Courses

Professor: Stephanie Newell
TTh 11.35pm-12.50pm

An introduction to creative writing published in South Africa between the end of Apartheid in 1994 and the present. Close readings of contemporary fiction with additional material drawn from popular culture, including films, magazines, and music. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Also AFST 015

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Heather Klemann
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What is childhood for so-called born digital generations? This course explores how developments in technology and communication from toddlers with touchscreens to Pokémon Go! reconfigure cultural constructions of and dearly held beliefs about youth.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Jordan Brower
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

How do movies relate to the world from which they emanate? We will grapple with this question as we study the art and industry of Hollywood, ranging from its Classical period to the present day.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Andrew Brown
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Animals provide us with food, labor, entertainment, and comfort—but what do we owe them in return? This course examines the boundaries between the animal and the human and explores how these relationships inform diverse social, political, and cultural issues.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Janice Carlisle
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

The world does not come to us through sights that are as fully formed or instantaneously meaningful as we typically think. This course therefore examines the physical, mental, and cultural processes of visual construction that determine what and how we see.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Margaret Deli
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

In a society as obsessed with celebrity as ours is today, what does the rise of Instagram, Snapchat, and all things Kardashian tell us about the way we live now? In this class, we’ll explore the conception and consumption of fame—and challenge ourselves to explain why certain names, faces, and bodies are elevated above others.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
MW 9.00am-10.15am

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

We will engage in a critical analysis of American sport as a means of studying the distribution of power in society. Topics include representation, the commodification of athletes, and the construction of gender, race, and class in American culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Jami Carlacio
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

In a democratic society, the media are expected to create an informed citizenry able to debate issues in the public sphere. Are they doing their job? We will investigate how the media shape public opinion in the digital age.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Briallen Hopper
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What is the role of religion in American life? How does religion affect American politics, art, and popular culture? We will read and write about answers to these questions from history, sociology, gender studies, film studies, and politics.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Ann Killian
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Can nonviolent resistance overcome injustice in all political situations? This course explores practices of nonviolence alongside real-world strategies for addressing humanitarian crises and structural violence. Topics include civil disobedience in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, Occupy, and Black Lives Matter.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Andrew Willson
TTh 4.00pm-5.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

An investigation into the influence of consumerism and economics on American culture and society. Topics include advertising, technology, art, and societal change. Readings range from academic theory to cultural criticism to The Great Gatsby.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

The ideal of equality haunts debates concerning the political organization of social life.  This course examines key texts that shaped this ideal in order to pose the question of how – or whether – equality opposes inequality today.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
WF 1.00pm-2.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

From bodybuilding to cannabis use, from queerness to witchcraft, a number of behaviors have been declared to be “deviant.” What makes them deviant? Who decides? This seminar explores deviance through theoretical approaches and case studies.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Bofang Li
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Do you covet a spot on Taylor’s #Squad? Are you a card-carrying member of the Beyhive? Did you scream for a glimpse of Lin at #Ham4Ham? This course looks at the formation, expression, and practices of fan culture in a variety of modern fandoms.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Bofang Li
TTh 4.00pm-5.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Do you covet a spot on Taylor’s #Squad? Are you a card-carrying member of the Beyhive? Did you scream for a glimpse of Lin at #Ham4Ham? This course looks at the formation, expression, and practices of fan culture in a variety of modern fandoms.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Katja Lindskog
TTh 9.00am-10.15am

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What is beauty? How do we define it? The course will approach beauty with a specific inquiry in mind: what can we learn by looking at what is considered beautiful in a particular time and place?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Katja Lindskog
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What is beauty? How do we define it? The course will approach beauty with a specific inquiry in mind: what can we learn by looking at what is considered beautiful in a particular time and place?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Scarlet Luk
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

How did we get queer? And where do we go from here? This course will offer a selection of queer writings, theories, and its discontents.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Yahel Matalon
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Ideas like proof and evidence often seem simple, but how we understand them is shaped by many factors, from personal experience to social context. This course will examine proof and objectivity from a variety of perspectives, questioning how they shape our reality and vice versa.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Pamela Newton
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Travel shapes the way we see the world and understand our place within it. This course explores what we gain and what we lose by becoming travelers and/or tourists.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Jordan Brower
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

This course will investigate some of the most pressing social issues of today – race and activism, gender equality, labor rights, globalization, and more – as they are refracted through the prism of America’s greatest game.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Divine intervention, nuclear annihilation, climate change, pandemic. How the world ends is unknown, but central to the stories we tell and our imagined role in the universe. Students will analyze ideas about apocalypse and test their thoughts about the End.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Alexandra Reider
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

From rock and roll and emoji to secret codes and bilingualism, this course looks at the way language creates communities and the way communities, in turn, create and regulate language.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Timothy Robinson
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What right does any authority have to control expression?  This writing seminar will treat legal and critical debates from recent times, as well as various arguments concerning politics, artistic freedom, and religion, ranging from those of Plato to Tipper Gore.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Jami Carlacio
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

In a democratic society, the media are expected to create an informed citizenry able to debate issues in the public sphere. Are they doing their job? We will investigate how the media shape public opinion in the digital age.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Joseph Stadolnik
WF 11.35am-12.50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What does soccer mean to those who play it and watch it around the world? This course delves into the history and politics of soccer from Victorian Britain to its global present.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

This class will consider why the Farm Bill, an almost invisible piece of legislation for food policy, has such far-reaching implications and whether the industrial agriculture that feeds our nation has failed us. We will discuss how best to effect change in our food system.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What counts as real science? On whose authority? How can non-scientists evaluate political claims expressed in scientific rhetoric? Examining topics like objectivity, culture and ethics, this seminar investigates the role of science in democratic societies.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Emily Ulrich
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Is chivalry really dead? Should it be? This course explores the power structures underpinning chivalry, investigating its ongoing appeal as well as its role in the marginalization of certain peoples.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
MW 4.00pm-5.15pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

What counts as real science? On whose authority? How can non-scientists evaluate political claims expressed in scientific rhetoric? Examining topics like objectivity, culture and ethics, this seminar investigates the role of science in democratic societies.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

The ideal of equality haunts debates concerning the political organization of social life. This writing course examines key texts that shaped this ideal in order to pose the question of how – or whether – equality opposes inequality today.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Ryan Wepler
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.  The titles, times, and descriptions are forthcoming.

Can reading good literature make you a good person? Does encountering art that challenges your certainties, broadens your experience, and probes the limits of existence make you more sensitive to your own personhood and the humanity of others? In this course we will consider what makes literature good and how good literature moves us. Our collective goal will not just be to produce a theory of good literature, but to experience its goodness, to develop your capacity to be moved by a literary work and reflect on what happened to you during that process. Readings range from popular successes to great masterpieces and include: Mrs. Dalloway (Woolf), Invisible Man (Ellison); short fiction and excerpts by Sir. Arthur Conan Doyle, Mark Twain, Flannery O’Connor, O Henry, Jorge Luis Borges, Kurt Vonnegut, Karen Russell, George Saunders, and E. L. James; selected poetry; and one of the Harry Potter films.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Gina Hurley
TTh 11.35pm-12.50pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

What do Satan and Pinocchio have in common?

They’re both pretty good liars. 

Whether by adopting a false identity, committing a lie of omission, or framing someone for a crime they didn’t commit, there are many ways to tell a lie. More interesting, however, are the reasons that people do it. While exploring different kinds of liars and their lies, we’ll encounter motivations that range from selfish to self-sacrificing: a bereft son hopes to avenge his father’s murder; a young man wants to live his big brother’s life; a brave woman seeks to expose the crimes of a tyrannical regime. In getting to know these liars and many others, we will ask what sorts of truths lies can reveal about their tellers and the society in which they live.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.  The title and description is forthcoming.

Few social issues are more pivotal today than those that animate the Black Lives Matter movement. Those issues have a long history, however, in art as well as politics. Indeed, the historical devaluation of black life casts a long shadow over the formation of Anglo-American literature. From the era of slavery to what many theorists view as the racialized expansion of the US prison system in recent decades, black life has been a major if often marginalized force shaping literary history. At the same time, literature has often been a proving ground for competing forms of antiracist politics. This course explores that force and those forms through a broad overview spanning from Shakespeare’s Othello to recent writings by Toni Morrison, Fred Moten, and Claudia Rankine. Along the way we will also take up work by writers such as Frederick Douglas, James Weldon Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Ralph Ellison, Assata Shakur, Jayne Cortez, Amiri Baraka, and Wanda Coleman.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

More than a millennium ago in England, an anonymous poet wrote that ‘there are as many views as people on the earth; each has a mind of his own’.  Modern science agrees, suggesting that none of us is capable of being fully objective.  How, then, can we recognize the limitations of our own perceptions and find common ground?

This course examines works of literature that use multiple perspectives to trouble our understanding of the truth. We will view the world through the eyes of an inkwell, consider what a marbled page has to say about literature, and read irreconcilable witness accounts of the same murder - including the testimony of the victim’s ghost.  Drawn from diverse genres, literary traditions, and historical periods, the readings in this course will make us question how we see the world.  We will explore what seeing things from other perspectives tells us about our own assumptions, and ask how we can convince others - or even ourselves - to see things differently.
 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Andrew Ehrgood
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Kim Shirkhani
TTh 9.00am-10.15am

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: David Gorin
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Andrew Willson
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Briallen Hopper
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Adam Reid Sexton
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Mark Oppenheimer
MW 9.00am-10.15am

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Shifra Sharlin
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Shifra Sharlin
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Kim Shirkhani
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Richard Deming
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Richard Deming
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Kimberly Andrews
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Danielle Chapman
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Danielle Chapman
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Derek Green
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Derek Green
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Jessica Brantley
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Lawrence Manley
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Alastair Minnis
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Alastair Minnis
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm
An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.
 
 
Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of five poets from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries: Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, T.S. Eliot and Louise Glück (in the fall). Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Sunny Xiang
MW 11.35am-12.50pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Ellison, Baldwin, McKay, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Bishop, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, Rankine, E. P. Jones.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Sunny Xiang
MW 9.00am-10.15am

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Ellison, Baldwin, McKay, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Bishop, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, Rankine, E. P. Jones.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
TTh 9.00am-10.15am

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Ellison, Baldwin, McKay, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Bishop, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, Rankine, E. P. Jones.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Brandon Menke
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Ellison, Baldwin, McKay, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Bishop, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, Rankine, E. P. Jones.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.  The times and expanded description are forthcoming.

Section 01 - Timothy Robinson TTh 9.00am-10.15am
Section 02 - Yukai Li MW 1.00pm-2.15pm
Section 03 - Brad Holden MW 2.30pm-3.45

Also LITR 129.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Timothy Robinson
TTh 9.00am-10.15am

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Also LITR 168

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Yukai Li
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Also LITR 168

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Robert Holden
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Also LITR 168

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Adam Reid Sexton
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Fundamentals of the craft of fiction writing explored through readings from classic and contemporary short stories and novels. Focus on how each author has used the fundamentals of craft. Writing exercises emphasize elements such as voice, structure, point of view, character, and tone.

No advance application required.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: David Gorin
T 2:30pm-4:30pm

An introduction to reading and writing poetry. Classic examples from Shakespeare and Milton, the modernist poetics of Stein, Pound, Moore, and Stevens, and recent work in a variety of forms and traditions. Students develop a portfolio of poems and write an essay on the poetic craft of poets who have influenced their work.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome.

No advance application is required for this course.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Roberta Frank
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

An introduction to the literature and culture of earliest England. A selection of prose and verse, including riddles, heroic poetry, meditations on loss, a dream vision, and excerpts from Beowulf, read in the original old English.

Also LING 150

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: R. John Williams
MW 1.30pm-2.20pm

A literary and historical introduction to the period, and set of ideals, known as “the counterculture.”

Lectures
American Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Kathryn James
Th 1.30pm-3.20pm

The influence of the book in Britain from 1475 to 1660, including both manuscript and print formats. The book as material, cultural, and political object; its role in religious, political, and social transformations of the period. Focus on objects from Yale’s British history and art collections.

Also HIST 212

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: David Kastan
TTh 2.30pm-3.20pm

A study of Shakespeare’s histories and tragedies, focusing on attentive reading of the play texts and consideration of the theatrical, literary, intellectual, political, and social worlds in which the plays were written, performed, and experienced.

Lectures
Pre-1800 Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Lawrence Manley
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

A study of Shakespeare’s Tempest in relation to its ancient and contemporary sources and its extensive influence on literature (poems, drama, fiction, essays), the arts (film, opera, visual arts), and cultural theory from the seventeenth century to the present.  Examples from Europe, The Americas, Africa, and Asia.

Also HUMS 403

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit w/ permission
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: David Bromwich
MW 1.00pm-2.15pm

Reading and interpretation of selected histories and tragedies from Richard II to Coriolanus with emphasis on the tension between individual freedom and political obligation.

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Marc Robinson
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

Intensive study of the major playwrights of modern European drama—Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, Brecht, and Beckett—along with pertinent theater theory.

Also THST 390

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Jill Campbell
TTh 1.00pm-2.15pm

Construction of race and gender in literatures of Great Britain, North America, and the Caribbean from the late seventeenth to the early nineteenth century. Focus on the role of literature in advancing and contesting concepts of race and gender as features of identity and systems of power, with particular attention to the circulation of goods, people, ideas, and literary works among regions. Some authors include Aphra Behn, Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, Leanora Sansay, Maria Edgeworth, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Mary Shelley. First of a two-term sequence; each term may be taken independently.

Also WGSS 223

Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Stephanie Newell
T 9.25am-11.15am

Introduction to a variety of literary, oral, and visual narratives by artists from countries as diverse as Egypt, Ghana, Nigeria, Sudan, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. Integration of literary and sociological approaches to African texts.

Also SOCY 317

Seminars
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Claudia Rankine
M 3.30pm-5.20pm

This course will be an interdisciplinary approach to examining our understanding of whiteness. We will discuss whiteness as a culturally constructed and economic incorporated entity, which touches upon and assigns value to nearly every aspect of American life and culture.

Also AFAM 232.

Seminars
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: James Berger
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

Attempts since the late nineteenth century to imagine, in literature, cinema, and social theory, a world different from the existing world. The merging of political critique with desire and anxiety; the nature and effects of social power; forms of authority, submission, and resistance.Als

Also AMST 330

Seminars
American Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: John Crowley
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Amity Gaige
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Instructor:
Amity Gaige

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Louise Glück
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar workshop for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Yale. Preference given to freshmen and sophomores.

Admission to writing courses is by application and is based chiefly on work submitted by the student.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: Students should submit a sample of their own work, if it exists; in addition, all applicants should submit a paragraph on a literary work of any kind, any period: the choice should reflect personal admiration.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

A workshop on journalistic strategies for looking at and writing about contemporary paintings of the human figure. Practitioners and theorists of figurative painting; controversies, partisans, and opponents. Includes field trips to museums and galleries in New York City.

No advance application is required for this course.

Also HSAR 460.

Creative Writing
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 11.35pm-12.50pm

Introduction to the work of Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats, with some attention to Byron, to the poets’ own problematic revisions, and to the minor poets of this rich period of poetic innovation and revolutionary spirit.

Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Paul Fry
Th 3.30pm-5.20pm

Defenses of poetry’s “ancient quarrel” with philosophy, science, and history. Readings in Plato, Aristotle, Sidney, Rousseau, Kant, Wordsworth, Peacock and Shelley, Arnold, Benjamin and Adorno, Heidegger, Cleanth Brooks, Jakobson, Kristeva, De Man; defenses in verse by Donne, Keats, Stevens, Moore and Bishop.

Also HUMS 154

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Brian Seibert
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

A seminar and workshop in writing about the human body in motion, with a focus on the art of dance. Close reading of exemplary dance writing from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The challenges and possibilities of writing artfully about nonverbal expression. Students use a variety of approaches to write about dance and other performance genres.

Prerequisites: No previous knowledge of dance required.

No advance application required. A brief statement of interest will be requested in the first class.

Also THST 244.

About the Instructor: Brian Seibert is a dance critic for the New York Times and just published a book called What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing. The course will not draw exclusively on dance writers, but include poets, novelists, and theorists, as well.

Creative Writing
WR, HU
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Thy Phu
Th 9.25am-11.15am

Narrative literature as a means through which the concept of refuge and the subject of the refugee emerge. Reflection on and challenge of official stories about Canada’s inclusiveness and open door policy. Topics include: redemption, success, and gratitude; themes of loss and ingratitude; literary spaces that such fictions inhabit; and the seemingly minor figure of the refugee. Readings include works by  Dionne Brand, Rawi Hage, Thomas King, Wajdi Mouawad, Alice Munro, Souvankha Thammavongsa, Madeleine Thien, and Kim Thúy.

Expanded course description:
In 1951, the UNHCR ratified the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, a landmark document that defined the refugee, what his or her rights are, and the responsibilities of states with respect to claims for asylum. Significantly, the document also highlights the importance of narrative as a means of making visible the figure of the refugee. Taking inspiration from the legal embrace of narrative, this course explores how literature offers a means of understanding the concept of refuge and the subject of the refugee.
Contemporary Canadian writing offers a particularly rich resource for this exploration: not only does it boast a thriving immigrant literary tradition, but also some the most exciting recent publications exemplify “fictions of refuge.” Through close readings of select fictions of refuge, including short stories, poems, plays, and novels by Canada’s most prominent contemporary writers, which we will put into dialogue with excerpts from essays on critical refugee studies, this course will consider conventions of refugee narratives including:
redemption, success and gratitude; the ways that writers challenge these conventions through emphasis on themes of loss and ingratitude; the literary spaces that such fictions inhabit; the major literary tropes that bring into focus the seemingly “minor” figure of the refugee and his or her racialization; and the ways that the refugee might serve and unsettle settler colonial interests. The fictions of refuge we will look at include (but are by no means limited to) works by Carmen Aguirre, Dionne Brand, Rawi Hage, Thomas King, Yann
Martel, Wajdi Mouawad, Souvankha Thammavongsa, Madeleine Thien, and Kim Thúy, among others.

Course Objectives:
Students in this course will learn to analyze contemporary Canadian literature; to summarize and synthesis essays in critical refugee studies; and to develop skills in oral presentation and essay writing.

Evaluation:
Attendance and participation 15%
Group presentation (30 minutes) 20%
Reading responses (throughout the semester) 20%
Participation in author visit and attendance at public reading (Nov. 3rd) 10%
Summary and 4-page critical response to Sites of Refuge symposium (Nov. 4th) 5%
End-of-term essay (12-15 pages) 30%

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Michael Warner
MW 11.35pm-12.50pm

This course is an introduction to the broad variety of writing leading up to and through the Civil War. We will read works in popular genres as well as the great writers of the period:  Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson. We will look at the growth of African-American writing in the context of antislavery; the development of a national book market and its association with national culture; the emergence of a language of environment; dilemmas of Romantic ecology and American pastoral; the emergence of the “ecological Indian” in the period of removal; the dynamic relation between evangelicalism and the secular; sentimentalism and gender; the emergence of sexuality; and the range of poetics from Bryant to Dickinson.

Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit, American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Langdon Hammer
TTh 1.30pm-2.20pm

Poets and poetic movements from the second half of the twentieth century in the United States, England, Ireland, and the Caribbean. Authors include Bishop, Lowell, O’Hara, Ginsberg, Plath, Ashbery, Merrill, Larkin, Gunn, Hill, Heaney, Muldoon, and Walcott.

Lectures
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
TTh 2.30pm-3.45pm

In-depth examination of James Baldwin’s canon, tracking his work as an American artist, citizen, and witness to United States society, politics, and culture during the Civil Rights and Black Arts Movements.

Prerequisite: Background or course work in twentieth century African American history, African American literature, and/or American literature helpful but not required.

Also AFAM 386/HUMS 456

Seminars
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Joseph Roach
TTh 11.35am-12.50pm

Classical rhetoric, from Demosthenes to the digital age: the theory and practice of persuasive public speaking and speech writing.  Open to junior and senior Theater Studies majors, and to nonmajors with permission of the instructor. Students must preregister during the reading period of the preceding term.

Also THST 291

Seminars
Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Ruth Yeazell
Th 1.30pm-3.20pm

Close study of selected novels by Jane Austen, George Eliot, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf, with particular attention to the representation of consciousness and the development of free indirect discourse, as well as recent speculations about so-called theory of mind. Readings supplemented by narrative theory.

Also WGSS 170

Seminars
Pre-1900 w/ permission
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Joseph North
MW 11.35pm-12.50pm

Intensive close reading of selected 20th and 21st Century lyric poetry, with the aim of coming to recognize our own political sensibilities, as well as working to expand them into new depths and ranges.   Poets include Seamus Heaney, Dylan Thomas, W.B. Yeats, W.H. Auden, Lesbia Harford, Pablo Neruda, Bertolt Brecht, Frank O’Hara, Wislawa Szymborska, Edith Södergran, and Audre Lorde.

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: J. D. McClatchy
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

A selective survey of the genre from its seventeenth-century Italian origins to the present day. The libretto’s history, from opera seria to opéra comique to melodrama, featuring libretti by Hofmannsthal, W. S. Gilbert, and Auden. Emphasis on literary adaptations, from Da Ponte and Beaumarchais to Britten and Thomas Mann. Source material includes works by Shakespeare, Schiller, Hugo, Melville, and Tennessee Williams.

Readings in English; musical background not required.

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
W 3.30pm-5.20pm

Historical survey of feminist and queer theory from the Enlightenment to the present, with readings from key British, French, and American works. Focus on the foundations and development of contemporary theory. Shared intellectual origins and concepts, as well as divergences and conflicts, among different ways of approaching gender and sexuality.

Also WGSS 340

Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: John Rogers

A survey of seventeenth-century poetry and prose, exclusive of Milton. Authors include poets Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, and Rochester; playwrights Webster and Ford; philosophers Bacon, Hobbes, and Locke; essayists Burton and Browne; and fiction writers Cavendish, Bunyan, and Behn.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
T 1.30pm-3.40pm

Meeting in the Yale Center for British Art, this seminar examines Dickens’s fiction in relation to traditions of British art. Novels spanning his career range from The Old Curiosity Shop to Bleak House and Great Expectations.  Art objects to be studied (engravings, watercolors, and oil paintings) include eighteenth-century portraits and progresses, as well as works by such Victorian artists as the Pre-Raphaelites Millais, Holman Hunt, and Rossetti, along with Frith, Madox Brown, and Turner.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Michael Warner
MW 2.30pm-3.45pm

Covering the period after modernism (Stein, Woolf, Proust) and before Stonewall, this course traces the literature of queerness in a time when it was not yet stabilized by lesbian and gay identity. Readings include fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama, on both sides of the Atlantic. Major authors include Isherwood, Auden, Genet, Highsmith, Jane Bowles, Burroughs, Ginsberg, O’Hara, Bishop, Nabokov, Baldwin, Vidal, and Orton.

Also WGSS 440

Senior Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Caryl Phillips
M 2.30pm-4.20pm

Study of the various ways in which contemporary literature has represented the encounter between the center and the periphery, with special attention paid to how this operates in the context of the British Empire.

Senior Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Wai Chee Dimock
W 1.30pm-3.20pm

Explore the vibrant openness of New York, Chicago, and San Francisco through study of geographies invoked, literary genres experimented with, sights and sounds produced, collective pasts recalled, and collective futures intimated. Readings examine Upton Sinclair’s immigrant labor force in The Jungle; Teju Cole’s interweaving of Africa, Europe, and America in Open City; the detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett; the science fiction of Philip K. Dick; the poetry of Carl Sandburg; and the generational sagas of Sandra Cisneros, Julia Alvarez, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Amy Tan.

Also AMST 478

Senior Seminars
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: J. D. McClatchy
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

A study of the writing of verse through a consideration of its use in a range of poems and through weekly assignments.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Donald Margulies
T 2:30pm-5:00pm

A seminar and workshop in writing for the stage. Readings include modern American and British plays by Pinter, Mamet, Churchill, Kushner, Williams, and Wilder. Emphasis on play structure, character, and conflict. In addition to weekly exercises, students write a one-act play.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: Your Writing Sample may be in any genre; there is no limit to the length of your Statement of Purpose.

Also THST 320.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Sarah Stillman
M 1:30pm-4:00pm

A nonfiction workshop, confronting the challenges of journalism as an art. Emphasis on voice and structure. Study of texts that may suggest modes, voices, forms, and styles for nonfiction pieces. Frequent writing projects and revisions.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: Students who wish to apply to English 454 should submit the standard Application for Writing Courses to the Drop Box of the English Student Resources site on Classes*v2 by noon on Wednesday, August 17. Please note the following special instructions for English 454 applications:

1. Writing Samples:

The standard application asks students to provide “a writing sample of…about 4500 words of prose.” Here is my permission – in fact, my explicit encouragement – to ignore that limit. I will be better equipped to assess your work if you provide two writing samples, rather than one. Ideally, your samples will amount to 5-15 pages in total, but if they exceed that length, please highlight specific sections on which you’d like me to focus. A third sample is permissible, if it is quite short – for instance, a Daily Themes one-pager.

What sort of work should you submit? Ideally, your samples will reflect the genre of work we’ll be pursuing in the class: non-fiction writing, of the sort that lets your unique style, reportorial passions, and authorial voice stand out. You might consider offering up an example of journalistic work you’ve produced for a campus publication, but you needn’t be intimated if you don’t have published clips (really). Personal essays will do the trick, as will works of literary journalism and non-academic storytelling – writing samples that will help me to consider, where possible, your capacity for innovation in the realm of structure or voice. (Fiction submissions aren’t encouraged, but if you feel that short stories are your strong suit, at least one sample can fall into the fictional camp; prose poetry or some other creative form, too, could make for a brief third sample.)

2. Your “statement of purpose,” and proposals for work to write this term

In your “statement of purpose,” you should, again, feel free to disregard the suggested word count (“a short paragraph”); please write as much as you’d like. I would love to learn more about what draws you to the class; what you’re majoring in (and/or what topics constitute your obsessions); what might help me understand you as a writer and as a person; what kinds of reporting projects excite you (ones you’ve pursued in the past, or hope to chase in the future – or even works of reportage by other journalists you admire).  

Perhaps most importantly: please consider describing, here, a proposal or two for work you would like to pursue this term. You are invited to review the past work for this course and, by using those pieces as an indicator for what this course gives students a chance to create, to offer preliminary proposals for writing in the coming term. Work written by past students, much of it published after the semester’s completion, is available via the previous English 454 Reader, from Professor Fred Strebeigh’s iteration of the course:

https://webspace.yale.edu/engl454a/reader.html

 (Please note that the above link is housed on Professor Strebeigh’s site built for previous generations of English 454; be aware that the syllabus, assignment deadlines, required readings, and more will all be reworked for the Fall 2016 version of the course. Nonetheless, the online reader remains a trove of inspiring work and creative resources! Soon, we are likely to have an updated version of the site for our course community, with the new syllabus and more.)

3. “Writing Courses Previously Taken”

In this segment of your application, please provide not only the course number, but also the course name and instructor.

I look forward to reading your applications, and to getting acquainted with all of you as writers and thinkers!

Creative Writing
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Louise Glück
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

A seminar and workshop in the writing of verse. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: none.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Caryl Phillips
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Cynthia Zarin
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar and workshop in the contemporary essay. Public versus private voice, the responsibilities of the essayist, and the evolution of writing in the first person. Readings include essays by Joan Didion, Jonathan Lethem, Jenny Diski, Zadie Smith, M. F. K. Fisher, Bruce Chatwin, John Berger, and Oliver Sacks.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Special application instructions: none. (This overrides the application).

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Steven Brill
M 9:00-10:50

ENGLISH 467A: JOURNALISM
Steven Brill ● sb@brillbusiness.com ● (212) 332-6301
Fall 2016

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar – the core course for Yale Journalism Scholars – is for those interested in understanding the changing role of journalism, in coming to grips with the challenges and opportunities related to the business model of journalism in a digital, global age, and in learning the practice of journalism. Grades will be based on participation and written work, with an emphasis on the final project.

An emphasis will be placed on both imaginative and critical thinking as it applies to reporting and to creating ways and forms of telling a story so that it has maximum impact in a world cluttered with media and experiencing profound challenges to making journalism economically viable.

One or perhaps two extra (and voluntary) sessions will take place in New York City, so that students can meet with working journalists there.

I will meet with each student individually during the term as often as necessary in order to provide feedback, help with the final project, and (if requested) provide career guidance.

Guest instructors during two of the sessions will be Bob Woodward and Gay Talese.

Successful completion of this course and other aspects of the Yale Journalism Scholars program will qualify students to be designated Yale Journalism Scholars. For more information on the Yale Journalism Scholars and the Yale Journalism Initiative, see http://www.yale.edu/writing/journalism.
 
INSTRUCTOR:  Steven Brill, a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School, worked as a writer for New York Magazine, Esquire, and Harpers while in Law School. In 1978 he was the author of a best-selling book on the Teamsters Union. A year later, he launched The American Lawyer Magazine and later expanded it into ten legal publications across the country. In 1991 Brill launched Court TV and, in 1998, Brill’s Content Magazine. In 2002, Brill wrote a series of columns in Newsweek about America’s response to September 11, as well as After: The Rebuilding and Defending of America in the September 12 Era, which was published in 2003 by Simon & Schuster. In 2009, he founded Journalism Online, LLC, to enable newspapers, magazines, and online publishers to earn revenue from the journalism they publish online. In the last four years he has also written feature articles for The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, and TIME. In 2011, he wrote Class Warfare: Inside the Fight To Fix America’s Schools. He is also a weekly columnist for Reuters. In 2013, he authored a special edition of TIME Magazine – “Bitter Pill: How Medical Bills Are Killing Us” – about healthcare prices and profits. His book about American healthcare and the fight over Obamacare was published in early 2015 by Random House. His serialized story published in The Huffington Post in 2015 of how a major drug company marketed an anti-psychotic drug illegally to children and the elderly – “America’s Most Admired Law Breaker” – is being developed as a television series.

MEETINGS:  Mondays, 9:00 – 10:50 a.m. in LC 103

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS:  The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. In general, we are looking for a range of students – some with demonstrated commitment to and experience in journalism, others without that background but who can write well, want to learn, and perhaps have an added dimension to offer in class discussions (such as an intense interest in politics, the arts, law, or economics), which they might want to apply to journalism.

Admission:

Each student must submit the following simple, two-part application package to sb@brillbusiness.com. I prefer that you submit the package by the evening of Monday, September 5, 2016.

If you want to submit your application earlier, you can submit it any time after August 15 – and in some cases I will admit students early who do so. If there are 15 well qualified applicants from among those applying early, I will send notice that the application process has closed as soon as it has.

However, if you first want to visit the introductory class on Friday, September 2 (which is the substitute for the regular Monday class because of Labor Day), that is fine.

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN by 11:59 PM on Monday, September 5.  I will post with the English Department the final list of those accepted by Wednesday, September 7, if not earlier.

The two-part application should consist of:

1.    No more than two double-spaced pages: A written statement explaining your interest in the class and in the Yale Journalism Scholars program. This should also include your Yale class year, any previous writing courses that you have taken, a brief description of your extra-curricular activities and a description of your journalism experience.

2.    One writing sample – either an article that you have published in an on- or off- campus publication or something that you submitted for a class.

READINGS:  The syllabus provides an outline of what we will cover in the course.  The course packet is available at TYCO, and all books are available at the Yale bookstore. Most of the reading will be from the “Other Reading” materials described below, supplemented by these books:

BOOKS:  John Hersey, Hiroshima
             James Stewart, Follow the Story: How to Write Successful Non-Fiction
             Gay Talese, The Gay Talese Reader
             Steven Brill, America’s Bitter Pill – to be handed out in class.

OTHER READING:

Various newspaper articles, magazine pieces and online postings intended to illustrate different forms and methods (and successes and failures of) journalism, ranging from Woodward and Bernstein’s original Watergate reporting, to celebrity profiles, to bulletins on Supreme Court decisions, to data-centric journalism at ProPublica. (All assembled in the course packet.)

ASSIGNMENTS:

•    Biographical profile – 2,000 words – of the person sitting next to you in this seminar.
•    Critiquing and editing of several published articles from time to time.
•    Coming to class with one original story idea every other week.
•    Filing three online reports and one final report in one day (that you pick) about a story unfolding on the Yale campus.
•    Writing a two-page strategic outline for an interview with a potentially hostile source.
•    Creating, with two partners, a viable path for one of the three students in the group for a career in journalism.
•    Final Assignment: 3,500-4,000 word publishable magazine (or e-magazine) feature story or three-part newspaper series – to be edited by one of your classmates before final submission to me.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: Because we will regularly discuss current journalism, all participants in the program should be prepared to bring a laptop or tablet to class.

OUTLINE OF READING AND ASSIGNMENTS
September 2, 2016: Introduction: In-class discussion of what the seminar will attempt to do and what is expected of participants.

Application for admission to class WILL THEN BE due September 5, 2016 by 11:59 pm, unless applications have already closed.

Admission decisions will be distributed by email by September 7, 2016 at the latest. Please complete the reading for September 12, 2016 before the class.
 _____________________________________________________________________________

Printable version

SYLLABUS

Also PLSC 253.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Steven Brill
M 9:00-10:50

ENGLISH 467A: JOURNALISM
Steven Brill ● sb@brillbusiness.com ● (212) 332-6301
Fall 2016

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar – the core course for Yale Journalism Scholars – is for those interested in understanding the changing role of journalism, in coming to grips with the challenges and opportunities related to the business model of journalism in a digital, global age, and in learning the practice of journalism. Grades will be based on participation and written work, with an emphasis on the final project.

An emphasis will be placed on both imaginative and critical thinking as it applies to reporting and to creating ways and forms of telling a story so that it has maximum impact in a world cluttered with media and experiencing profound challenges to making journalism economically viable.

One or perhaps two extra (and voluntary) sessions will take place in New York City, so that students can meet with working journalists there.

I will meet with each student individually during the term as often as necessary in order to provide feedback, help with the final project, and (if requested) provide career guidance.

Guest instructors during two of the sessions will be Bob Woodward and Gay Talese.

Successful completion of this course and other aspects of the Yale Journalism Scholars program will qualify students to be designated Yale Journalism Scholars. For more information on the Yale Journalism Scholars and the Yale Journalism Initiative, see http://www.yale.edu/writing/journalism.
 
INSTRUCTOR:  Steven Brill, a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School, worked as a writer for New York Magazine, Esquire, and Harpers while in Law School. In 1978 he was the author of a best-selling book on the Teamsters Union. A year later, he launched The American Lawyer Magazine and later expanded it into ten legal publications across the country. In 1991 Brill launched Court TV and, in 1998, Brill’s Content Magazine. In 2002, Brill wrote a series of columns in Newsweek about America’s response to September 11, as well as After: The Rebuilding and Defending of America in the September 12 Era, which was published in 2003 by Simon & Schuster. In 2009, he founded Journalism Online, LLC, to enable newspapers, magazines, and online publishers to earn revenue from the journalism they publish online. In the last four years he has also written feature articles for The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, and TIME. In 2011, he wrote Class Warfare: Inside the Fight To Fix America’s Schools. He is also a weekly columnist for Reuters. In 2013, he authored a special edition of TIME Magazine – “Bitter Pill: How Medical Bills Are Killing Us” – about healthcare prices and profits. His book about American healthcare and the fight over Obamacare was published in early 2015 by Random House. His serialized story published in The Huffington Post in 2015 of how a major drug company marketed an anti-psychotic drug illegally to children and the elderly – “America’s Most Admired Law Breaker” – is being developed as a television series.

MEETINGS:  Mondays, 9:00 – 10:50 a.m. in LC 103

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS:  The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. In general, we are looking for a range of students – some with demonstrated commitment to and experience in journalism, others without that background but who can write well, want to learn, and perhaps have an added dimension to offer in class discussions (such as an intense interest in politics, the arts, law, or economics), which they might want to apply to journalism.

Admission:

Each student must submit the following simple, two-part application package to sb@brillbusiness.com. I prefer that you submit the package by the evening of Monday, September 5, 2016.

If you want to submit your application earlier, you can submit it any time after August 15 – and in some cases I will admit students early who do so. If there are 15 well qualified applicants from among those applying early, I will send notice that the application process has closed as soon as it has.

However, if you first want to visit the introductory class on Friday, September 2 (which is the substitute for the regular Monday class because of Labor Day), that is fine.

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN by 11:59 PM on Monday, September 5.  I will post with the English Department the final list of those accepted by Wednesday, September 7, if not earlier.

The two-part application should consist of:

1.    No more than two double-spaced pages: A written statement explaining your interest in the class and in the Yale Journalism Scholars program. This should also include your Yale class year, any previous writing courses that you have taken, a brief description of your extra-curricular activities and a description of your journalism experience.

2.    One writing sample – either an article that you have published in an on- or off- campus publication or something that you submitted for a class.

READINGS:  The syllabus provides an outline of what we will cover in the course.  The course packet is available at TYCO, and all books are available at the Yale bookstore. Most of the reading will be from the “Other Reading” materials described below, supplemented by these books:

BOOKS:  John Hersey, Hiroshima
             James Stewart, Follow the Story: How to Write Successful Non-Fiction
             Gay Talese, The Gay Talese Reader
             Steven Brill, America’s Bitter Pill – to be handed out in class.

OTHER READING:

Various newspaper articles, magazine pieces and online postings intended to illustrate different forms and methods (and successes and failures of) journalism, ranging from Woodward and Bernstein’s original Watergate reporting, to celebrity profiles, to bulletins on Supreme Court decisions, to data-centric journalism at ProPublica. (All assembled in the course packet.)

ASSIGNMENTS:

•    Biographical profile – 2,000 words – of the person sitting next to you in this seminar.
•    Critiquing and editing of several published articles from time to time.
•    Coming to class with one original story idea every other week.
•    Filing three online reports and one final report in one day (that you pick) about a story unfolding on the Yale campus.
•    Writing a two-page strategic outline for an interview with a potentially hostile source.
•    Creating, with two partners, a viable path for one of the three students in the group for a career in journalism.
•    Final Assignment: 3,500-4,000 word publishable magazine (or e-magazine) feature story or three-part newspaper series – to be edited by one of your classmates before final submission to me.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: Because we will regularly discuss current journalism, all participants in the program should be prepared to bring a laptop or tablet to class.

OUTLINE OF READING AND ASSIGNMENTS
September 2, 2016: Introduction: In-class discussion of what the seminar will attempt to do and what is expected of participants.

Application for admission to class WILL THEN BE due September 5, 2016 by 11:59 pm, unless applications have already closed.

Admission decisions will be distributed by email by September 7, 2016 at the latest. Please complete the reading for September 12, 2016 before the class.
 _____________________________________________________________________________

Printable version

SYLLABUS

Also PLSC 253.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Anne Fadiman
Th 2:30-5:20

A seminar and workshop with the theme “At Home in America.” Students consider the varied ways in which modern American literary journalists write about place, and address the theme themselves in both reportorial and first-person work.

Please read the description below, paying special attention to sections highlighted in bold, some of which describe exceptions to the standard application procedure.

The purpose of this course is to examine and attempt good nonfiction writing through the microcosm of setting. How do we see America (whether urban or rural, east or west, rich or poor) as home? We will attempt to dismantle some of the traditional barriers between academic reading and pleasure reading as we discuss works by Joan Didion, Ian Frazier, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, John McPhee, Gay Talese, and others. Students will write four pieces (two first-person, two reportorial), the last of which is a substantial profile reported in New Haven, outside the Yale campus, on someone found in the Greater New Haven Yellow Pages. They will also critique each other’s work both orally and via email. Each student will have at least six individual conferences with me, most of them an hour long, to discuss and edit his or her work.

Students who wish to apply to English 469 should submit the standard Application for Writing Courses to the Drop Box of the English Student Resources site on Classes*v2 by noon on Wednesday, August 17. Please note the following special instructions for English 469 applications:

1. The standard application specifies “a” writing sample. Ignore that! I can assess your work better if you submit two samples, totaling 5-15 pages. (If the total length exceeds that, please mark the sections to which I should pay particular attention.) You may even submit three if one is very short (for instance, a Daily Themes one-pager).

2. If possible, your samples should belong to the same genre we’ll be reading and writing (“non-non”–nonacademic nonfiction). Essays, literary journalism, and personal essays would all be appropriate. (If fiction is your strength, one but not both of your samples may be a short story. Similarly, if you’re a playwright, one sample may be a scene from a play. The other sample should be non-non.) Be sure to choose pieces that give your literary style a thorough airing.

3. Your “statement of purpose” should be a note that explains some things your samples won’t tell me. The application suggests “a short paragraph,” but you are welcome to write as long a note as you wish. For instance: Why do you want to take the class? What would you contribute to it? What writing experience and honors have you accumulated? (I’ll still consider you if the answer is None and None.) What are you majoring in? (English majors will receive no special preference.) Is there anything else that might help me understand you as a writer or a person?

4. When you list the writing classes you’ve taken, please include the class’s name and instructor, not just its number.

Once English 469 is up on Classesv2, the site will have a bit more information at the bottom of the course description, including the names of former students who have offered to answer questions about the class.

Creative Writing
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2016

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

A workshop that explores the sentence as the basic unit of writing and the smallest unit of perception. The importance of the sentence itself versus that of form or genre. Writing as an act of discovery. Includes weekly writing assignments. Not open to freshmen.

Fall application due at noon on August 17; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2016

Special projects set up by the student in an area of particular interest with the help of a faculty adviser and the director of undergraduate studies, intended to enable the student to cover material not otherwise offered by the department. The course may be used for research or for directed reading, but in either case a term paper or its equivalent is normally required. The student meets regularly with the faculty adviser. To apply for admission, a student must submit an application and prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the office of the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016

Special projects set up by the student in an area of particular interest with the help of a faculty adviser and the director of undergraduate studies, intended to enable the student to cover material not otherwise offered by the department. The course may be used for research or for directed reading, but in either case a term paper or its equivalent is normally required. The student meets regularly with the faculty adviser. To apply for admission, a student must submit an application and prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the office of the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term projects and by April 21, 2017, for fall-term projects.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 11, 2016, for Spring 2017 projects and by April 13, 2017, for Fall 2017 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Second term of the optional yearlong senior essay. Students may begin the yearlong essay in the spring term of the junior year, allowing for significant summer research, with permission of the instructor. After ENGL 490.

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Second term of the optional yearlong senior essay. Students may begin the yearlong essay in the spring term of the junior year, allowing for significant summer research, with permission of the instructor. After ENGL 490.

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 7, 2016, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 21, 2017, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Roberta Frank
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

The essentials of the language, some prose readings, and close study of several celebrated Old English poems.

Also LING 500.

Graduate Seminars
Medieval Lit
Term: Fall
2016
W 9.25am-11.15am

Using modern postcolonial as well as medieval theories of translation, memory, and bilingualism we will explore how texts are transformed, cited and re-invented in the medieval period. What happens to language under the pressure of crosslingual reading practices?  How can the freedom and inventiveness of medieval poetic practices illuminate modern theories of translation?  Texts include material in French, English, Latin, and Italian. Proficiency in any one or more of these languages is welcome, but every effort will be made to use texts available in modern English translation, so as to include as wide a participation as possible in the course. 

Also CPLT 582/FREN 802

Graduate Seminars
Medieval Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: David Quint
T 10:20-12:20

2016 marks the 500th anniversary of the Orlando furioso and the 400th anniversary of the death of Cervantes. This course will read the Orlando furioso, Ariosto’s Cinque canti, and Don Quijote as depictions of the crisis of chivalry, and it will chart, in the case of Don Quijote, the birth of the modern novel. It will examine the use in these works of mirroring episodes – entrelacement – and of interpolated tales. It also looks at similar techniques in Apuleius’s The Golden Ass, in the Thousand and One Nights, and in Sir Philip Sidney’s New Arcadia.

Also CPLT 670.

Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
2016
Th 1.30pm-3.20pm

This course has two complementary, though sometimes divergent, objects of interest: the first is the poetry of Edmund Spenser, particularly his immense allegorical epic-romance, The Faerie Queene; the second is that poem’s varied and often vexed reception history, from the late sixteenth century through the present. The Faerie Queene is a poem about interpretation–its pleasures and its discontents–and we often find ourselves reading over the shoulders of readers in the poem. But it’s also possible to read the poem through the eyes of other historical readers, adopting their (often alien) expectations, ambitions, and preoccupations as a way of discovering new things in the text and of reflecting on the biases and assumptions of our own critical practices.  In this sense, this will be a course about readerly methods and the history of reading as well as a course about Spenser, and I warmly welcome participants whose primary interests lie outside the English Renaissance. 

Graduate Seminars
Early Modern
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: John Rogers
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

A survey of seventeenth-century poetry and prose, exclusive of Milton. Authors include Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Herbert, Browne, Crashaw, Marvell, Cavendish, Bunyan, and Dryden. 

Graduate Seminars
Early Modern
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Paul Fry
Th 10.30am-12.20pm

Poetry and prose of Byron, Shelley, and Keats with emphasis on both their differences and their common qualities. Special attention is given to the complex interactions of these poets with Wordsworth and Coleridge. 

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: David Bromwich
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

Intensive survey of British literature from the depression to the Cold War. We begin with the later writings of Lawrence and Yeats, and end with John Osborne and Thom Gunn, allowing for particular attention to the careers of Orwell and Auden. Among the other assigned authors: Woolf, MacDiarmid, Churchill, Gandhi, Isherwood, Bowen, Amis, Larkin, Hughes, Greene, and Green; along with films by Michael Powell, Carol Reed, and Tony Richardson.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st Century Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Daphne Brooks
T 1.30pm-3.20pm

An exploration of sonic theory and the African American literary tradition from the nineteenth century through the millennium with special emphasis on major debates in jazz studies and a critical (re)examination of blues ideologies, as well as the politics and poetics of spirituals, R&B and soul, funk, Afrofuturism, punk, pop, and hip-hop. The course places the work of a range of cultural theorists (Douglass, DuBois, Adorno, Hurston, Ellison, Murray, Baraka, Mackey, Carby, Spillers, O’Meally, Griffin, Moten, Edwards, Radano, Nancy, Szendy, Perry, Weheliye, etc.) in conversation with key texts and epochs in black letters.

Also AFAM 514a/AMST 735

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st Century Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: R. John Williams
W 3.30pm-5.20pm

This course examines transformations in temporality that occurred in the sciences and arts during the twentieth century.  From the arrival of Einsteinian relativity to more contemporary proofs on quantum non-locality, the question of time in the twentieth century threatened to overturn some of our oldest assumptions about cause and effect, duration, history, presentness, and futurity. These new temporalities were as scientifically and philosophically vexing as they were rife with spiritual and aesthetic possibility–a dynamic reflected in the literary and artistic forms that were central to these transformations.  Our reading will reflect this deeply crosscultural and interdisciplinary trajectory, including histories of science and technology (Peter Galison, N. Katherine Hayles, David Kaiser), philosophies of time (Heidegger, Bruno Latour, Bernard Stiegler, McLuhan, Luhmann), critical theories of temporal form (Derrida, Adorno, Jameson, Pamela Lee, Kojin Karatani), a wide array of literary texts (William Burroughs, Thomas Pynchon, Ursula K. Le Guin, Tom McCarthy, and others) as well as important cinematic innovations (Jodorowsky, Godard, Kubrick).  Central to our investigation will be questions such as, What is the “time” of literature? What is the “time” of film? How does art transform or reinforce theories of temporal flow? How do new technologies of composition and circulation alter the temporal effects of a given work? What was the “End of History”? Coursework will include discussion, an in-class presentation, and either an extensive annotated bibliography or final paper.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st Century Lit
Term: Fall
2016
Professor: Tavia Nyong'o
M 1.30pm-3.20pm

This graduate seminar will trace the emergence of affect, sense, feeling, and mood as critical keywords in American Studies. Particular attention will be paid to the manner in which queer theorists such as Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Lauren Berlant, Ann Cvetkovich, Heather Love, Jennifer Doyle, Jonathan Flatley, and José Esteban Muñoz developed the concept in what has been called “the affective turn” in queer and feminist aesthetics. The philosophical basis of affect theory in the writings of Spinoza, Heidegger, and Deleuze will form the core of the seminar. We will also look to an alternate genealogy for affect politics in the writings of Bergson and Deleuze on fabulation. We will consider the psychoanalytic take on affect, in particular, the object relations school of Klein and Winnicott, and we will read critics who contrast affect theory with trauma theory. Marxist contributions to affect theory will include readings from Virno (on humor), Hardt and Negri (on affective labor), and Ranciere (on the distribution of the sensible). The writings of Jasbir Puar and Brian Massumi on the affective politics of contemporary war, empire, and societies of control will also be considered, as will writings by Fred Moten, Saidiya Hartman, and Frank Wilderson on optimism and pessimism as moods/modalities of black studies. 

Also AFAM 775/AMST 771

Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
2016

Designed to help fill gaps in students programs when there are corresponding gaps in the department’s offerings. By arrangement with faculty and with the approval of the DGS.

Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
2016