste.

Distribution:  Writers must bring to class hard copies of their submissions one week in advance of their workshop, to be distributed to classmates and to me.

FEEDBACK

As a member of the workshop, I’ll expect your regular participation in classroom discussions of the writing ‘up’ for workshop any given week.  In addition, I expect you to treat each workshop submission in the following way:

1)   read each submission first for pleasure; put your feet up, and don’t hold a pen.

2)   a bit later, read the submission again, as a critic. This time, hold a pen, and make what marginal comments occur to you on the page.

3)   last, summarize your critical response to the submission in a typed paragraph. When doing this, think of the sort of feedback you, as a writer, would appreciate. Be specific, yet constructive. Print and bring to workshop two copies of your critical response, one for the author of the piece, and one for me.

READING, AND WRITING EXERCISES

Every week for the first 6 weeks of class there will be assigned reading of published works, and assigned writing exercises, which I’ll announce and explain during class. Assigned readings may include works by such writers as Julia Alvarez, Jennifer Egan, Vladimir Nabokov, and Michael Cunningham. Exercises will focus on specific aspects of craft such as point of view, characterization, dialogue, setting, and plot. You will be responsible for these assignments regardless of whether you might also be ‘up’ for workshop on the due date of a given assignment. You are welcome to submit a writing assignment piece as your workshop piece. If you miss class, it is your responsibility to contact either me or a classmate to find out the assignment.

PUBLIC READINGS
Every year, the Yale Creative Writing Program brings outstanding writers to campus. You are not required, but you are strongly encouraged to take advantage of this resource.

FINAL REVISION
A substantial revision of one of your two workshop pieces will be due to my box in the English Department on a date to be announced during Reading Period.  

GRADING
Your final grade will be based upon your attendance, participation in discussions, critical responses to your peers, and timely completion of all reading and writing assignments.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Cynthia Zarin
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar workshop for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Yale.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: Please also submit your application form, Writing Sample, and Statement of Purpose in hard copy to the English Department office, LC 107.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Paul Fry
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

The rise of landscape in the works of Wordsworth, Constable, Byron, and Turner, with emphasis on the nonhuman in relation to consciousness and history. Some attention to the influence of earlier poetry and visual art and to effects on later painters.

Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Peter Cole
W 1.30pm-3.20pm

Consideration of American poetry written by Jews and Jewish poetry written by Americans and the relation these poems bear to other American poetry and to the poetry written by Jews elsewhere in the world. Key figures include Emma Lazarus, Gertrude Stein, Moshe Leyb-Halpern, Charles Reznikoff, Louis Zukofsky, Allen Ginsberg, Anthony Hecht, Adrienne Rich, and Harold Bloom. All readings in English.

Also LITR 322/JDST 341

Seminars
American Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Ryan Wepler
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

To present a piece of writing for the express purpose of making your audience laugh takes a peculiar combination of courage and confidence. After all, you aren’t simply seeking to avoid the audience’s displeasure; a humorous work must create pleasure, or else it has failed. The notion that you can give a large number of people the pleasure of laughter when most others cannot takes an abnormally high level of confidence in your ability to perceive, create, and express (or an extreme lack of self-awareness). This class is for students who have the guts and conviction that they can make others laugh, or for those seeking to acquire such confidence by discovering and understanding the comic techniques employed by great humorists.

This course will emphasize four broad elements of humorous writing: texture, tone, character, and narrative. We will focus less formally on the various genres of humor writing (parody, satire, farce, &c.).  Above all, this is a writing course. Humor writing demands an exceptionally high level of linguistic grace and precision, as a slight difference in expression can mean the difference between a laugh and a groan. A strong emphasis will be placed on crafting sentences elegantly and expressing meanings with exactitude, skills essential not just to writing humorously, but to all genres of writing.

Prerequisites: ENGL 120 recommended, but not required.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

In this course students will read essays by the luminaries of the food world exploring food narratives from many angles: family meals, recipes, cookbooks, restaurant reviews, memoir, and film. The units in this course will explore food within its cultural contexts.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing
WR (pending)
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Stephen Longmire
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Sometimes words aren’t enough. This is a course for writers who turn to images for inspiration and want to incorporate them into their work. At once a seminar and a workshop, it offers students a series of models, past and present, to focus assignments that invite them to pair visual and verbal expression in various ways, believing the two are complementary, perhaps inseparable.

The course takes its lead, and part of its title, from a term the novelist and photographer Wright Morris coined to describe the experimental books he began making in the 1940s, pairing his fiction and photography on equal terms. In his photo-texts, the words are not captions and the images are not illustrations. Photo-text has been called silent film in book form. William Blake’s illuminated books, poems he wrote, illustrated and printed himself, and today’s artists’ books and graphic novels, are related forms, image-texts where two media join hands to form another. Words and images also go hand in hand in children’s literature, collage, graffiti, language poetry, screenplays, and a host of other hybrid forms. Such hybrids often follow moments of technological innovation, and we are living through one of the greatest since Gutenberg, in the way text and images are disseminated. What are the image-texts of the digital era?

The physical aspects of image-texts, from letterpress to digital printing and basic bookbinding, will be emphasized as creative opportunities, remembering that writing and imagery are material, as well as virtual, realities. Writers of fiction and non-fiction, playwrights and poets are all welcome. No experience making images is required.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Ruth Yeazell
MW 11.35pm-12.50pm +HTBA

A selection of nineteenth-century novels, with attention to cultural contexts. Authors chosen from the Brontës, Gaskell, Dickens, Collins, Eliot, Trollope, and Hardy.

Lectures
Pre-1900 Lit
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: David Bromwich
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

Major shorter poems in English from the second generation of Romantics to the first generation of moderns. Among the poets likely to receive most attention are Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Emily Bronte, Christina Rossetti, Whitman, Dickinson, Hardy, Hopkins, Yeats, Robinson, Frost, and Eliot.

Recommended though not required: ENGL 126 or a course on pre-20th-century poetry.

Seminars
Pre-1900 w/ permission
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Richard Deming
TTh 11.35pm-12.50pm

Study of central works by three foundational writers of the nineteenth century. Cultural and historical context; questions concerning American identity, ethics, and culture, as well as the function of literature; the authors’ views on the intersections of philosophy and religious belief, culture, race, gender, and aesthetics. Readings include novels, short fiction, and essays.

Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit, American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: R. John Williams
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

A survey of literature’s role in anticipating and constructing potential futures since 1887. Early Anglo-American and European futurism during the years leading up to World War I; futures of speculative fiction during the Cold War; futuristic dreams of contemporary cyberpunk. What literature can reveal about the human need to understand both what is coming and how to respond to it.

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Martin Haggland
MW 3.30pm-4.20pm +HTBA

An examination of concepts and assumptions in contemporary views of literature. Theories of meaning, interpretation, and representation. Critical analysis of formalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, poststructuralist, Marxist, and feminist approaches to theory and to literature.

Lectures
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Joseph Cleary
MW 11.35pm-12.50pm

A broad overview of Irish culture and literature between roughly 1890 and the end of World War II. The efforts of Irish writers to end Ireland’s long-standing cultural subordination to England and to create a distinctive and distinguished Irish national literature. Discussion of recent postcolonial, Marxist, and world literature critical approaches to the period. Authors include Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats, James Joyce, Elizabeth Bowen, and Samuel Beckett.

Seminars
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: James Berger
W 1.30pm-3.20pm

The persistent impulse in Western culture to imagine the end of the world and what might follow. Social and psychological factors that motivate apocalyptic representations. Differences and constant features in apocalyptic representations from the Hebrew Bible to contemporary science fiction. Attitudes toward history, politics, sexuality, social class, and the process of representation in apocalyptic texts.

Also AMST 257

Seminars
American Lit
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: James Berger
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

Portrayals of cognitive and linguistic impairment in modern fiction. Characters with limited capacities for language as figures of “otherness.” Contemporaneous discourses of science, sociology, ethics, politics, and aesthetics. The ethics of speaking about or for subjects at the margins of discourse.

Also AMST 235

Seminars
American Lit
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Michele Stepto
M 1.30pm-3.20pm

An eclectic approach to stories and storytelling for and by children. Authors include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, Carlo Collodi, Jean de Brunhoff, Ursula LeGuin, J. K. Rowling, Dr. Seuss, Maurice Sendak, Philip Pullman, and Neil Gaiman.

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Marc Robinson
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

Study of the drama, performance, and dance theater created in the last ten years, with special attention to work produced in 2016-2017. Readings from both published and unpublished American and British plays, contemporary criticism and theory, interviews, and essays by the artists themselves. Video of works created by companies such as Elevator Repair Service and the Nature Theater of Oklahoma. May include attendance of productions at performance spaces in and around New York City.

Also THST 329.

Seminars
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Study of the Bible as a literature—a collection of works exhibiting a variety of attitudes toward the conflicting claims of tradition and originality, historicity and literariness. Pre-1800 with completion of supplementary assignments in the language of the King James Bible. If there is sufficient interest, a second section will be offered.

English: Pre-1800 with instructor’s permission and completion of supplementary assignments in the language of the King James Bible.

Also LITR 154

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit w/ permission
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Robert Stepto
M 1.30pm-3.20pm

A study of autobiographical writings from Mary Rowlandson’s Indian captivity narrative (1682) to the present. Classic forms such as immigrant, education, and cause narratives; prevailing autobiographical strategies involving place, work, and photographs. Authors include Franklin, Douglass, Jacobs, Antin, Kingston, Uchida, Balakian, Rodriguez, and Bechdel.

Also AFAM 406/AMST 405

Senior Seminars
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 11.35pm-12.50pm

The major Victorian poets, Tennyson and Browning, in the context of the romanticism they inherited and transformed. A selection of other Victorians whose genius or popularity warrants attention, including Morris, the Rossettis, Hardy, Swinburne, Hopkins, and Barrett Browning.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: David Kastan
W 1.30pm-3.20pm

An early 18th-century critic wrote: “A reader of Milton must be always on duty; he is surrounded by sense; it rises in every line.” This course is designed to respond to that recognition. It will be an intensive reading of Milton’s Paradise Lost, along with some of the relevant prose, focusing on the ways in which the poem responds at the level of form to the various literary, political, and theological pressures that bear upon it. We will meet several times in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, looking at early editions of relevant texts, including early copies of Paradise Lost, to see what they may tell us about what the poem might have meant to its early readers as a way of mediating our experience of the poem today. The courses requires weekly responses to readings plus three more sustained writing assignments.

Prerequisite: ENGL 220.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Katie Trumpener
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

Examination of ways that twentieth-century British, American, and anglophone writers rewrite, revise, and reconcile key novels by Jane Austen and Charlotte Brontë as prototypes of a women’s novel tradition. Particular attention to narrative voice, reader identification, and the novel’s function as a record of social norms and as an agent of historical change.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1900 w/ permission
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Joseph Cleary
W 2.30pm-4.20pm

Drawing on recent scholarship on modernist studies, postcolonial studies, and literary world-systems, this seminar explores how some leading Anglophone writers produced bold new works that engaged with conceptions of European civilizational crisis, the transfer of political power and cultural capital from Europe to the United States, and a rapidly-changing world order. Readings include Pascale Casanova, Alexis de Tocqueville, Henry James, Ford Maddox Ford, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, T. S. Eliot, W. B. Yeats, Gertrude Stein, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Also LITR 412.

Senior Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Wai Chee Dimock
W 1.30pm-3.20pm

A broad selection of short stories, poems, and novels, accompanied by class performances, culminating in a term project with a significant writing component. “Performance” includes a wide range of activities including: staging; making digital films and videos; building websites; game design; and creative use of social media. Readings include poetry by Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Claudia Rankine; fiction by Herman Melville, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Junot Diaz.

Also AMST 475

Senior Seminars
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Robert Stepto
W 1.30pm-3.20pm

The African American practice of poetry between 1900 and 1960, especially of sonnets, ballads, sermonic, and blues poems. Poets include Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Sterling Brown, Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, and Robert Hayden. Class sessions at the Beinecke Library for inspection and discussion of original editions, manuscripts, letters, and other archival material.

Also AFAM 408/AMST 460

Senior Seminars
American Lit
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: James Berger
M 1.30pm-3.20pm

Attempts of contemporary American authors to put the complexities of history into written form. Narrative as the privileged mode of historical representation; differences between what is regarded as academic history, popular history, and historical fiction; the influence of power and of the writer’s own historical position on historical narrative; effects of ethnicity, gender, and race on the creation and reception of history; writers’ use of historical fiction to change the ways readers think about the present and the future.

Also AMST 466

Senior Seminars
American Lit
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Stephanie Newell
T 9.25am-11.15am

Introduction to experimental African novels that challenge realist and documentary modes of representation. Topics include mythology, gender subversion, politics, the city, migration, and the self. Ways of reading African and postcolonial literature through the lenses of identity, history, and nation.

Also AFST 449

Senior Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Cynthia Zarin
T 2.30pm-3.45pm

Writing of prose at the intermediate level. Daily assignments of c. 300 words, a weekly lecture, and a weekly tutorial. Application forms available on the Web by mid-November. Counts as a nonfiction course in the writing concentration. All undergraduate students are welcome to apply.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The special application form for ENGL 450 Daily Themes can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Lectures, Creative Writing
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Cynthia Zarin
T 2.30pm-3.45pm

Writing of prose at the intermediate level. Daily assignments of c. 300 words, a weekly lecture, and a weekly tutorial. Application forms available on the Web by mid-November. Counts as a nonfiction course in the writing concentration. All undergraduate students are welcome to apply.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The special application form for ENGL 450 Daily Themes can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Lectures, Creative Writing
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Anne Fadiman
Th 2:30-5:20

A seminar and workshop in first-person writing. Students explore a series of themes (including food, family, love, and identity) both by writing about their own lives and by reading British and American memoirs, autobiographies, personal essays, and letters. An older work, usually from the nineteenth or early twentieth century, is paired each week with a more recent one on the same theme.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: Please also submit your application form, Writing Sample, and Statement of Purpose in hard copy to the English Department office, LC 107.

Please read the course description below, paying special attention to sections highlighted in bold, some of which describe exceptions to the standard application procedure.
 
This is a reading and writing class—part lecture, part seminar, part workshop—in which students explore a series of themes (including love, loss, family, and identity) both by writing about their own lives and by reading British and American memoirs, autobiographies, letters, and personal essays.
 
First-person writing is a peculiar blend of candor, catharsis, narcissism, and indiscretion. The purpose of this class is to harness these elements with sufficient rigor and imagination that self-portraiture becomes interesting to others as well as to oneself. An older work, written between the late eighteenth and the mid-twentieth century, will be paired each week with a more recent one on the same theme—a coupling designed to erode the traditional academic boundaries between eras and between “ought” and “want” reading. (For instance, when we consider the theme of love, we will read excerpts from H. G. Wells’s On Loves and the Lover-Shadow and Joyce Maynard’s At Home in the World, and write personal essays on an aspect of love, not necessarily romantic.) Readings will include works by James Baldwin, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Joan Didion, Lucy Grealy, Maxine Hong Kingston, Mary McCarthy, James Thurber, and Virginia Woolf, among others. Our connections to the readings will be reinforced by several author visits. By writing a thousand-word first-person essay every other week, students will face the same problems the authors in our syllabus have faced, though they may come up with very different solutions. Students will critique each other’s work in class and by e-mail. Each student will have at least five individual conferences with me, most of them an hour long, in which we’ll edit your work together.
 
Students who wish to apply to “Writing about Oneself” should submit the standard Application for Creative Writing and Journalism Courses to the “English Student Resources” Drop Box on Classesv2 by noon on Wednesday, December 7. Please note the following special instructions for English 455 applications:
 
                1. The standard application specifies “a” writing sample. Ignore that! I can assess your work better if you submit two samples, totaling 5-15 pages if double-spaced work or around half that if single-spaced. (If the total length exceeds that, please mark the sections to which I should pay particular attention.) You may even submit three samples if one is very short (for instance, a Daily Themes one-pager).
 
           2. If possible, your samples should belong to the same genre we’ll be reading and writing (“non-non”–nonacademic nonfiction). Personal essays, other nonacademic essays, and literary journalism would all be appropriate. In other words, writing about yourself would be welcome but not required. (If fiction is your strength, one but not both of your samples may be a short story. Similarly, if you’re a playwright, one sample may be a scene from a play. The other sample should be non-non.) Choose pieces that give your literary style a thorough airing. Cogency will be valued; interminable tomes will cause me to droop.
 
           3. Your “statement of purpose”—essentially, a letter to me—should explain some things your samples won’t tell me. The application suggests “a paragraph,” but you are welcome to write as long a letter as you wish. For instance: Why do you want to take the class? What would you contribute to it? What writing experience and honors have you accumulated? (I’ll still consider you if the answer is None and None.) What are you majoring in? (English majors receive no special preference.) Is there anything else that might help me understand you as a writer or a person?
 
           4. When you list the writing classes you’ve taken, please include the name of the class and the instructor, not just the number.
 
I am not looking for a particular kind of writer. My ideal class is a mix of experienced journalists and creative writers (usually fiction writers or playwrights), with a couple of students who fit no category but just happen to write beautifully. Although most of its members will likely be juniors and seniors, anyone may apply. There are no prerequisites.
 
Once English 455 is up on Classesv2, the site may have a bit more information at the bottom of the course description, including the names of a couple of former students who have offered to answer questions about the class.
 
Creative Writing
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Peter Cole
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Intensive readings in the history and theory of translation paired with practice in translating. Case studies from ancient languages (the Bible, Greek and Latin classics), medieval languages (classical Arabic literature), and modern languages (poetic texts).

Also HUMS 427/JDST 316/LITR 348.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Claudia Rankine
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar and workshop in the writing of verse.

May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.
 

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

 
Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: John Crowley
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

Practice in all aspects of writing a screenplay. Focus is on elements shared with other forms of fiction, including story, character, dialogue, and audience expectations. Students plan, pitch, outline, and write a large part of a single original screenplay through the semester, while studying screenplays and films selected to illustrate narrative modes and styles, as well as briefer examples of scene construction and dialogue.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: Screenplay excerpts are welcomed but not required as application writing samples for this course.

Also FILM 396.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Susan Choi
F 3.30-5.20

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: In your Statement of Purpose, please describe your interest in fiction-writing and in this course in particular.

Because this semester’s shopping period will only accommodate one meeting each of Professor Choi’s sections of ENGL 245 and ENGL 465 before schedules are due, Professor Choi will hold an Informational Session for students interested in either of the classes on Friday, January 20, 2017, from 1:00-3:00pm in LC 319. Professor Choi will distribute syllabi for the classes and answer any questions. Students already admitted or wait-listed are strongly encouraged to attend. All interested students are welcome.

Welcome to English 465! This class is an intensive fiction workshop. While there are no official prerequisites for this class, participants are expected to be avid readers of fiction with prior experience in the writing of fiction and basic familiarity with the workshop format. Each student will submit three pieces for workshop, the third being a revision of one of the first two. Students will also provide each other with written editorial feedback, and will maintain a daily ‘notebook.’ Below are these requirements and general guidelines in greater detail.

ATTENDANCE

Your regular attendance is crucial for the success of the workshop as a whole. In this course you’re equally an author and a critic, and fulfilling your critical responsibilities to your fellow writers is as important here as producing your own work. If you have more than one unexcused absence, each additional unexcused absence will lower your grade 1/3 of a letter.

WORKSHOP

You’ll sign up to submit work to our workshop three times this semester. Your third submission must be a revision of either of the first two submissions.

We’ll divide the semester into three ‘cycles’ (Round One, Round Two, Revision) and I’ll ask you to sign up for a workshop date within each of the three cycles.  Once you commit to your workshop dates, you will be expected to stick with them if at all possible. If it is absolutely necessary for you to reschedule, please discuss with me first.

Submission length:  There is no set length for workshop submissions, but consider the ballpark as between 5 and 15 pages.

Format:  Double-space, number your pages, and include your name. If you can, please print double-sided as well, to avoid waste.

Distribution:  Writers must bring to class hard copies of their submissions one week in advance of their workshop, to be distributed to classmates and to me. *Exceptions will be made for our first workshop and our post-recess workshop. In those cases, writers will distribute their work to the class via email on a date to be determined and readers are responsible for printing out the stories under discussion.  All discussion of work in class will be from hard copies.

FEEDBACK

As a member of the workshop, I’ll expect your regular participation in classroom discussions of the writing ‘up’ for workshop any given week. In addition, I expect you to treat each workshop submission in the following way:

1)   read each submission first for pleasure; put your feet up, and don’t hold a pen.

2)   a bit later, read the submission again, as a critic. This time, hold a pen, and make what marginal comments occur to you on the page.

3)   last, summarize your critical response to the submission in a typed paragraph. When doing this, think of the sort of feedback you, as a writer, would appreciate. Be specific, yet constructive. Also, be concise. Print and bring to workshop two copies of your critical response, one for the author of the piece, and one for me.

DAILY ‘NOTEBOOK’

Given the volume of reading and writing the workshop alone will require, I will not assign additional reading, or specific exercises. I will, however, ask you to make a commitment to that part of your attention dedicated to fiction-writing by keeping a ‘notebook’ in which you make a daily ‘entry’ of about 100 words. 100 words happens to be the exact length of the three numbered instructions, taken together, which appear immediately above this paragraph. As you can see, it’s not a lot of words. This entry can be anything at all: an idea for a story;  a quick sketch of a character or a setting; a few lines of overheard diagloue; a rumination; an account of a dream; a memory. The object here is to keep in touch with the fiction-writing impulse, and to ‘bank’ ideas and sentences, throughout a busy semester. To help you maintain this habit, your notebook entries will take the form of daily emails to meI will not read your entries but I’ll make sure you’re making them, and prod you if you aren’t. To help me organize my inbox, please use the same subject heading for all entries:  465 daily notebook. If you are emailing me for another reason, please be sure to change the subject heading.

PUBLIC READINGS
Every year, the Yale Creative Writing Program brings outstanding writers to campus. You are not required, but you are strongly encouraged to take advantage of this resource.

GRADING
Your final grade will be based upon your attendance, participation in discussions, critical responses to your peers, and timely completion of all reading and writing assignments, including the daily ‘notebook.’

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2017
W 3.30pm-5.20pm

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Bob Woodward
T 2.30-4.20

English 467b is a seminar that examines the practices, methods, ethical dilemmas, and impact of journalism. The main attention will be on investigative political reporting and writing: How others have done it, what works, and what doesn’t. Students will be exposed to best practices in journalism as revealed in newspaper and magazine articles and books.

The course is designed not just for those considering journalism or writing as a career but for anyone hoping to enter a profession in which conveying information is central to success. That may be almost everyone. Think of the seminar as a class to improve your methods for obtaining, skeptically evaluating and assessing information, and then writing it up for others to read.

Students will read specific articles and books that will be discussed in class and analyzed in occasional short papers.

I will meet or speak by phone with students individually during the term in order to provide evaluations, assistance on reporting, writing or the final project, and, if sought, career guidance. Since this is only my fourth year teaching a formal course, it will continue to be a learning experience for me and I hope to get strong feedback from the students as the course proceeds on what is valuable to them — the readings, writing assignments, and class discussion. Some assignments may change based on student reactions and feedback.

Evelyn Duffy, my full-time assistant who has worked on my last four books, will help me with the class. Chris Haugh, a second-year Yale Law student and alumni of this course, is my teaching fellow this year. They are both available – Chris in New Haven, Evelyn by email or phone – to help with assignments or logistical issues. Don’t hesitate to contact Evelyn (EvelynMDuffy@gmail.com) or Chris (christopher.haugh@yale.edu) with any questions or ideas for improvement you may have.

SYLLABUS

Fulfills the core seminar requirement for Yale Journalism Scholars. No prerequisites.

Also PLSC 253.

This course requires an application, which is due by Saturday, December 10, at noon (extended deadline). The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors and seniors, and graduate students (with department approval). The application will consist of two parts. The first should be a personal statement explaining your interest in the course, your Yale class year, any previous writing courses, your main extra-curricular activities, and any journalism or work experience. The second part should be a writing sample–an article that has been published anywhere or a paper you have submitted for a class. The application form, which is available on the English department website, should be submitted by noon on December 10 by uploading it to my course site (or to the “English Student Resources” site) on Classes*v2. I encourage people who are writers or editors of campus publications to apply, but I also want students who have little or no experience with campus publications to apply as well.

Instructor’s Biography

Woodward graduated from Yale in 1965 and is currently an associate editor of The Washington Post where he has worked since 1971. He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes, first for the Post’s coverage of the Watergate scandal with Carl Bernstein and second as the lead reporter for the Post’s coverage of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. He has authored or coauthored 18 books, all of which have been national non-fiction bestsellers. Twelve of those have been #1 national bestsellers, ranging from All the President’s Men (1974) to Obama’s Wars (2010).

In 2014, Robert Gates, former director of the CIA and Secretary of Defense, said that he wished he’d recruited Woodward into the CIA, saying of Woodward, “He has an extraordinary ability to get otherwise responsible adults to spill [their] guts to him…his ability to get people to talk about stuff they shouldn’t be talking about is just extraordinary and may be unique.” Gates is, of course, representing the government’s position about people telling the truth and talking about what he thinks they shouldn’t address. The class is going to be very much directed at this idea of finding out what the government and others don’t want reporters or the public to know.

(See www.bobwoodward.com under “Full Biography” for more details and background.)

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Bob Woodward
T 2.30-4.20

English 467b is a seminar that examines the practices, methods, ethical dilemmas, and impact of journalism. The main attention will be on investigative political reporting and writing: How others have done it, what works, and what doesn’t. Students will be exposed to best practices in journalism as revealed in newspaper and magazine articles and books.

The course is designed not just for those considering journalism or writing as a career but for anyone hoping to enter a profession in which conveying information is central to success. That may be almost everyone. Think of the seminar as a class to improve your methods for obtaining, skeptically evaluating and assessing information, and then writing it up for others to read.

Students will read specific articles and books that will be discussed in class and analyzed in occasional short papers.

I will meet or speak by phone with students individually during the term in order to provide evaluations, assistance on reporting, writing or the final project, and, if sought, career guidance. Since this is only my fourth year teaching a formal course, it will continue to be a learning experience for me and I hope to get strong feedback from the students as the course proceeds on what is valuable to them — the readings, writing assignments, and class discussion. Some assignments may change based on student reactions and feedback.

Evelyn Duffy, my full-time assistant who has worked on my last four books, will help me with the class. Chris Haugh, a second-year Yale Law student and alumni of this course, is my teaching fellow this year. They are both available – Chris in New Haven, Evelyn by email or phone – to help with assignments or logistical issues. Don’t hesitate to contact Evelyn (EvelynMDuffy@gmail.com) or Chris (christopher.haugh@yale.edu) with any questions or ideas for improvement you may have.

SYLLABUS

Fulfills the core seminar requirement for Yale Journalism Scholars. No prerequisites.

Also PLSC 253.

This course requires an application, which is due by Saturday, December 10, at noon (extended deadline). The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors and seniors, and graduate students (with department approval). The application will consist of two parts. The first should be a personal statement explaining your interest in the course, your Yale class year, any previous writing courses, your main extra-curricular activities, and any journalism or work experience. The second part should be a writing sample–an article that has been published anywhere or a paper you have submitted for a class. The application form, which is available on the English department website, should be submitted by noon on December 10 by uploading it to my course site (or to the “English Student Resources” site) on Classes*v2. I encourage people who are writers or editors of campus publications to apply, but I also want students who have little or no experience with campus publications to apply as well.

Instructor’s Biography

Woodward graduated from Yale in 1965 and is currently an associate editor of The Washington Post where he has worked since 1971. He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes, first for the Post’s coverage of the Watergate scandal with Carl Bernstein and second as the lead reporter for the Post’s coverage of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. He has authored or coauthored 18 books, all of which have been national non-fiction bestsellers. Twelve of those have been #1 national bestsellers, ranging from All the President’s Men (1974) to Obama’s Wars (2010).

In 2014, Robert Gates, former director of the CIA and Secretary of Defense, said that he wished he’d recruited Woodward into the CIA, saying of Woodward, “He has an extraordinary ability to get otherwise responsible adults to spill [their] guts to him…his ability to get people to talk about stuff they shouldn’t be talking about is just extraordinary and may be unique.” Gates is, of course, representing the government’s position about people telling the truth and talking about what he thinks they shouldn’t address. The class is going to be very much directed at this idea of finding out what the government and others don’t want reporters or the public to know.

(See www.bobwoodward.com under “Full Biography” for more details and background.)

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Donald Margulies
T 2:30-5:00

An intensive workshop in advanced playwriting techniques. Discussion of works by contemporary playwrights. In addition to weekly exercises, students write a full-length play. Prerequisite: an intermediate course in playwriting or screenwriting, or with permission of the instructor.

Also THST 327b.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 7, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: Playwriting applicants should submit five pages of creative writing in any genre and a letter of intent (no maximum length).

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2017

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Professor: Mark Oppenheimer
TBA

We are clearly in a golden age of podcasting. Many of the shows that we associate with the medium have first lives as radio shows: This American Life, Radiolab, Snap Judgment, etc. But they all now have more listeners, by orders of magnitude, in their downloadable podcast form; what’s more, many of them do extended, more ambitious versions, or versions that keep all the original (read: obscene) dialogue, for their podcast audiences. Then, of course, there are the audio shows that have no existence on terrestrial radio: Serial, 99% Invisible, WTF with Marc Maron, and others. The podcast has become the medium for the most innovative radio nonfiction—indeed, for the best creative nonfiction today, radio or otherwise. In this course, we will study the medium, including its deep history and origins, and collaboratively produce a series of podcasts on undergraduate life at Yale, for (we hope) a wide national, even international audience.

Every week, we will have reading or listening, or both, in the history of nonfiction (and occasionally fiction) audio. We will journey from the early, transglobal, empire-sustaining innovations of the BBC to the legendary radio work of Orson Welles; pick up with the beginnings of underground and community radio in the United States; and read and listen widely in the work of the great legends of what might be called the public-radio era, from the mid-1970s on, including Joe Frank and the Kitchen Sisters. Special attention will be paid to contemporary radio documentarians and storytellers like Jay Allison, Glynn Washington, Ira Glass, Scott Carrier, and The Moth under artistic director Catherine Burns.

Simultaneously, drawing on that history, we will dive right in and produce our own podcasts. Using audio resources available at Yale, as well as those that we will purchase, we will learn basic techniques for audio production: recording, cutting audio, sound design. Students will be expected to select a topic for the final project by the second week and begin reporting and collecting “tape” (not tape, but the term lives on) by the third week. Students will have to choose topics that a) focus on Yale undergraduate life, and b) do not conflict with one another. That way, we will finish with a 12-part series of podcasts that together can make a season of a show about undergraduate life at Yale (I’m tentatively calling it Undergrad!, but I hope we can do better). We’ll post them on our own website, but we’ll also get big distribution, I am sure … but more on that later.

In-class workshops, in which we listen to each other’s tape and critique it, will be the center of this course. The other center will be the considerable time spent reporting and editing, on software that you may just be learning. The other center will be writing the script that will hold your podcast together, the connective tissue. Many centers, it seems.

Radio editing is very time-intensive, as is radio-listening (there is no way to “skim” two hours of listening). You can spend three hours just trying to get one second of tape to sound just right. So this course will require a lot of hours. While it should be the most fun course you ever take, it is not a good idea to treat it as a gut or a breezy fifth class. If you work hard, you’ll probably get a good grade; if you don’t work hard enough, it may be difficult to pass.

Prerequisite: Strong comfort in learning new software, or at least eagerness to try.

Students are encouraged to apply by Wednesday, December 7, at noon, but interested students are also welcome to attend the first class meeting.

The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions:

1. Although you won’t be held to this, if you had to decide right now, what topic would you choose for a short podcast episode about undergraduate life?

2. In lieu of a writing sample, you may email an audio production to the professor at mark.oppenheimer@yale.edu.

Creative Writing
Hu, pending approval
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Mark Oppenheimer
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm

The history and practice of writing journalistic essays or articles in which the principal actor is not a person but a notion or idea. Conventions, tropes, and authorial strategies that give rise to the best works work in the genre, focusing on examples from the 20th century, including George Orwell, Hannah Arendt, Tom Wolfe, Renata Adler, and Janet Malcolm. Students write their own example of the journalism of ideas.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Mark Oppenheimer
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm

The history and practice of writing journalistic essays or articles in which the principal actor is not a person but a notion or idea. Conventions, tropes, and authorial strategies that give rise to the best works work in the genre, focusing on examples from the 20th century, including George Orwell, Hannah Arendt, Tom Wolfe, Renata Adler, and Janet Malcolm. Students write their own example of the journalism of ideas.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Richard Deming
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

A study of contemporary poetry and poetics that explores both literary criticism and creative writing. Ways to assess prevailing poetic values and articulate one’s own. Attention to critical skills for engaging recent developments in the field; development of a sense of the current aesthetic landscape. Includes four additional class meetings with influential contemporary poets who represent a variety of styles and modes.

Senior Seminar or Creative Writing. No advance application required.

Senior Seminars, Creative Writing
American Lit with permission of instructor (Senior Seminar only)
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Richard Deming
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

A study of contemporary poetry and poetics that explores both literary criticism and creative writing. Ways to assess prevailing poetic values and articulate one’s own. Attention to critical skills for engaging recent developments in the field; development of a sense of the current aesthetic landscape. Includes four additional class meetings with influential contemporary poets who represent a variety of styles and modes.

Senior Seminar or Creative Writing. No advance application required.

Senior Seminars, Creative Writing
American Lit with permission of instructor (Senior Seminar only)
WR
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Deborah Margolin

A seminar and workshop in advanced playwriting that furthers the development of an individual voice. Study of contemporary and classical plays to understand new and traditional forms. Students write two drafts of an original one-act play or adaptation for critique in workshop sessions. Familiarity with basic playwriting tools is assumed.

Prerequisite: THST 320 or 321, or a college seminar in playwriting, or equivalent experience.

Also THST 322.

Special application instructions: Open to juniors and seniors, nonmajors as well as majors, on the basis of their work; priority to Theater Studies majors. Writing samples should be submitted to the instructor before the first class meeting.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2017

Special projects set up by the student in an area of particular interest with the help of a faculty adviser and the director of undergraduate studies, intended to enable the student to cover material not otherwise offered by the department. The course may be used for research or for directed reading, but in either case a term paper or its equivalent is normally required. The student meets regularly with the faculty adviser. To apply for admission, a student must submit an application and prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the office of the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Second term of the optional yearlong senior essay. Students may begin the yearlong essay in the spring term of the junior year, allowing for significant summer research, with permission of the instructor. After ENGL 490.

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Professor: Roberta Frank
W 9.25am-11.15am

A close reading of Beowulf, with some attention to shorter heroic poems.

Also LING 501.

Graduate Seminars
Medieval Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Lawrence Manley
M 3.30pm-5.20pm

A study of Shakespeare’s later plays, emphasizing form and dramaturgy, in relation to works by his contemporaries and to the institutions of the Jacobean theater. Nine plays by Shakespeare and masques and plays by Marston, Middleton, Chapman, Tourner, Webster, and Beaumont and Fletcher.

Graduate Seminars
Early Modern
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Greta LaFleur
W 1.30pm-3.20pm

This course offers a broad survey of the history of racial science and racialist thinking in the Atlantic world from the early modern period through the late nineteenth century. Rather than attempting to detail the histories of specific racial formations (such as blackness or whiteness), the course tracks the intellectual history of the emergence of “race” as a specific category of human differentiation and traces a swath of its most muscular—and pernicious—permutations through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 

Also AFAM 705/AMST 708/HIST 708/HSHM 729.

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Jill Campbell
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

A study of writings that seek a specific effect in their reader—whether didactic instruction and moral formation, or an instigation to take action towards political change–and their uneasy alliance in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries with the literary genre of prose fiction.  How do writings that seek to inform or reform the real person or the real world put fictional narratives to use?  How is the genre of the novel shaped, explicitly or implicitly, by writing to a specific “end”?  Texts will include novels, tales for children, life-writing, poetry with a “cause,” polemical essays; possible authors include Olaudah Equiano, Edmund Burke, William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, Hannah More, Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, Anna Barbauld, and Mary Shelley. 

Also WGSS 769.

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

The major Victorian poets, Tennyson and Browning, in the context of the romanticism they inherited and transformed. A selection of other Victorians whose genius or popularity warrants attention, including Morris, the Rossettis, Hardy, Swinburne, Hopkins, and Barrett Browning. 

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Wai Chee Dimock
W 1.30pm-3.20pm

A broad selection of short stories, poems, and novels, accompanied by class performances, culminating in a term project with a significant writing component. “Performance” includes a wide range of activities including: staging; making digital films and videos; building websites; game design; and creative use of social media. Readings include poetry by Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Claudia Rankine; fiction by Herman Melville, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Junot Diaz.

Also AMST 775.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Michael Warner
Th 1.30pm-3.20pm

Although the concept of the Anthropocene can be dated in various ways, two of the most important benchmarks seem to be the beginning of industrial production in the late 18C and the uptick in CO2 emissions from the mid 19C (petroleum came into use during the Civil War).  As it happens, the period between these two moments is also that in which the modern language of the environment took shape, from Cuvier’s discovery of extinction and Humboldt’s holistic earth science to the transformative work of Thoreau and George P. Marsh.  This course will shuttle between the contemporary debate about the significance and consequences of the Anthropocene and a reexamination of that environmental legacy.  We will look at the complexity of “nature,” beginning with the Bartrams, Jefferson, Cuvier, and the transatlantic literatures of natural history; georgics and other genres of nature writing; natural theology; ambiguities of pastoral in American romantic writing (Bryant, mainly), the impact of Humboldt (Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman); westward expansion and Native American writing about land; Hudson School painting and landscape architecture; etc.  We will also think about the country/city polarity and the development of “grid” consciousness in places like New York City (not just the famous grid plan of 1811 but, more tellingly, the new relation to resources that followed the Croton aqueduct and gaslight).  One aim will be to assess the formation and legacy of key ideas in environmentalism, some of which may now be a hindrance as much as a foundation–for example, the idea of nature as a primordial equilibrium from which the human is estranged.  Secondary readings will include classic readings from Leo Marx, Henry Nash Smith, and William Cronon, as well as more recent attempts to reconceive environmental history (Joachim Radkau), ecocriticism (Lawrence Buell), and related fields, as well as science journalism (Elizabeth Kolbert).   We will attend and discuss Dipesh Chakrabarty’s Tanner lectures in February.  Students will be invited to explore a wide range of research projects; and one assignment will be to devise a teaching unit for an undergraduate class on the same topic, since one aim of this course is to generate further teaching in environmental humanities. 

Also AMST 848.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

The postwar period is of great interest for recent media theorists and historians. Both our moment and the immediate postwar era faced the threat of species extinction, new leaps in computing power, the invention of institutions for monitoring and managing the environment, an ontological flattening between humans, machines, animals, and objects, and ongoing unsettlements in gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity. This course examines the postwar moment of cybernetic excitement and strain, including such media as bombs, bugging devices, computers, film, hi-fi, hydrophones, radio, tape, and TV, such themes as archival abundance, decryption, inter-species communication, mind control, planet management, and such writers as Arendt, Heidegger, McLuhan, Nabokov, Wiener, in addition to more recent scholars working on the postwar period. Each student will write a substantial original research paper on a relevant topic.

Also FILM 652.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Stephanie Newell
Th 9.25am-11.15am

Introduction to key debates about post-1945 world literature in English, the politics of English as a language of world literature, and theories of globalization and postcolonial culture. Course themes include: colonial history, postcolonial migration, translation, national identity, cosmopolitanism, writing the self, global literary prizes.

Also AFST 746.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Marc Caplan
Th 1.30pm-3.20pm

This seminar compares representative writings by African, Caribbean, and African American authors of the past one hundred years, together with European, American, and South African Jewish authors writing in Yiddish, Hebrew, French, and English. This comparison examines the paradoxically central role played by minority, “marginal” groups in the creation of modern literature and the articulation of the modern experience.

Also AFAM 660, AFST 678, CPLT 678, JDST 678.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Robert Stepto
M 1.30pm-3.20pm

At least a dozen North American autobiographies are studied, mostly from the “American Renaissance” to the present. Discussion of various autobiographical forms and strategies as well as of various experiences of American selfhood and citizenship. Slave narratives, spiritual autobiographies, immigrant narratives, autobiographies of childhood or adolescence, relations between autobiography and class, region, or occupation. 

Also AFAM 588/AMST 710.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Marc Robinson
Th 10.00am-11.50am

Topics include the Living Theater, Happenings, Cunningham/Cage, Open Theater, Judson Dance Theater, Grand Union, Bread and Puppet Theater, Ontological-Hysteric Theater, Theater of the Ridiculous, Meredith Monk, Robert Wilson, and the Wooster Group. 

Also AMST 681/DRAM 496.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Joseph Roach
W 3.30pm-5.20pm

Uniting the approaches of theater history, dramaturgy, and performance studies, this seminar will begin with the case study of Lolita Chakrabarti’s Red Velvet (2012, revived 2016), a play about the life of Ira Aldridge (1807-1867), the African-American actor who is said to be the first black man to play Othello.  Readings will include plays, critical theories, and historical documents from the eighteenth century to the twenty-first. The seminar will be organized around selected genealogies of performance as represented by adaptations, revivals, and critical re-writings:  Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko by Thomas Southerne and Biyi Bandele-Thomas; John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera by Bertolt Brecht, Wole Soyinka, and P. L. Deshpande; Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe by Richard Brinsley Sheridan and Derek Walcott; and Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot by Femi Osofisan and Suzan-Lori Parks. 

Also AFAM 793/AMST 694.

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017
Professor: Ben Glaser
T 10.30am-12.20pm

Poetry and related writings from the first half of the twentieth century, with emphasis on expanding notions of modernism and recent critical reevaluations of poetic genres and forms. What, for instance, is the relation between new formalism and modernism’s “formal” poets (Yeats, Hart Crane, Stevens, Louise Bogan)? How do women poets (Bogan, Loy, Millay, Georgia Douglas Johnson) concerned with sentimentality and the figure of the poetess illuminate the role of gender in lyric theory? We will look at Robert Frost and Sterling Brown to explore theories of voice and vernacular sound; read Eliot and Pound to rethink periodization and the emergence of literary criticism as an institution; and pursue the legacy of Stein, Williams, and others in debated canons of lyric, language, and conceptual poetry. The Beinecke’s Pound, H.D., Loy, and James Weldon Johnson collections will be a starting point for exploring new work in modernism’s print and digital archives.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2017

Designed to help fill gaps in students programs when there are corresponding gaps in the department’s offerings. By arrangement with faculty and with the approval of the DGS.

Open to current students in the English graduate programs. Submit a completed Directed Reading Proposal Form to the department registrar by the end of the first week of classes.

Graduate Seminars
Term: Spring
2017