Courses

Professor: Wai Chee Dimock
Course Type: Seminar
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

An introduction to American literature, told through the vibrant lives, ethnic diversities, and innovative genres revolving around three urban centers. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Course Type: Seminar
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

African American poetry from Paul Laurence Dunbar to the present, with special attention to the contemporary Black poetry renaissance. Works explored in the contexts of locale, history, and literary and cultural movements. Research conducted in the Beinecke Library's archives and in other archival collections at Yale. Includes attendance at poetry readings on campus, classroom visits by practicing poets in the contemporary canon, and a field trip to New York City. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Professor: Anya Adair
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

Fantasy worlds are not only the stuff of fiction: they are to be found in many arenas of modern life. This seminar asks what work these fantasies perform and what they might reveal about our realities.

Professor: Janice Carlisle
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00-2:15

Football Nation, America’s Game, King Football – such titles testify to the status of football as the predominant sport in the United States. Yet how exactly, we will ask, does football embody American values?

Professor: Elizabeth Gansen
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:00-10:15

We cannot avoid things: they surround us in our everyday lives, reflecting who we are and inspiring us to new realms of thought and creativity. To what extent do things define us, and we, them?

Professor: Edgar Garcia
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

Globalization is affecting all aspects of human life. In this seminar, we will explore how its effect on the environment is changing how people, as citizens of the world, relate to nature.

Professor: Karin Gosselink
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:00-10:15

What does it mean to be a global citizen? This seminar explores our participation in the lives of those far away, from debates over international interventions to the challenges of shaping the future of globalization.

Professor: Emily Hayman
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

Although adaptations and translations are fundamental to our world, they are often seen as less valuable than the sources from which they originate. This seminar will examine our assumptions about authenticity and originality.

Professor: Briallen Hopper
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

This seminar explores the dynamic role of religion in American politics and popular culture, with special attention to race and ethnicity, religious liberty, gender, sexuality, and social reform movements.

Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 9:00-10:15

“Just fake it!” Fakery can seem the easy way out, but a good faker is an artist, and a good fake is a masterpiece. And every fake needs its audience, able – even eager – to be deceived.

Professor: Rosemary Jones
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: WF 11:35-12:50

What shapes our definition of beauty? In this course we will explore whether society’s desire for certain kinds of beauty may obscure or distort the potential of beauty to represent or suggest a conception of truth.

Professor: Daniel Jump
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

It has long been thought that the capacity to act sets apart the human species. But what does it mean to act, both as individuals and in groups? What makes action possible?

Professor: Alice Kelly
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 9:00-10:15

War is a defining feature of human society, but modes of warfare and commemoration have changed over time. This seminar examines what it means to be at war and how we remember our war dead.

Professor: Heather Klemann
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

What is childhood? What does it mean to have or not have a childhood? When does it end? Keeping our own experiences in mind, in this seminar we investigate the concept through a variety of disciplines.

Professor: Heather Klemann
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

What is childhood? What does it mean to have or not have a childhood? When does it end? Keeping our own experiences in mind, in this seminar we investigate the concept through a variety of disciplines.

Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00-2:15

Do free markets go hand in hand with democracy? We will look for some answers to this big question by asking how the recent financial crisis has altered global capital markets and liberal democracies.

Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

Do free markets go hand in hand with democracy? We will look for some answers to this big question by asking how the recent financial crisis has altered global capital markets and liberal democracies.

Professor: Timothy Kreiner
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

Questions concerning the core dynamics of capitalism have returned with a vengeance in recent years. In this seminar we will ask how these questions inform arguments for or against capitalism today.

Professor: Timothy Kreiner
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

From the French Revolution to the present, inequality has driven debate concerning the political organization of social life. This seminar examines how historical texts address the subjects of inequality and its discontents.

Professor: Angus Ledingham
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

Examining both the central arguments that have been made in favor of freedom of expression and critical responses to them, this seminar explores such issues as blasphemy, pornography, and campus speech codes.

Professor: Andrew McKendry
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

This seminar examines the political and cultural role of social groups – the people, the masses, the crowd, and the community. How are representations of gatherings, whether a protest or a party, shaped by ideological contexts?

Professor: Timothy Robinson
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 4:00-5:15

This seminar focuses upon the ongoing debate about the function and effect of censorship and the arts throughout history. Assignments will include critical readings and written responses to this dialogue about free expression.

Professor: Rebecca Rush
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

By exploring the purpose of education in American society, this seminar asks if education should impart practical skills that can be applied in our careers and everyday lives. Or should knowledge be pursued for its own sake?

Professor: Anne Schindel
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 4:00-5:15

When is a life good? Is there ever a right time to die? And if possible, would we choose to live forever? This seminar explores such questions from the perspectives of bioethics, law, psychology, and philosophy.

Professor: Barbara Stuart
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

This seminar examines the omnibus legislation that largely controls what ends up on our plates in this country. We will then ask if our food system is broken and, if so, which fixes are politically and economically feasible.

Professor: Barbara Stuart
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

This seminar examines the omnibus legislation that largely controls what ends up on our plates in this country. We will then ask if our food system is broken and, if so, which fixes are politically and economically feasible.

Professor: Meg Weisberg
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

By first examining canonical Western visual artists and then a wide range of aesthetic movements, we will consider the meanings of art: the meanings conveyed by both the term and individual works.

Professor: Elizabeth Wiet
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00-2:15

How do we use performance to fashion our individual identities and to construct societies? This seminar will explore the myriad ways in which concepts of performance and play inform everyday (and not so everyday) life.

Professor: Pamela Newton
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

Our travel experiences shape the way we see the world and understand ourselves within it. What do we gain by positioning ourselves as travelers or tourists, and what do we lose?

Professor: Grant Wiedenfeld
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

In today’s mass media, no athlete is only an athlete, and no game is just a game. We will study the importance of sports in American culture, focusing on media, gender, ritualized play, and some historic black athletes.

Professor: Grant Wiedenfeld
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

From cinema to smartphones, electronic forms of media have led scholars to reconsider the contemporary possibilities of play, whose benefits have long been associated with child development and the arts.

Professor: Justin Neuman
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

What does it mean to be a hero? This course investigates the motif of the hero in world literature from ancient epic to postmodern metafiction, asking how the meanings of heroism and modes of heroic action change through time, across literary genres, and between religious and cultural traditions. We will trace how heroic literature both promotes and interrogates cultural values, exploring the way heroic ideals are interwoven with concepts of suffering, self-sacrifice, masculinity, physical strength, and moral courage. The course will interrogate the martial legacy of the heroic code, asking how concepts of heroism travel beyond the battlefield and intersect with markers of difference like race, class, and gender. Texts include the Epic of Gilgamesh, Sophocles’ Antigone, Shakespeare’s Henry V, Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman, Pynchon’s Crying of Lot 49, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, and selections from the Bible and Homer’s Iliad.

Professor: Matthew Hunter
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

From Lucifer to Heathcliff, from Richard III to Tony Soprano, our culture is filled of characters whom we know to be bad but cannot resist. What does it mean when the villain, who should repel us, instead becomes an object of our fascination, even our identification? In this course, we will study a range of literary works in order to answer this question. Poems, plays, novels, films, and even television shows will provide the material through which we think critically about the nature of villainy and its ethical, artistic, and social significance. But as the many lovable villains of this course will demonstrate, we cannot think critically about villainy without also coming to terms the nature of lovability—of charisma—itself.

Professor: Jill Richards
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 9:00-10:15

In The Tempest, Caliban is called a “mooncalf,” a “freckled monster,” a mixture of fish and man, “not honour’d with a human shape.” Beginning with Shakespeare’s eloquent monstrosity, this course will track the literary imagination of subjects that somehow fall outside legal, cultural, or biological classifications of “the human.” Moving across a variety of genres, we will follow the paths of anthropomorphic insects, ghoulish children, terrorists, slaves, clones, zombies, and political dissidents to ask: How do these literary constructions put pressure on the legal demarcation between human and inhuman? What practices, reading strategies, and assumptions does such categorization allow? Central to this inquiry will be the historical arc of what we now call “human rights” in legal theory and practice.

This class will focus on analyzing and writing about literary texts. A portion of the class will be spent working on the writing skills you need to convey such arguments clearly and effectively in a full-length paper. Texts include William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Art Spiegelman, The Complete Maus; Aimé Césaire, Notebook of a Return to the Native Land; Doris Lessing, The Fifth Child; Kazuo Ishiguru, Never Let Me Go; films include Battle of Algiers and District 9.

Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:00-10:15

“War hath determined us,” writes John Milton in his epic poem, Paradise Lost. No other aspect of human experience has captured more writers’ imaginations than war. But why write literature about war? Do we memorialize the dead to boost the morale of those who are about to die, or to warn others never to allow such death to happen so easily? Can literature about war be more than merely journalistic history-writing or political propaganda? In this course, we will study a range of literary works in order to answer these questions. Do different kinds of wars produce different kinds of literature? Has technology changed the experience of war, or does war never change? What makes for “good” war literature, telling the truth or telling a good story? Does war shape how we imagine ourselves and our society? Does war in fact determine us?

Professor: Ryan Wepler
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

Can reading good literature make you a good person? Does encountering art that challenges your certainties, broadens your experience, and probes the limits of existence make you more sensitive to your own personhood and the humanity of others? In this course we will examine what it means to be moved by literature. We will reflect on what kinds of works affect us most complexly and how (or whether) being affected in this way can reshape our character. Our collective goal will not just be to produce a theory of good literature, but to experience its goodness, to develop your capacity to be moved by a literary work and reflect on what happened to you during that process.

Four essays of increasing complexity and a series of shorter writing assignments will advance your ability to make surprising and meaningful claims about literary works and defend those positions using clear, persuasive prose. Texts range from popular successes to great masterpieces and include: Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s Notes from the Underground; short fiction and excerpts by Sir. Arthur Conan Doyle, Ernest Hemingway, Flannery O’Connor, O Henry, Jorge Luis Borges, Kurt Vonnegut, Karen Russell, George Saunders, and E. L. James; poetry by John Donne, William Wordsworth, Walt Whitman, and Hayden Carruth; and one of the Harry Potter films.

Professor: Fred Strebeigh
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Margaret Deli
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Merve Emre
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Tom Hopkins
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00-2:15

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Briallen Hopper
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Allyson McCabe
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Palmer Rampell
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Adam Sexton
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00-2:15

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Kim Shirkhani
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 9:00-10:15

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Kim Shirkhani
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Justin Sider
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00-2:15

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Barbara Stuart
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Shifra Sharlin
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Shifra Sharlin
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals' strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Professor: Andrew Ehrgood
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

Law has an intellectual structure of its own, and the lawyers and judges who make law and interpret it have peculiar ways of imagining and talking about the world, habits of thought and expression that can mystify the nonlawyer. In this course, you will begin to learn to read and speak and write the lawyer s language: you will learn to reason and argue in distinctively lawyerly ways about the sorts of problems that lawyers are paid to attend to. And as you acquire and become adept at this odd language, you will also evaluate it, assessing its appeal and usefulness to you as a thinker, writer, and citizen.

Prerequisite: ENGL 114 or 120 or permission of instructor. Not open to freshmen in the fall term.

ENGL 121 may be repeated for course credit in a section that teaches a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

Professor: Richard Deming
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Professor: Danielle Chapman
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Professor: Nalini Jones
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Professor: Leslie Brisman
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Professor: Ben Glaser
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00-2:15

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Professor: Alastair Minnis
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Professor: Brian Walsh
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, and Eliot or another modern anglophone poet. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Professor: R. John Williams
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O'Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O'Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. D az.

Professor: Ryan Carr
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O'Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O'Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. D az.

Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:00-10:15

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O'Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O'Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. D az.

Professor: Karin Roffman
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O'Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O'Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. D az.

Professor: R. John Williams
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00-2:15

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O'Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O'Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. D az.

Professor: Margaret Homans
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer's Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer's Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Professor: Joseph Roach
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer's Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Professor: Ruth Yeazell
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer's Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Professor: Adam Sexton
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 3:30-5:20

Fundamentals of the craft of fiction writing explored through readings from classic and contemporary short stories and novels. Focus on how each author has used the fundamentals of craft. Writing exercises emphasize elements such as voice, structure, point of view, character, and tone.

Professor: David Gorin
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 2:30-4:30

An introduction to reading and writing poetry. Classic examples from Shakespeare and Milton, the modernist poetics of Stein, Pound, Moore, and Stevens, and recent work in a variety of forms and traditions. Students develop a portfolio of poems and write an essay on the poetic craft of poets who have influenced their work.

Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

The sources, aims, and diversity of biographical forms in medieval literature. Analysis of the medieval world through the study of autobiography, hagiography, political martyrology, and literary biography; the challenges of viewing a historical period primarily through a single life. Includes a research trip to New York City. Recommended preparation: reading knowledge of French.

Professor: Alastair Minnis
Course Type: Lecture & 1 HTBA/Lectures
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:25-10:15, 1 HTBA

A study of medieval narrative traditions and their appropriation in modern film. Beowulf, selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and Malory's Morte D'Arthur are compared with modern film and television adaptations.

Professor: Kathryn James
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 1:30-3:20

The influence of the book in Britain from 1475 to 1660, including both manuscript and print formats. The book as material, cultural, and political object; its role in religious, political, and social transformations of the period. Focus on objects from Yale's British history and art collections.

Professor: Brian Walsh
Course Type: Lecture & 1 HTBA/Lectures
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:30-2:20, 1 HTBA

A study of Shakespeare's histories and tragedies, focusing on attentive reading of the play texts and consideration of the theatrical, literary, intellectual, political, and social worlds in which the plays were written, performed, and experienced.

Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

Poets who fall outside the mainstream of major English poetry, either by circumstance or by choice, and their role in the evolution of the English poetic tradition. Focus on poetry written between 1500 and 1800, when the idea and contours of a vernacular canon first took shape. The historically contingent character of qualities such as genius, beauty, and good taste.

Professor: John Rogers
Course Type: Lecture & 1 HTBA/Lectures
Term: Fall
Day/Time: WF 11:35-12:25, 1HTBA

A study of John Milton's poetry, his engagement with the cultural, social, and political struggles of the English Revolution, and his decisive influence on the course of English literature.

Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

This course focuses on three related concerns in eighteenth-century poetry and fiction: the representation and critique of political institutions; the relation between self and others; and the emergence of ecological consciousness. We will examine in each case how literary texts responded to and helped to create much of what we consider as modernity, including ideas of political sovereignty and personal identity, science and the changing natural landscape, and urban communities and ethics. Authors include Dryden, Behn, Pope, Defoe, Swift, Haywood, Thomson, Cowper, Sterne and others.

Professor: Edward Ball
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

Introduction to writing narrative nonfiction, including history, biography, and narrative journalism. The craft of turning real events, past or present, into plot- and character-driven stories. Reading of model texts, with attention to their use of character, making of scenes, point of view, structure, and dramatic moves. Students research, write, and revise their own nonfiction texts. Prerequisite: a 200-level English course or a History course.

Professor: Langdon Hammer
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 2:30-3:45

The formative influences of Sappho and C. P. Cavafy on the Anglo-American literary tradition from the twentieth century to the present. Nationalism and imperialism, sexuality and aesthetics, biography and art, sapphic verse, the reception of the classical tradition, and the topography of modernity. Writers' fascination with the eastern Mediterranean as an alternative locus for modern Greek, English, and American identities.

Professor: Tom Hopkins
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 2:30-4:20

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review. Prerequisite: a previous course in English or in another literature.

Professor: Leslie Jamison
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 2:30-4:20

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review. Prerequisite: a previous course in English or in another literature.

Professor: Louise Glück
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

A seminar workshop for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Yale. Preference given to freshmen and sophomores.

Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

A workshop on journalistic strategies for looking at and writing about contemporary paintings of the human figure. Practitioners and theorists of figurative painting; controversies, partisans, and opponents. Includes field trips to museums and galleries in New York City.

Professor: Paul Fry
Course Type: Lecture & 1 HTBA/Lectures
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:25, 1 HTBA

Major works of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P. B. Shelley, and Keats, as well as selections from the works of Blake and from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35-12:50

British historical narratives in the nineteenth century, an age often cited as the crucible of modern historical consciousness. How a period of industrialization and democratization grounded itself in imagined pasts whether recent or distant, domestic or foreign in both historical novels and works by historians who presented programmatic statements about the nature of historical development.

Professor: Greta LaFleur
Course Type: Lecture & 1 HTBA/Lectures
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:25-10:15, 1 HTBA

Introduction to major genres, movements, historical periods, and themes in American literature from the seventeenth century to 1865. Early American cultural, sociopolitical, religious, colonial, and literary history; literary forms such as novels, poetry, essays, sermons, autobiography, and short stories. Authors include Douglass, Melville, Dickinson, Apess, Poe, Whitman, Paine, and Brockden Brown.

Professor: Jill Richards
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00-2:15

A survey of major British novels, and of British modernism more generally, from 1900 to 1945. Ways in which the novels envision contemporaneous revolutionary currents and uprisings in Russia, Mexico, India, and Ireland. Emphasis on perspectives endemic to modernist studies, including colonialism, feminism, primitivism, nihilism, anarchism, socialism, and impressionism.

Professor: Ruth Yeazell
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

Close study of selected novels by Jane Austen, George Eliot, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf, with particular attention to the representation of consciousness and the development of free indirect discourse, as well as recent speculations about so-called theory of mind. Readings supplemented by narrative theory. Pre-1900 with permission of instructor.

Professor: James Berger
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 1:30-3:20
Professor: Anthony Reed
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

Reading of canonical and recent African American literature to trace connections between music and writing. Uses of music, sound, and sound engineering in black literary culture from jazz and blues poetry to hip-hop. No knowledge of music required.

Professor: Anthony Reed
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 2:30-4:20

Survey of major twentieth-century Caribbean poets such as Derek Walcott, Kamau Brathwaite, and Aim C saire.

Professor: J.D. McClatchy
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

A selective survey of the genre from its seventeenth-century Italian origins to the present day. The libretto's history, from opera seria to op ra comique to melodrama, featuring libretti by Hofmannsthal, W. S. Gilbert, and Auden. Emphasis on literary adaptations, from Da Ponte and Beaumarchais to Britten and Thomas Mann. Source material includes works by Shakespeare, Schiller, Hugo, Melville, and Tennessee Williams. Readings in English; musical background not required.

Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall

The spread of the English language around the world and the pluralization of English into many varieties. Key topics, major concepts, theoretical issues, and current debates in the field of world Englishes. Historical and sociopolitical factors that account for the global spread of English; linguistic implications of that spread; models and frameworks for describing different varieties of English; linguistic and structural features of selected varieties.

Professor: Justin Neuman
Course Type: Lecture & 1 HTBA/Lectures
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:25, 1 HTBA

Narrative literature from the late nineteenth century to the present that explores and reflects the dialectics of globalization. Vectors of globalization examined include energy systems, commodity capitalism, war, and sexuality. Works by Verne, Kafka, Forster, Duras, Bola o, and others.

Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 1:30-3:20

Issues of faith examined through poetry, with a focus on modern Christian poems from 1850 to the present. Some attention to poems from other faith traditions, as well as to secular and antireligious poetry.

Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

Major texts of Celtic literature, focusing on works from the birth of vernacular literature in the Middle Ages to the early modern period. Cultural, historical, and literary issues surrounding works in the Irish and Welsh languages; literary culture in Breton, Cornish, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx. Genres include lyric and bardic poetry, heroic and religious narrative, and early Arthurian works. Readings in English translation; no knowledge of Celtic languages assumed.

Professor: James Berger
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 1:30-3:20

Portrayals of cognitive and linguistic impairment in modern fiction. Characters with limited capacities for language as figures of "otherness." Contemporaneous discourses of science, sociology, ethics, politics, and aesthetics. The ethics of speaking about or for subjects at the margins of discourse.

Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 3:30-5:20

Historical survey of feminist and queer theory from the Enlightenment to the present, with readings from key British, French, and American works. Focus on the foundations and development of contemporary theory. Shared intellectual origins and concepts, as well as divergences and conflicts, among different ways of approaching gender and sexuality.

Professor: Caleb Smith
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

Law and literature as genres of discourse and institutions of authority, with a focus on the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Sources of legitimacy, conditions of legal crisis, and justifications for punishment. Readings from legal treatises, judicial opinions, and literary works by Aeschylus, Shakespeare, Jacobs, Melville, Baca, and others.

Professor: Joseph Roach
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

The intersection of the fine and performing arts in London and in the British provinces and colonies, from the stage designs of Inigo Jones in the seventeenth century to those of David Hockney in the twentieth and twenty-first. Survey of major styles in stage design, theatrical portraiture, theater architecture, and ephemera. Extensive use of collections in the Yale Center for British Art.

Professor: Leslie Brisman
Course Type: Seminar/Junior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30-3:45

Study of the Bible as a literature—a collection of works exhibiting a variety of attitudes toward the conflicting claims of tradition and originality, historicity and literariness. Pre-1800 with completion of supplementary assignments in the language of the King James Bible. If there is sufficient interest, a second section will be offered.

Professor: Ben Glaser
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

Theories about lyric poetry from Plato to the present. Focus on critical movements of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including new criticism, structuralism, the Frankfurt school, poststructuralism, cultural studies, and historical poetics. Lyric as an idea that intersects dynamically with a range of historical and cultural poetic practices.

Professor: Ian Cornelius
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30-3:45

A study of late medieval English poetry in alliterative verse: Arthurian romance, biblical narrative, saints' lives, and allegorical dream-visions. Readings include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Patience, Pearl, St. Erkenwald, and portions of Piers Plowman.

Professor: John Rogers
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 1:30-3:20

An examination of utopian fiction. Focus on works from early modern England, with some attention to more recent utopian writings. The genre's Platonic origins, its ties to early modern political philosophy, its role in the rise of the novel, and its legacy in science fiction. Utopian literature's abiding concern with issues of social discipline, religion, education, science, marriage, and sex.

Professor: David Kastan
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 9:25-11:15

Close study of Paradise Lost, focusing on the literary, political, and theological pressures that affected Milton's writing and that continue to affect his reputation.

Professor: Caryl Phillips
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 3:30-5:20

A study of literature that responds to a changing post World War II Britain, with attention to the problem of who "belongs" and who is an "outsider." Authors include Alan Hollinghurst, Kazuo Ishiguro, Colin McInnes, Samuel Selvon, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, and John Osborne.

Professor: Marc Robinson
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

Examination of modernist principles as they are adapted to, and tested in, American theater. Playwrights include Eugene O'Neill, Gertrude Stein, e. e. cummings, Djuna Barnes, Mae West, Thornton Wilder, Tennessee Williams, Jane Bowles, and Frank O'Hara.

Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 2:30-4:30

The influence of mapping and changing notions of space on literary form, from the cartographic revolution of the sixteenth century to the modern spatial-digital revolution of GPS mapping. Spatial literacy in verbal and visual texts; maps in books and as books; literary uses of mapping practices; recent literary theory on the spatial turn. Works by More, Cam es, Montaigne, Voltaire, Spenser, Milton, Pynchon, Walcott, and Chamoiseau. Use of the map collections in Yale's Sterling Memorial and Beinecke libraries.

Professor: Robert Stepto
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 1:30-3:20

The African American practice of poetry between 1900 and 1960, especially of sonnets, ballads, sermonic, and blues poems. Poets include Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Sterling Brown, Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, and Robert Hayden. Class sessions at the Beinecke Library for inspection and discussion of original editions, manuscripts, letters, and other archival material.

Professor: James Berger
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

Attempts of contemporary American authors to put the complexities of history into written form. Narrative as the privileged mode of historical representation; differences between what is regarded as academic history, popular history, and historical fiction; the influence of power and of the writer's own historical position on historical narrative; effects of ethnicity, gender, and race on the creation and reception of history; writers' use of historical fiction to change the ways readers think about the present and the future.

Professor: Margaret Homans
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: WF 11:35-12:50

A study of the major novels and other writings by Virginia Woolf, with additional readings in historical contexts and in Woolf biography and criticism. Focus on Woolf's modernist formal experimentation and on her responses and contributions to political movements of her day, principally feminism and pacifism; attention also to the critical reception of her work, with emphasis on feminist and queer literary criticism and theory.

Professor: Donald Margulies
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 2:30-5:00

A seminar and workshop in writing for the stage. Readings include modern American and British plays by Pinter, Mamet, Churchill, Kushner, Williams, and Wilder. Emphasis on play structure, character, and conflict. In addition to weekly exercises, students write a one-act play.

Professor: Fred Strebeigh
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 1:30-4:00

A nonfiction workshop, confronting the challenges of journalism as an art. Emphasis on voice and structure. Study of texts that may suggest modes, voices, forms, and styles for nonfiction pieces. Frequent writing projects and revisions.

Professor: Carl Zimmer
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 9:25-11:15

An intensive workshop in writing about science and the environment for a broad audience. Translating complex subjects into elegant prose, conducting interviews, handling controversies, researching articles, and finding one's voice. Readings include exemplary works ranging from newspaper articles to book excerpts.

Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 3:30-5:20

A seminar and workshop in the writing of verse. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 1:30-3:20

A seminar and workshop in the writing of verse. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Professor: Caryl Phillips
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 2:30-4:20

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Professor: Nalini Jones
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 2:30-4:20

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Professor: Steven Brill
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 9:00-10:50

An intensive workshop in the journalism profession and its changing role and accelerating challenges. Definitions of journalism; the role of journalism in a democracy and a free market; differences between information, news, vicarious news, and entertainment; knowing and telling a good story; the structure of newspaper articles, blogs, online newspapers and magazines, mixed digital media, magazine features, television reports, and nonfiction books; interviewing techniques; fairness; sourcing; the economics of journalism; and audience. Fulfills the core seminar requirement for Yale Journalism Scholars. No prerequisites.

Professor: Anne Fadiman
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 2:30-5:20

A seminar and workshop with the theme "At Home in America." Students consider the varied ways in which modern American literary journalists write about place, and address the theme themselves in both reportorial and first-person work. No prerequisites.

Course Type: Independent/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: HTBA

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies. Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Course Type: Independent/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: HTBA

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies. Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

A workshop that explores the sentence as the basic unit of writing and the smallest unit of perception. The importance of the sentence itself versus that of form or genre. Writing as an act of discovery. Includes weekly writing assignments. Not open to freshmen.

Professor: Richard Deming
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

A study of contemporary poetry and poetics that explores both literary criticism and creative writing. Ways to assess prevailing poetic values and articulate one's own. Attention to critical skills for engaging recent developments in the field; development of a sense of the current aesthetic landscape. Includes four additional class meetings with influential contemporary poets who represent a variety of styles and modes.

Course Type: Seminar
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30-3:20

Representations of artificial intelligence in science fiction, philosophy, and popular culture. Analysis of texts and theory complemented with creative writing.

Professor: Cynthia Zarin
Course Type: Seminar/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 1:30-3:20

An exploration of reading and writing about place. Definitions of home; different meanings and intent of travel. Readings include exemplary contemporary essays from the eighteenth century to the present. Workshop for assigned student essays. _

Professor: Jill Campbell
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00-2:15

Study of Jane Austen's fiction in relation to novels by her eighteenth-century predecessors, with additional short readings in poetry, philosophy, and political debate of the period. The range of novelistic forms and genres that emerged in the eighteenth century; new ways of depicting interior experience through fictional modes; the codification of gender and sexuality in the courtship plot.

Course Type: Independent
Term: Fall
Day/Time: HTBA

Special projects set up by the student in an area of particular interest with the help of a faculty adviser and the director of undergraduate studies, intended to enable the student to cover material not otherwise offered by the department. The course may be used for research or for directed reading, but in either case a term paper or its equivalent is normally required. The student meets regularly with the faculty adviser. To apply for admission, a student must submit an application and prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Students must apply by December 5, 2014, for spring-term projects and by April 24, 2015, for fall-term projects. Application details and forms are available at english.yale.edu/undergraduate-program.

Course Type: Independent/Creative Writing
Term: Fall
Day/Time: HTBA

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student's adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by December 5, 2014, for spring-term projects and by April 24, 2015, for fall-term projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term). Application details and forms are available at english.yale.edu/undergraduate-program.

Course Type: Independent/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: HTBA

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 5, 2014, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 24, 2015, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term. Application details and forms are available at english.yale.edu/undergraduate-program. For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Course Type: Independent/Senior Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: HTBA

Second term of the optional yearlong senior essay. Students may begin the yearlong essay in the spring term of the junior year, allowing for significant summer research, with permission of the instructor. After ENGL 490.

Professor: Traugott Lawler
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35-12:50

The essentials of the language, some prose readings, and close study of several celebrated Old English poems.

Professor: Jessica Brantley
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 9:25-11:15

This seminar explores the dramatic traditions of late-medieval England from many angles in order to construct a rich, contextual reading of theatrical culture in the period. The biblical cycle drama sometimes known as Corpus Christi or mystery plays forms the center of the course, and we consider evidence from all four extant cycles, while concentrating primarily on the N-Town plays. We read the cycle drama in the context of other important genres including liturgical drama, morality plays, saints plays, mummings and disguisings, and royal entries. Recent critical interest in the histories of performance leads us consider the difference enactment makes to the literary objects we study. But we also think about what it means to read a medieval play, particularly how the visual imagination works for a solitary reader. To this end, we investigate medieval artistic forms that touch the drama without (perhaps) being properly theatrical: liturgy, pageantry, song, spectacle, recitation, book illumination, sculpture, and stained glass. We also attend to the physical forms in which medieval drama is preserved i.e., the manuscripts in which we find the texts and performance records.

Professor: Ian Cornelius
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 9:25-11:15

A study of Piers Plowman, the restless and wide-ranging poem probably authored by William Langland in three versions between the 1360s and about 1390. We make a sequential reading of what is called the C text. Simultaneously, we study the literary cultures in which the poem was composed and circulated.

Professor: David Kastan
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 3:30-5:20

What is the history of the book a history of? What in fact is a book? What does a focus on the materiality of the book offer a literary critic, or for that matter a historian? These are some of the questions this course seeks to answer as it focuses on the book (understood capaciously) in the hand press period as a text, an object, a commodity, an event, even a fetish. This course is interested both in high theory and low technology. We explore various aspects of the production, circulation, and reception of books in early modern England (and in the process think also about the implications of our names and schemes of periodization). The course works with materials in the Beinecke Library to develop a knowledge of how books were made and used. We also explore the process of editing texts, considering how early modern books get reshaped as modern texts and what is lost and gained in the process.

Professor: Jill Campbell
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 9:25-11:15

Studies in the emergence of the novel as a category of literature and of fiction as a basis for experience in the course of the long eighteenth century. Likely authors include Behn, Haywood, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Austen, Maria Edgeworth, and Mary Shelley. Special emphasis on the forms of selfhood developed by the novel; the claims to attention of suppositional persons in fictional forms; the articulation of codes of gender and sexuality through generic conventions; and eighteenth- and early-nineteenthcentury experimentation with the uses of fiction for didactic and political ends. Readings also include a sampling of prose fiction for children and of nonfictional, polemical prose.

Professor: Paul Fry
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 1:30-3:20

Poetry and prose of Byron, Shelley, and Keats with emphasis on both their differences and their common qualities. Special attention is given to the complex interactions of these poets with Wordsworth and Coleridge.

Professor: Wai Chee Dimock
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 1:30-3:20

How does the choice of scale affect our understanding of American literature: its histories, its webs of relations, the varieties of genres that make up its landscape? Through three interlocking prisms regional, hemispheric, and oceanic we explore multiple permutations of immediate and extended environments; the size of events; causal connections and input networks; and the changing patterns of labor, food distribution, linguistic practice, religion, and war. Fiction and poetry by Olaudah Equiano, Herman Melville, Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, Elizabeth Bishop, Paul Bowles, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Dave Eggers, Monique Truong, Junot D az, Amitav Ghosh; and theoretical writings by Sheldon Pollock, Arjun Appadurai, Franco Moretti, Pascale Casanova, and Walter Mignolo.

Professor: Caleb Smith
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 9:25-11:15

Explores how the discipline of literary studies has engaged with the theoretical tradition known as the critique of power. Problems of subjectivity and subjection, racial and gendered identities, and the relations between power and knowledge. Readings include major theoretical works as well as a few primary sources and works of literary and cultural criticism. Theorists may include Nietzsche, Foucault, Butler, Deleuze, and others. Literary texts may include works by Sade, Bentham, Harriet Jacobs, and others.

Professor: Paul Grimstad
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 3:30-5:20

In the course we read and discuss works of fiction, criticism, film, and philosophy in order to address the relations between meaning and affect, significance and feeling. What is the relation of meaning to experience in an artwork? Is experience synonymous with affect? How does genre western, detective story, science fiction, melodrama, thriller inflect the relation of meaning to affect? How do such questions intersect with or illuminate the recent affective turn in the humanities? Authors may include Hammett, Chandler, Nabokov, Highsmith, Fried, Sontag, Barthelme, Kael, Schatz, Michaels, Deleuze, Ngai, Leys. Screenings may include films by Huston, Welles, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Lynch.

Professor: Alfred Guy
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 1:30-3:20

An introduction to the teaching of literature and writing with attention to the history of the profession and current issues in higher education. Weekly seminars address a series of issues about teaching: guiding classroom discussion; introducing students to various literary genres; formulating aims and assignments; grading and commenting on written work; lecturing and serving as a teaching assistant; preparing syllabuses and lesson plans.

Professor: Janice Carlisle
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
Day/Time: n/a

Training for graduate students teaching introductory expository writing. Students plan a course of their own design on a topic of their own choosing, and they then put theories of writing instruction into practice by teaching a writing seminar. Prerequisite: open only to graduate students teaching ENGL 114.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: HTBA

Designed to help fill gaps in students programs when there are corresponding gaps in the department s offerings. By arrangement with faculty and with the approval of the DGS.