Courses

Professor: Deborah Margolin
MW 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar and workshop in advanced playwriting that furthers the development of an individual voice. Study of contemporary and classical plays to understand new and traditional forms. Students write two drafts of an original one-act play or adaptation for critique in workshop sessions. Familiarity with basic playwriting tools is assumed.

Open to juniors and seniors, non-majors as well as majors, on the basis of their work; priority to Theater Studies majors.

Writing samples and statement of purpose should be submitted to the instructor before the first class meeting.

Prerequisite: THST 320 or 321, or a college seminar in playwriting, or equivalent experience.

May count toward the English major course requirement.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2016

An examination of major literary works with an aim of understanding how a tradition develops. In the fall term, works and authors include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Virgil, the Bible, and Dante. In the spring term, authors vary somewhat from year to year and include Petrarch, Cervantes, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Goethe, Tolstoy, Proust, and Eliot.

See Online Course Information for section information.

May count toward the English major course requirement.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Joseph Roach
TTh 10:30am-12:20pm

Ensemble studio explorations of classic scenes from the repertoire of modern and contemporary drama.

Admission by audition only. Preference to Theater Studies majors.

May count toward the English major course requirement.

HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Harold Bloom
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

A reading of Shakespeare’s tragedies and romances, with an emphasis on their originality in regard to tradition and their influence on Western representation since the seventeenth century. Secondary readings included.

May count toward the English major course requirement.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Harold Bloom
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

The complexities of poetic influence in the tradition of the English language, from Tennyson and Whitman to the present.

May count toward the English major course requirement.

Seminars
HU
Term: Spring
2016
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Close study of Austen’s novels, with special attention to the critique of social and literary convention.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Freshman Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: David Bromwich
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

An intensive examination of the career, political thought, and speeches of Abraham Lincoln in their historical context.

Enrollment limited to freshmen.  Preregistration required; see under Freshmen Seminar Program.

Also PLSC 025.

Freshman Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit, American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Wai Chee Dimock
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

An introduction to American literature, told through the vibrant lives, ethnic diversities, and innovative genres revolving around three urban centers.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Also AMST 016.

Freshman Seminars
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: David Kastan
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

It is on the pillars of the four major tragedies that Shakespeare’s reputation most firmly rests. The seminar is designed to explore these four plays in detail, trying to see what makes them great in the way that almost all readers and audiences have recognized. We will think about them as plays to be performed, as drama to be read, and as texts that have been constructed by the activities of various people, Shakespeare of course the first among them. And we will think about them as plays deeply embedded in the history of their own moment, as well as in later histories, which they in some part are responsible for.

Enrollment limited to freshmen.  Preregistration required; see under Freshmen Seminar Program.

Freshman Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Heather Klemann
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What is childhood for so-called born digital generations? This course explores how developments in technology and communication reconfigure cultural constructions of and dearly held beliefs about youth.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Katja Lindskog
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What makes a person beautiful? And why does it matter in our daily lives? This course will approach beauty from a variety of angles, such as its relationship to gender, evolution, economics, and fashion.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Pamela Newton
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Modern cities challenge us to build communities on a large scale. In this seminar we explore what we want from our cities and what they tell us about ourselves.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Rosemary Jones
WF 11:35am-12:50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What shapes our definition of beauty? In this course we will explore whether society’s desire for certain kinds of beauty may obscure or distort the potential of beauty to represent or suggest a conception of truth.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Heather McKendry
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

This course explores how our understanding and experience of death, mourning, and mortality have been reshaped by the introduction of new media technologies, such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Reddit. @Deathin140 #DyingtoTakethisClass

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Grey Anderson
MW 9:00am-10:15am
Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

This course charts developments in twenty-first-century U.S. military power, with attention to new technologies and changing concepts of war, as well as related political, ethical, and strategic dilemmas.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Heather Klemann
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What is childhood for so-called born digital generations? This course explores how developments in technology and communication reconfigure cultural constructions of and dearly held beliefs about youth.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

The ideal of equality haunts debates concerning the political organization of social life.  This writing course examines key texts that shaped this ideal in order to pose the question of how – or whether – equality opposes inequality today.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Matthew Hunter
MW 4:00pm-5:15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

To be real, sincere, authentic—these values are not just exalted by American culture, they are equated with it. This writing seminar takes a hard look at this connection between “realness” and the American imagination.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Elizabeth Gansen
TTh 4:00pm-5:15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Things surround us, functioning as the stuff of our everyday lives. In this course, we examine the nature of this relationship and its implications. To what extent do things define us, and we, them?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What counts as real science? On whose authority?  How can non-scientists evaluate political claims expressed in scientific rhetoric?  Examining topics like objectivity, culture and ethics, this seminar investigates the role of science in democratic societies.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Karin Gosselink
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

What is human identity? Who are we when everything that shapes us—our homes, our families, our friends, our work—has been suddenly stripped away? These are the central questions posed by the literature of exile. We will read a mix of classic and contemporary literature as we explore what we lose and gain in leaving home, becoming strangers, and making our way in new lands. Readings include a Shakespeare play (King Lear); short stories by Anton Chekhov, James Joyce, Edwidge Danticat and Jhumpa Lahiri; essays by Edward Said, Hamid Naficy, and Bharati Mukherjee; poetry by Warsan Shire and Agha Shahid Ali; novels by Vladimir Nabokov and Aleksandar Hemon; a graphic memoir by Marjane Satrapi (Persepolis), and a film (The Grand Budapest Hotel).

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

From William Shakespeare to Toni Morrison, literature and politics have long gone hand-in-hand. How they do so and to what end, however, remain hotly debated questions. Must literature mirror things as they are? Or can literature play an active part in social politics? Does politically engaged literature become propaganda? Or is literature a sphere free from realpolitik? How do class, gender, and race each inflect these questions? Are there other ways to grasp the status of politically engaged literature as a work of art? This class will consider the thorny relationship of literature to wider arenas of social life by closely examining how such questions repeatedly emerge from a range of genres and historical traditions. Taking cues from the global wave of rebellions in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, we will pay particular attention to the return of these questions with a vengeance in post-1945 American literature. Texts include Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1; Larsen’s Passing; Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying; Eliot’s The Wasteland; Ginsberg’s The Fall of America; Baraka’s Black Art; Di Prima’s Revolutionary Letters; Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49; and Morrison’s Beloved.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Jessica Matuozzi
WF 11:35am-12:50pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

Pirates and gangsters and drug lords, oh my! What constitutes outlawry and why do we romanticize outlaws, even as our justice system consigns them to the lowest echelons of society? This course explores literary and filmic portrayals of bandit queens, hackers, and other unregenerate antiheroes in order to trouble the line between the noble and the contemptible. We will consider the ways that rebellion both unsettles and reinforces social hierarchies and normative notions of success. We will refract our scandalous subjects through models of revenge, nostalgia, and futurity. And we will make and break our own rules about how to dissect and discuss great works of fiction.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Ryan Carr
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

Why we are fascinated by things that are abhorrent?  What is the relationship between monstrosity and normality? The course considers these questions through a range of texts: Ovid, Shakespeare’s The TempestFrankenstein, tales by Poe and poetry by Dickinson, The Picture of Dorian Gray, the 1922 film Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens, stories by Flannery O’Connor, Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz, Hannah Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem, and Toni Morrison’s Beloved.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Sunny Xiang
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

What are the politics and aesthetics of speaking from the position of the minor? How does “voice” function as a political metaphor and/or as a narrative device? How do the political imperatives of an individual speaking on the behalf of a marginalized people manifest in the literary domain? This course will explore such questions through a range of Anglophone literary texts, paying particular attention to postcolonial and ethnic American frameworks. Writers on our agenda will include William Shakespeare, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, V.S. Naipaul, Jean Rhys, and Art Spiegelman. In our approach to these authors, we will investigate and complicate the more relationship between art and politics, text and context, and form and content.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Briallen Hopper
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Pamela Newton
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Shifra Sharlin
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Andrew Willson
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Andrew Ehrgood
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

Law has an intellectual structure of its own, and the lawyers and judges who make law and interpret it have peculiar ways of imagining and talking about the world, habits of thought and expression that can mystify the nonlawyer.  In this course, you will begin to learn to read and speak and write the lawyer’s language: you will learn to reason and argue in distinctively lawyerly ways about the sorts of problems that lawyers are paid to attend to.  And as you acquire and become adept at this odd language, you will also evaluate it, assessing its appeal and usefulness to you as a thinker, writer, and citizen.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114 or 120, or permission by the instructor.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Briallen Hopper
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

Religion touches everything—politics, history, literature, art; friendship, family, food, pop culture; ritual, belief, belonging, community; race, gender, sexuality, and souls. It makes sense that writing about religion is incredibly capacious, creative, and diverse.

In this class we will read and write about religion in a variety of genres, including personal and academic essays; journalistic genres, including reported and opinion pieces; and literary and devotional work, such as poems, short stories, and prayers. We will spend time with religious art and artifacts in the archive and at the museum, and explore a variety of sacred spaces on and off campus. In the process, students will strengthen their research and writing skills, and use these skills to pursue their own religious interests and questions.

Everyone is welcome in this class. Interested students should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
MW 9:00am-10:15am

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? If history happens and no one writes about it, what have we missed? If a historian writes about history and no one wants to read it, how could that historian have done a better job?

In writing about history, you place yourself between the history and your audience. Without you, the connection is not made. But history, historian, and audience are always changing: we uncover new sources and ask new questions of old sources; the grand old men of historical scholarship are now history themselves; diverse readerships look to history for information, for inspiration, for entertainment, for identity.

In this class we will talk, read, and write about who we are when we write history and about how we can write a history – from biography to obituary, from museum guide to encyclopedia entry – that is both engaging and honest.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Adam Reid Sexton
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

It has been said that writing about music is like dancing about architecture – and indeed, evoking melody, harmony, and rhythm with words can challenge even the most observant and eloquent among us.  In this section of English 121, students will read and discuss writing on music by not only scholars and critics (e.g. Margo Jefferson and Kalefa Sanneh) but also journalists (Joan Didion and Susan Orlean), a poet (LeRoi Jones), a  novelist (Jonathan Lethem), and many others.  The focus will be on popular music, very broadly defined, and among the concepts to be investigated are taste and “cool.” Written assignments will include a critical review of a performance or recording, a literary essay on a musical topic, a profile of a musician, and an academic paper.  The goal of the course is for students to improve their skills at observation, description, and analysis of culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Kim Shirkhani
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

An examination of how exemplary critics, such as David Foster Wallace, Joan Didion, Eula Biss, Kelefa Sanneh, Ariel Levy, Ian Frazer, Kyoko Mori, Adam Gopnik, Henry Louis Gates, Louis Menand, Ted Conover, Amitava Kumar, Wesley Yang, Malcolm Gladwell, Roxane Gay, Eric Schlosser, and Elizabeth Kolbert, and others, use elements of style—diction, tone, narrative structure—as both a mode of investigation and a means of persuasion. Our close attention to how these writers use style as argument will help students develop crucial rhetorical skills especially in light of recent social scientific studies that have affirmed that when it comes to persuading readers on cultural issues, the emotional and experiential are at least as important as the rational or factual.

Units will be organized around readings that highlight a particular stylistic approach—critique via personal narrative, artful analyses of cultural framing (society’s narrative instinct), and more in-depth critiques that interweave personal narrative or perspective with research and analysis. Students will close read model essays for craft, research cultural objects that interest them, and craft their own cultural critiques designed to question and persuade not merely with style but by way of style.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114 or 120, or permission by the instructor.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

In this course we will read essays by the luminaries of the food world; students will explore food from many angles, writing about the economic, political, cultural, emotional, and nutritional aspects that go into what we eat. The units in this course will explore the tension between the elite and the democratic, the professional and the amateur, the foreign and the homegrown, the expensive and the affordable, tasting good foods all along the way. We will view popular food films and discuss how these films reflect our attitudes toward what we eat. Assignments will focus on what might be called the “sub-genres” of the food essay: the factors that shape family meals, journalistic essays based upon certain recipes for beloved foods, cookbooks, and the food memoir. Integral to the course is our food blog, which serves as a forum for our joint food discoveries.

Prerequisites: ENGL 114 or 120, or permission by the instructor.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Randi Epstein
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

Medical and public health stories shape the way individuals view health and disease, and coverage sometime influences scientific research or health policy. This course will give students the chance to join this conversation by writing about medicine and public health for general audiences. To do this well, students must develop a keen sense of audience as they translate complicated science, explain its ramifications, and provide historical context.

Students will write breaking news stories, blog posts, a researched feature article, and a personal essay. They may also have the chance to interview a patient from Yale-New Haven Hospital.

In class, we will analyze essays, book chapters, and news stories for craft. Students will also explore visual media to hone observational skills, and we’ll visit the Center for British Art for a workshop on observation developed for Yale medical students.

The course is open to science students and non-scientists alike. Prerequisites: ENGL 114 or 120, or permission by the instructor.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Alastair Minnis
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

What is English 125/126?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

What is English 125/126?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Langdon Hammer
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

What is English 125/126?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

What is English 125/126?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Jill Richards
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

What is English 125/126?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Michael Warner
WF 9:00am-10:15am

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Jordan Brower
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Bofang Li
MF 11:35am-12:50pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Karin Roffman
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Brian Walsh
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

The epic tradition traced from its foundations in ancient Greece and Rome to the modern novel. The creation of cultural values and identities; exile and homecoming; the heroic in times of war and of peace; the role of the individual within society; memory and history; politics of gender, race, and religion. Works include Homer’s Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and Joyce’s Ulysses. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Also LITR 169.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Justin Neuman
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

The epic tradition traced from its foundations in ancient Greece and Rome to the modern novel. The creation of cultural values and identities; exile and homecoming; the heroic in times of war and of peace; the role of the individual within society; memory and history; politics of gender, race, and religion. Works include Homer’s Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and Joyce’s Ulysses. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Also LITR 169.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Ian Cornelius
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

The epic tradition traced from its foundations in ancient Greece and Rome to the modern novel. The creation of cultural values and identities; exile and homecoming; the heroic in times of war and of peace; the role of the individual within society; memory and history; politics of gender, race, and religion. Works include Homer’s Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and Joyce’s Ulysses. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, between December 14, 2015 and January 14, 2016.

Also LITR 169.

Introductory Classes
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Alfred Guy
TTh 11:35am-12:25pm, 1 HTBA

A survey of twentieth- and twenty-first-century science fiction, focusing on how changing technologies produce new ideas about human identity. Emphasis on innovations in science and engineering as well as new forms of social, political, and economic life. Works by Octavia Butler, Philip K. Dick, Ursula Le Guin, and William Gibson.

Lectures
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

Fundamentals of the craft of fiction writing explored through readings from classic and contemporary short stories and novels. Focus on how each author has used the fundamentals of craft. Writing exercises emphasize elements such as voice, structure, point of view, character, and tone.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome. The standard creative writing course application is not required for admission to ENGL 134. Interested students should attend the first class for placement information.

Creative Writing
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Adam Reid Sexton
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

Fundamentals of the craft of fiction writing explored through readings from classic and contemporary short stories and novels. Focus on how each author has used the fundamentals of craft. Writing exercises emphasize elements such as voice, structure, point of view, character, and tone.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome. The standard creative writing course application is not required for admission to ENGL 134. Interested students should attend the first class for placement information.

Creative Writing
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Danielle Chapman
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to reading and writing poetry. Classic examples from Shakespeare and Milton, the modernist poetics of Stein, Pound, Moore, and Stevens, and recent work in a variety of forms and traditions. Students develop a portfolio of poems and write an essay on the poetic craft of poets who have influenced their work.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome. The standard creative writing course application is not required for admission to ENGL 135. Interested students should attend the first class for placement information.

Creative Writing
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Roberta Frank, Professor: Anya Adair
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

The evolution of English from its beginnings nearly 1500 years ago to the language of Beowulf, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Jane Austen, Melville, Twain, Langston Hughes, Woody Allen, Maya Angelou, and Kendrick Lamar. An overview of the ‘Englishes’ that populate our globe, including a look at the ways that technology affects language.

Also LING 109.

Lectures
Pre-1900 Lit; Pre-1800 Lit with permission of instructor
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Lawrence Manley
TTh 10:30am-11:20am, 1 HTBA

Love, sex, gender, society, and theater practice in Shakespeare’s comic genres, from the early farces and romantic comedies to the problem plays and late romances.

Lectures
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: David Kastan, Professor: Carla Baricz
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

“Reade him, therefore; and againe, and againe: and if then you doe not like him, surely you are in some manifest danger, not to understand him” wrote John Heminges and Henry Condell, the editors of the 1623 First Folio, in their address to the reader. Generations of readers and theater-goers have taken this advice to heart, so much so, that Shakespeare has become shorthand for the English Renaissance. As Cleopatra says of Antony at the end of Shakespeare’s play, Shakespeare’s “legs bestrid the ocean: his rear’d arm / Crested the world: his voice was propertied /As all the tuned spheres, and that to friends.” This course attempts to create a more balanced view of the playwright and of his works by examining two other figures who, like Shakespeare, were “souls of the[ir] age,” but who have since been overshadowed by their brilliant compatriot. Reading Shakespeare alongside Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson, whose careers bookended Shakespeare’s and who were just as successful in their own lifetimes, if not more so, will allow us to better appreciate the richness of the English early modern dramatic tradition, as well as to more fully understand the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance. By thinking deeply about plays such as Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, Doctor Faustus, and the Jew of Malta, Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, and The Tempest, and Ben Jonson’s Alchemist, Volpone, and Bartholomew Fair, we will attempt to understand the ways in which such works both respond to and challenge key aspects of early modern culture and social life. We will examine the manner in which such texts raise issue about early modern conceptions of gender and sexuality, class, wealth, trade, and colonialism, magic and the occult, the private and public, theatricality and meta-theatricality, and about literature itself.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Lawrence Manley
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

A survey of English lyric poetry from the early sixteenth century through the mid-seventeenth, focusing on poetic forms and traditions and the place of poetry in the social, political, and religious life of the time. Authors include Wyatt, Sidney, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Aemylia Lanyer, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Milton, Lovelace, and Marvell.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Jill Campbell
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Readings of poems, plays, novels, essays, and letters by English women from the late seventeenth century to the early nineteenth, with attention to historical context and change. Writers include Aphra Behn, Mary Astell, Anne Finch, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Sarah Scott, Maria Edgeworth, Phyllis Wheatley, Dorothy Wordsworth, Jane Austen, and Mary Shelley. Topics include the reputation and reception of female authors; women’s appropriation of male literary forms; the implications of generic choice; accounts of female utopian communities; and treatments of love, marriage, female friendship, and homoerotic desire.

Also WGSS 239.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

This course is designed for students who have strong opinions about one or more of the performing arts and who would like to learn how to launch those opinions into print—in newspapers, magazines and the blogosphere. This class will require participants to write like journalists—vividly, provocatively and on deadline.  Students will run a class blog on the performing arts, and will attend screenings and live professional performances of plays, music concerts and dance events.

No advance application required.

Also FILM 397/THST 228.

Creative Writing
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Susan Choi
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review. Prerequisite: a previous course in English or in another literature.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Cynthia Zarin
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar workshop for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Yale.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: Please also submit your application form, Writing Sample, and Statement of Purpose in hard copy to the English Department office, LC 107.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Ryan Wepler
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Teaches skills essential to being funny in print, with an emphasis on texture, tone, character, and narrative. Students will close read the work of their classmates and pieces by professional humor writers with the goal of generating an ever-expanding set of techniques for both reading humor and writing humorously.

Prerequisites: ENGL 120 recommended, but not required.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing
WR
Term: Spring
2016
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

A seminar and workshop in writing about the human body in motion, with a focus on the art of dance. Close reading of exemplary dance writing from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The challenges and possibilities of writing artfully about nonverbal expression. Students use a variety of approaches to write about dance and other performance genres.

Prerequisites: No previous knowledge of dance required.

No advance application required. A brief statement of interest will be requested in the first class.

Also THST 244.

Brian Seibert is a dance critic for the New York Times and just published a book called What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing. The course will not draw exclusively on dance writers, but include poets, novelists, and theorists, as well.

Creative Writing
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Stephen Longmire
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Sometimes words aren’t enough. This is a course for writers who turn to images for inspiration and want to incorporate them into their work. At once a seminar and a workshop, it offers students a series of models, past and present, to focus assignments that invite them to pair visual and verbal expression in various ways, believing the two are complementary, perhaps inseparable.

The course takes its lead, and part of its title, from a term the novelist and photographer Wright Morris coined to describe the experimental books he began making in the 1940s, pairing his fiction and photography on equal terms. In his photo-texts, the words are not captions and the images are not illustrations. Photo-text has been called silent film in book form. William Blake’s illuminated books, poems he wrote, illustrated and printed himself, and today’s artists’ books and graphic novels, are related forms, image-texts where two media join hands to form another. Words and images also go hand in hand in children’s literature, collage, graffiti, language poetry, screenplays, and a host of other hybrid forms. Such hybrids often follow moments of technological innovation, and we are living through one of the greatest since Gutenberg, in the way text and images are disseminated. What are the image-texts of the digital era?

The physical aspects of image-texts, from letterpress to digital printing and basic bookbinding, will be emphasized as creative opportunities, remembering that writing and imagery are material, as well as virtual, realities. Writers of fiction and non-fiction, playwrights and poets are all welcome. No experience making images is required.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Ruth Yeazell
MW 11:35am-12:25pm, HTBA

A selection of nineteenth-century novels, with attention to cultural contexts. Authors chosen from the Brontës, Gaskell, Dickens, Collins, Eliot, Trollope, and Hardy.

Lectures
Pre-1900 Lit
Hu
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Richard Deming
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Study of central works by three foundational writers of the nineteenth century. Cultural and historical context; questions concerning American identity, ethics, and culture, as well as the function of literature; the authors’ views on the intersections of philosophy and religious belief, culture, race, gender, and aesthetics. Readings include novels, short fiction, and essays.

Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit, American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: James Berger
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

Literary portrayals of animals are used to examine the relations between literature, science, and social and political thought since the late nineteenth century. Topics include Darwinist thought, socialism, fascism, gender and race relations, new thinking about ecology, and issues in neuroscience.

Also AMST 358.

Seminars
American Lit
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Amy Hungerford
MW 1:30pm-2:20pm, HTBA

American fiction; works by Richard Wright, Flannery O’Connor, Patricia Highsmith, Vladimir Nabokov, Jack Kerouac, Philip Roth, Marilynne Robinson, Toni Morrison, Cormac McCarthy, Alison Bechdel, and Junot Diaz.

Also AMST 261.

Lectures
American Lit
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Margaret Homans
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Historical survey of works of fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction that have shaped and responded to feminist, queer, and transgender thought since the start of second-wave feminism. Authors include Wittig, Morrison, Walker, Lorde, Piercy, Rich, Russ, Anzaldua, Cisneros, Tan, Kingston, Bechdel, and Rankine.

Also WGSS 297.

Seminars
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
TTh 11:35-12:25, 1 HTBA

The role of literature in constructing representations of America as an idea, a nation, a colonial settlement, and a participant in world affairs. What kind of place America is and who belongs there; the consequences of America’s history for its national literature. Emphasis on the ways texts represent and contest social concepts of race and gender difference.

Also AFAM 140/AMST 211/ER&M 210/WGSS 211.

Lectures
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Martin Hagglund
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm, HTBA

An examination of concepts and assumptions in contemporary views of literature. Theories of meaning, interpretation, and representation. Critical analysis of formalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, poststructuralist, Marxist, and feminist approaches to theory and to literature.

Also LITR 300.

Lectures
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Robert Stepto
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

Visual art in African American books since 1900. Artists include Winold Reiss, Aaron Douglas, E.S. Campbell, Tom Feelings, and the FSA photographers of the 1930s and ’40s. Topics include Harlem Renaissance book art, photography and literature, and children’s books. Research in collections of the Beinecke Library and the Yale Art Gallery is encouraged.

Also AFAM 423, AMST 384.

Seminars
American Lit
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Joseph North
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Intensive close reading of selected 20th- and 21st-century lyric poetry, with the aim of coming to recognize our own political sensibilities, as well as working to expand them into new depths and ranges. Poets include Seamus Heaney, Dylan Thomas, W.B. Yeats, W.H. Auden, Lesbia Harford, Pablo Neruda, Bertolt Brecht, Frank O’Hara, Wislawa Szymborska, Edith Södergran, and Audre Lorde.

Seminars
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: James Berger
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

The persistent impulse in Western culture to imagine the end of the world and what might follow. Social and psychological factors that motivate apocalyptic representations. Differences and constant features in apocalyptic representations from the Hebrew Bible to contemporary science fiction. Attitudes toward history, politics, sexuality, social class, and the process of representation in apocalyptic texts.

Also AMST 257.

Seminars
American Lit
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: James Berger
M 1:30-3:20

Examination of how people with disabilities are represented in U.S. literature and culture. Ways in which these representations, along with the material realities of disabled people, frame society’s understanding of disability; the consequences of such formulations. Various media, including fiction, nonfiction, film, television, and memoirs, viewed through a wide range of analytical lenses.

Also AMST 406.

Seminars
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Stephanie Newell
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Introduction to key debates about post-war world literatures in English, the politics of English as a language of postcolonial literature, and debates about globalization and culture. Course themes include: colonial history, postcolonial migration, translation, national identity, cosmopolitanism, global literary prizes.

Also ER&M 332.

Seminars
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Sunny Xiang
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

A study of how “literature” services, reflects, and contradictions the political formation “Asian America.” Examines the role of literature in 1960s-1970s Asian American Movement and representations of literariness in contemporary Asian American novels, poems, plays.

Also ER&M 354.

Seminars
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Michele Stepto
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

An eclectic approach to stories and storytelling for and by children. Authors include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, Carlo Collodi, Jean de Brunhoff, Ursula LeGuin, J. K. Rowling, Dr. Seuss, Maurice Sendak, Philip Pullman and Neil Gaiman. Critical materials include essays by I.B. Singer, Roald Dahl, and Walter Benjamin, among others, as well as Lewis Hyde’s Trickster Makes This World: Myth, Mischief, and Art. Required assignments embrace both critical and creative expression.

Seminars
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Brian Walsh
W 2:30pm-4:20pm

A survey of the lively tradition of putting Shakespeare’s plays on film, from the beginnings of cinema at the close of the nineteenth century to the present day.

Also FILM 475.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1800 with permission of instructor
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

The major Victorian poets, Tennyson and Browning, in the context of the romanticism they inherited and transformed. A selection of other Victorians whose genius or popularity warrants attention, including Morris, the Rossettis, Hardy, Swinburne, Hopkins, and Barrett Browning.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: John Rogers
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

This course will examine utopian fiction from Plato to Borges.  We will begin the semester with a study of the genre’s prime mover, Plato, whose Republic serves as a roadmap for countless subsequent instances of the intricately imagined ideal commonwealth.  From Plato we move to Renaissance England’s Thomas More, whose invention of the word “utopia” and whose ingenious fictional frame in Utopia reestablish the genre’s importance for both the early modern and the modern periods.  Of the early modern utopias that follow More, we will read Campanella’s City of the Sun, Bacon’s New Atlantis, Margaret Cavendish’s Blazing World, and the masterful send-up of the genre, Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels.   We will examine Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward and William Morris’s News from Nowhere as instances of the nineteenth century’s use of the genre as a response to Marx’s Communist Manifesto. Utopia’s twentieth-century afterlife in science fiction, a literary form already apparent in embryonic form in New Atlantis and Blazing World, will be addressed, with a look at Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland, Yevgeny Zamyatin’s We, and several short pieces by Jorge Luis Borges.  We will pursue the intense self-consciousness of the genre and its knowing engagement with others of its kind as we study throughout the semester utopia’s abiding investment in the concerns of social discipline, religion, education, science, marriage, and sex.

Also HUMS 453.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1800 with permission of instructor
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Michael Warner
WF 1:00pm-2:15pm

This course reexamines the literature of the early US from the context of climate change. As we contemplate what kinds of culture might be more sustainable or resilient in the future, it helps to reexamine the paths by which the present crisis—and our awareness of it—arose. The period from the late eighteenth century to the Civil War makes an especially interesting case: it developed the modern concept of the environment, in ways that still shape our consciousness of climate change; but it was also the period in which industrialization and national expansion dramatically altered the continent and the ways of life sustained on it. Where some saw the pastoral utopia of “Nature’s nation,” others saw violent displacement and an unsustainable future. These changes and struggles were so pervasive that they mark every area of the culture, not just nature writing. The class will involve a brief introduction to some current debates about climate change and the humanities, including the Yale Tanner lectures given in 2015 by Dipesh Chakrabarty. Students will then read some work in US environmental history. The primary focus of the class, however, will be the writers of the time, including both classic works by Jefferson, Cooper, Emerson, Fuller, Melville, Thoreau; writings of and about Native Americans, including the rise of the image of the “ecological Indian”; writing about the Prairies and the West, as well as about the new urban environments. A central aim of the course will be to assess the formation and legacy of key ideas in environmentalism, some of which may now be a hindrance as much as a foundation–for example, the idea of nature or wilderness as a primordial equilibrium from which the human is estranged. The course ends with the disclosure, by George P. Marsh’s Man and Nature (1864) that what we describe as nature has already been shaped—often destructively–by human development.

Also AMST 425.

Senior Seminars
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Wai Chee Dimock
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

Nonhuman life forms in fiction and poetry from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first, including plants and animals, “legal persons” such as corporations, large-scale phenomena such as the market and the internet, war and environmental catastrophes, as well as intelligent machines and extraterrestrial aliens. Authors include Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Upton Sinclair, Elizabeth Bishop, Louise Erdrich, Richard Powers, Don Delillo, Cormac McCarthy, Philip K. Dick, Ursula Le Guin, Octavia Butler, Dave Eggers.  Theorists include Georgio Agamben, Jane Bennett, Jacques Derrida, Donna Haraway, H. Katherine Hayles, Fredric Jameson, Brian Matsumi, Timothy Morton.

Also AMST 344/AMST 723

Senior Seminars
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Alastair Minnis
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

A study of Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess, House of Fame, and Legend of Good Women, in addition to substantial selections from his Canterbury Tales. The texts’ relations to the discourses of dissent current in Chaucer’s day, an age of extreme political, social, and intellectual turmoil.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1800
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Robert Stepto
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

This seminar pursues close readings of Ralph Ellison’s essays, short fiction, and novels. The “in context” component of the seminar involves working from the Benston and Sundquist volumes on Ellison to discern a portrait of the modernist African America Ellison investigated, with at least Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and Romare Bearden also in view. Texts include Ellison’s Collected Essays, Flying Home and Other Stories, Invisible Man, and Juneteenth; K. Benston, Speaking for You; E. Sundquist, Cultural Contexts for Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man; and A. Nadel, Invisible Criticism: Ralph Ellison and the American Canon.

Also AFAM 437/AMST 420.

Senior Seminars
American Lit
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Margaret Homans
WF 1:00pm-2:15pm

A study of the major novels and other writings by Virginia Woolf, with additional readings in historical contexts and in Woolf biography and criticism. Focus on Woolf’s modernist formal experimentation and on her responses and contributions to political movements of her day, principally feminism and pacifism; attention also to the critical reception of her work, with emphasis on feminist and queer literary criticism and theory.

Also WGSS 426.

Senior Seminars
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Cynthia Zarin
T 2:30-3:45

Writing of prose at the intermediate level. Daily assignments of c. 300 words, a weekly lecture, and a weekly tutorial. Application forms available on the Web by mid-November. Counts as a nonfiction course in the writing concentration. All undergraduate students are welcome to apply.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Lectures, Creative Writing
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Cynthia Zarin
T 2:30-3:45

Writing of prose at the intermediate level. Daily assignments of c. 300 words, a weekly lecture, and a weekly tutorial. Application forms available on the Web by mid-November. Counts as a nonfiction course in the writing concentration. All undergraduate students are welcome to apply.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Lectures, Creative Writing
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Donald Margulies
T 2:30pm-5:00pm

A seminar and workshop in writing for the stage. Readings include modern American and British plays by Pinter, Mamet, Churchill, Kushner, Williams, and Wilder. Emphasis on play structure, character, and conflict. In addition to weekly exercises, students write a one-act play.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: Your Writing Sample may be in any genre; there is no limit to the length of your Statement of Purpose.

Also THST 320.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Anne Fadiman
Th 2:30-5:20

A seminar and workshop in first-person writing. Students explore a series of themes (e.g., family, love, loss, identity) both by writing about their own lives and by reading British and American memoirs, autobiographies, personal essays, and letters. An older work, usually from the nineteenth or early twentieth century, is paired each week with a more recent one on the same theme.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions:

Please read the course description below, paying special attention to sections highlighted in bold, some of which describe exceptions to the standard application procedure.

This is a reading and writing class–part seminar, part workshop, part lecture–in which students explore a series of themes (including love, loss, family, and identity) both by writing about their own lives and by reading British and American memoirs, autobiographies, letters, and personal essays.

First-person writing is a peculiar blend of candor, catharsis, narcissism, and indiscretion. The purpose of this class is to harness these elements with sufficient rigor and imagination that self-portraiture becomes interesting to others as well as to oneself. An older work, written between the late eighteenth and the mid-twentieth century, will be paired each week with a more recent one on the same theme—a coupling designed to erode the traditional academic boundaries between eras and between “ought” and “want” reading. (For instance, when we consider the theme of love, we will read excerpts from H. G. Wells’s On Loves and the Lover-Shadow and Joyce Maynard’s At Home in the World, and write personal essays on an aspect of love, not necessarily romantic.) Readings will include works by Thomas De Quincey, Joan Didion, Dave Eggers, Lucy Grealy, Mary McCarthy, James Thurber, and Virginia Woolf. Our connections to the readings will be reinforced by several author visits. By writing a thousand-word first-person essay every other week, students will face the same problems the authors in our syllabus have faced, though they may come up with very different solutions. Students will critique each other’s work in class and by e-mail. Each student will have at least six individual conferences with me, most of them an hour long, in which we’ll edit your work together.

Students who wish to apply to “Writing about Oneself” should submit the standard Application for Creative Writing and Journalism Courses to the class’s Drop Box by noon on Wednesday, December 10. Please note the following special instructions for English 455 applications:

                1. The standard application specifies “a” writing sample. Ignore that! I can assess your work better if you submit two samples, totaling 5-15 pages. (If the total length exceeds that, please mark the sections to which I should pay particular attention.) You may even submit three if one is very short (for instance, a Daily Themes one-pager).

           2. If possible, your samples should belong to the same genre we’ll be reading and writing (“non-non”–nonacademic nonfiction). Personal essays, other nonacademic essays, and literary journalism would all be appropriate. In other words, writing about yourself would be welcome but not required. (If fiction is your strength, one but not both of your samples may be a short story. Similarly, if you’re a playwright, one sample may be a scene from a play. The other sample should be non-non.) Choose pieces that give your literary style a thorough airing. Cogency will be valued; interminable tomes will cause me to droop.

           3. Your “statement of purpose” should explain some things your samples won’t tell me. The application suggests “a paragraph,” but you are welcome to write as long a note as you wish. For instance: Why do you want to take the class? What would you contribute to it? What writing experience and honors have you accumulated? (I’ll still consider you if the answer is None and None.) What are you majoring in? (English majors receive no special preference.) Is there anything else that might help me understand you as a writer or a person?

                4. When you list the writing classes you’ve taken, please include the name of the class and the instructor, not just the number.

I am not looking for a particular kind of writer. My ideal class is a mix of experienced journalists and creative writers (usually fiction writers or playwrights), with a couple of students who fit no category but just happen to write beautifully. Although most of its members will likely be juniors and seniors, anyone may apply. There are no prerequisites.

Once English 455 is up on Classesv2, the site may have a bit more information at the bottom of the course description, including the names of a couple of former students who have offered to answer questions about the class.

Creative Writing
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Peter Cole
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Intensive readings in the history and theory of translation paired with practice in translating. Case studies from ancient languages (the Bible, Greek and Latin classics), medieval languages (classical Arabic literature), and modern languages (poetic texts).

Also HUMS 427/JDST 316/LITR 348.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing
HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: John Crowley
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

Practice in all aspects of writing a screenplay. Focus on elements shared with other forms of fiction, including story, character, narrative, personal voice, and audience expectations. Study of one or more published screenplays in conjunction with viewings of the resulting films. Students plan, pitch, outline, and write a large part of a single screenplay, in addition to shorter exercises in screenplay craft.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: Screenplay excerpts are welcomed but not required as application writing samples for this course.

Also FILM 396.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Susan Choi
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2016
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: In your Statement of Purpose, please describe your interest in fiction-writing and in this course in particular.
 

In this workshop, we’ll spend the semester writing a single story, from opening line to revision. I hope to provide the chance for you to better understand, and share, the actual writing process:  to experience first-hand how stories are constructed, reconsidered, and re-constructed.

It is on one hand a traditional workshop, in that we’ll submit, read, and discuss each others’ work; it’s also, on the other hand, an untraditional workshop, in that it focuses on the ways in which each component of a story works, step by step, to build a powerful and moving experience for readers.

We’ll move, weekly, from opening lines to opening paragraphs; from there to a narrative’s initial complication (as in, the thickening of the plot); and etc., until we’ve written entire stories.

We’ll also read fiction, each week, by venerable writers, and talk about how they managed their first lines, their first paragraphs, and etc.  There will be two or three stories per week, and I’ll keep the lengths reasonable – the reading is important, but I want, first and foremost, for you to have time to fully concentrate on your own writing.

We’ll go on, during the second half of the semester, to discussing our completed stories, and from there to discussing second drafts of our stories – it’s true (trust me) that writing is, to a certain degree, re-writing.

The only requirements for this course are a writing sample of 25 pages or less, and a letter about your interest in fiction-writing and in this course in particular.

Your writing sample should, ideally, be one or two short stories or the opening chapter or two of a novel, but I’ll consider poetry and the opening pages of plays as well.  Submitting an expository writing sample is least preferred, but is not out of the question.

Students are not required to have taken previous writing classes or, for that matter, any particular class at all.  The course is open to students at all grade levels.

-Michael Cunningham

Creative Writing
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Bob Woodward
M 2:30pm-4:20pm

Click here to view the syllabus for ENGL 467b.

English 467b is a seminar that examines the practices, methods and impact of journalism. The main attention will be on reporting and writing: How others have done it, what works and what doesn’t. There will be a number of workshops during the seminar sessions to show the students how to improve story drafts and expose the students to best practices in journalism. The course is designed not just for those considering journalism or writing as a career but for anyone hoping to enter a profession in which the validity of new and old information is central to success. That may be almost everyone. Think of the seminar as a class to improve your methods for obtaining, skeptically evaluating and assessing information, and then writing it up for others to read.

Students will read specific articles and books that will be discussed in class and analyzed in occasional short papers.

Fulfills the core seminar requirement for Yale Journalism Scholars. No prerequisites.

Also PLSC 253.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors and seniors. The application will consist of two parts. The first should be a personal statement explaining your interest in the course, your Yale class year, any previous writing courses, your main extra-curricular activities and any journalism or work experience. The second part should be a writing sample–an article that has been published anywhere or a paper you have submitted for a class. The application, which is available on the English department website, should be submitted by noon on December 9 by uploading it to my course site on Classes*v2.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Bob Woodward
M 2:30pm-4:20pm

Click here to view the syllabus for ENGL 467b.

English 467b is a seminar that examines the practices, methods and impact of journalism. The main attention will be on reporting and writing: How others have done it, what works and what doesn’t. There will be a number of workshops during the seminar sessions to show the students how to improve story drafts and expose the students to best practices in journalism. The course is designed not just for those considering journalism or writing as a career but for anyone hoping to enter a profession in which the validity of new and old information is central to success. That may be almost everyone. Think of the seminar as a class to improve your methods for obtaining, skeptically evaluating and assessing information, and then writing it up for others to read.

Students will read specific articles and books that will be discussed in class and analyzed in occasional short papers.

Fulfills the core seminar requirement for Yale Journalism Scholars. No prerequisites.

Also PLSC 253.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Special application instructions: The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors and seniors. The application will consist of two parts. The first should be a personal statement explaining your interest in the course, your Yale class year, any previous writing courses, your main extra-curricular activities and any journalism or work experience. The second part should be a writing sample–an article that has been published anywhere or a paper you have submitted for a class. The application, which is available on the English department website, should be submitted by noon on December 9 by uploading it to my course site on Classes*v2.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Spring
2016

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring
2016

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Mark Oppenheimer
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

The history and practice of writing journalistic essays or articles in which the principal actor is not a person but a notion or idea. Conventions, tropes, and authorial strategies that give rise to the best works work in the genre, focusing on examples from the 20th century, including George Orwell, Hannah Arendt, Tom Wolfe, Renata Adler, and Janet Malcolm. Students write their own example of the journalism of ideas.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Mark Oppenheimer
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

The history and practice of writing journalistic essays or articles in which the principal actor is not a person but a notion or idea. Conventions, tropes, and authorial strategies that give rise to the best works work in the genre, focusing on examples from the 20th century, including George Orwell, Hannah Arendt, Tom Wolfe, Renata Adler, and Janet Malcolm. Students write their own example of the journalism of ideas.

This course requires an application, which is due by Wednesday, December 9, at noon. The standard application form can be found on the Applications and Deadlines page.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR, HU
Term: Spring
2016

Special projects set up by the student in an area of particular interest with the help of a faculty adviser and the director of undergraduate studies, intended to enable the student to cover material not otherwise offered by the department. The course may be used for research or for directed reading, but in either case a term paper or its equivalent is normally required. The student meets regularly with the faculty adviser. To apply for admission, a student must submit an application and prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the office of the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 9, 2015, for spring-term projects and by April 22, 2016, for fall-term projects.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring
2016

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 13, 2015, for Spring 2016 projects and by April 14, 2016, for Fall 2016 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring
2016

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 13, 2015, for Spring 2016 projects and by April 14, 2016, for Fall 2016 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring
2016

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 9, 2015, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 22, 2016, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring
2016

Second term of the optional yearlong senior essay. Students may begin the yearlong essay in the spring term of the junior year, allowing for significant summer research, with permission of the instructor. After ENGL 490.

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 9, 2015, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 22, 2016, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Roberta Frank
W 9:25am-11:15am

A close reading of Beowulf, with some attention to shorter heroic poems.

Also LING 501.

Graduate Seminars
Medieval Lit
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Ian Cornelius
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy and its tradition, with an emphasis on medieval and early modern England. A study of the commentary tradition, major translations, adaptations, and associated literary works. The Old English Boethius (ascribed to King Alfred), Alan of Lille’s Complaint of Nature, commentaries of William of Conches and Nicholas Trevet, Jean de Meun’s Romance of the Rose, Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde, John Walton’s verse translation, Robert Henryson’s Orpheus and Eurydice, Thomas More’s Dialogue of Comfort, and the translation of Queen Elizabeth I. Major topics include textual history, theory and practice of translation, literary form and moral philosophy.

Graduate Seminars
Medieval Lit
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: John Rogers
T 9:25am-11:15am

This course studies Milton’s poetry and some of his controversial prose.  We investigate the relation of the poetry to its historical contexts, focusing on the literary, religious, social, and political forces that shaped Milton’s verse.  We survey and assess some of the dominant issues in contemporary Milton studies, examining the types of readings that psychoanalytic, feminist, Marxist, and historicist critics have produced.  A brief oral report, a term paper (as well as a prospectus and preliminary bibliography for the term paper) required.

Also CPLT 672b.

Graduate Seminars
Early Modern Lit
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: David Bromwich
M 9:25am-11:15am

A partial survey of the political writings of Burke in the context of the theory of empire and of revolution.  We will emphasize his writings on India and France, which reveal a common theme:  innovation—sudden change in a way of life—always depends on violence, whether its agents are internal or external to the society.  We will touch on a wider subject:  the birth of modern ideology, from the demand for systematic excuses to justify empire and revolution.

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2016
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

This is a course on three varieties of ecological representation during the long eighteenth century: countryside, city, and imperial periphery. We’ll look at the role of several major literary genres–georgic, loco-descriptive, satire, the novel, the essay, epic, novel and travel writing–in constituting a sense of place and environment, through developing ideas of landscape, wilderness, or the garden, of stranger sociability and urban publicity, and of the exotic or oceanic or savage. We’ll pay particular attention to the relation between form and phenomenology in the depiction of ecological surround. Writers include Dryden, Wycherley, Rochester, Behn, Addison, Gay, Defoe, Ward, Swift, Haywood, Fielding, Pope, Cook, Boswell, and Burney, read alongside theory and history from Raymond Williams to the Anthropocene.

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

The major Victorian poets, Tennyson and Browning, in the context of the romanticism they inherited and transformed. A selection of other Victorians whose genius or popularity warrants attention, including Morris, the Rossettis, Hardy, Swinburne, Hopkins, and Barrett Browning.

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Ruth Yeazell
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

Case studies in the visual and verbal representation of persons in Anglo-American painting and fiction, with particular attention to novels that themselves include portraits or address relations between the two media.  Novelists tentatively to include Henry Fielding, Jane Austen, Henry James, Edith Wharton, Oscar Wilde, and Virginia Woolf.  Painters to include William Hogarth, Joshua Reynolds, Thomas Lawrence, James McNeill Whistler, John Singer Sargent, and Vanessa Bell.  Selected readings in recent theories of fictional character and in the history and theory of portraiture. Whenever possible, we will draw on paintings in Yale’s collections.

Also HSAR 678.

Graduate Seminars
18th-, 19th-, or 20th-C Lit with permission of instructor
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Wai Chee Dimock
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

Nonhuman life forms in fiction and poetry from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first, including plants and animals, “legal persons” such as corporations, large-scale phenomena such as the market and the internet, war and environmental catastrophes, as well as intelligent machines and extraterrestrial aliens.  Authors include Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Upton Sinclair, Elizabeth Bishop, Louise Erdrich, Richard Powers, Don Delillo, Cormac McCarthy, Philip K. Dick, Ursula Le Guin, Octavia Butler, Dave Eggers.  Theorists include Georgio Agamben, Jane Bennett, Jacques Derrida, Donna Haraway, H. Katherine Hayles, Fredric Jameson, Brian Matsumi, Timothy Morton.

Also AMST 723.

Graduate Seminars
19th- or 20th-Century Lit with permission of instructor
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Caleb Smith
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

Since the late 1960s, the U.S. prison system has expanded with unprecedented speed to become the largest in the world. Prisons, once seen as marginal zones of resocialization or containment for an unassimilable few, now appear central to the American political and social orders; we find ourselves in the presence of what critics have called “mass incarceration,” the “penal state,” and a “prison society” organized around a “new Jim Crow.” This seminar considers two intellectual traditions that have emerged in opposition to the new system—an interdisciplinary field of critical prison studies and a canon of prison literature. Approaching the prison from multiple perspectives, we read works in history (Foucault, Rothman); law (Feeley and Simon, Alexander); social science (Gilmore, Wacquant); and cultural studies (Rodriguez, Davis); as well as literary works by incarcerated and formerly incarcerated writers (Reed, Jackson, Baca). Key problems for discussion include disciplinary subject-formation and dehumanization, unfree labor and racialization, biopolitics and neoliberal governmentality, and the politics and poetics of literary testimony.

Also AMST 622.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Stephanie Newell
T 9:25am-11:15am

This course approaches the study of African cities and urbanization through the medium of diverse texts, including fiction, non-fiction, popular culture, film and the arts as well as scholarly work on African cities. Through these cultural “texts,” attention will be given to everyday conceptualizations of the body and the environment, as well as to theoretical engagements with the African city. We will study urban relationships as depicted in literature and popular media in relation to Africa’s long history of intercultural encounters, including materials dating back to the 1880s and the 1930s.

Also AFAM 850.

Graduate Seminars
19th- or 20th-Century Lit with permission of instructor
Term: Spring
2016
W 9:25am-11:15am

An examination of mid-twentieth-century African American literature and the rise of anti-Communist liberalism in American politics and life. We consider how black-authored fiction, drama, and poetry retheorized liberalism’s tenets of agency, subjectivity, property, autonomy, sociality, and governmentality. Rather than accept the persuasive and oft-argued position that black literature published during these decades was “integrationist” and therefore politically suspect, this course interrogates the aesthetic and political ends that the “black liberal imagination” served during these critical decades and into our present day cultural moment.

Also AFAM 613, AMST 733.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Robert Stepto
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

This seminar pursues close readings of Ralph Ellison’s essays, short fiction, and novels. The “in context” component of the seminar involves working from the Benston and Sundquist volumes on Ellison to discern a portrait of the modernist African America Ellison investigated, with at least Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and Romare Bearden also in view. Texts include Ellison’s Collected Essays, Flying Home and Other Stories, Invisible Man, and Juneteenth; K. Benston, Speaking for You; E. Sundquist, Cultural Contexts for Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man; and A. Nadel, Invisible Criticism: Ralph Ellison and the American Canon.

Also AFAM 563, AMST 651.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2016
Professor: Robert Stepto
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

Visual art in African American books since 1900. Artists include Winold Reiss, Aaron Douglas, E.S. Campbell, Tom Feelings, and the FSA photographers of the 1930s and ’40s. Topics include Harlem Renaissance book art, photography and literature, and children’s books. Research in collections of the Beinecke Library and the Yale Art Gallery is encouraged.

Also AFAM 743, AMST 654.

Graduate Seminars
20th-Century Lit
Term: Spring
2016

Designed to help fill gaps in students programs when there are corresponding gaps in the department’s offerings. By arrangement with faculty and with the approval of the DGS.

Graduate Seminars
Term: Spring
2016