Courses

Professor: Deborah Margolin
MW 3:30pm-5:20pm

A seminar and workshop in playwriting. Emphasis on developing an individual voice. Scenes read and critiqued in class.

Admission by application, with priority to Theater Studies majors. A writing sample and statement of purpose should be submitted to the instructor before the first class meeting.

May count toward the English major course requirement.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Stephanie Newell
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

An introduction to creative writing published in South Africa between the end of Apartheid in 1994 and the present. Close readings of contemporary fiction with additional material drawn from popular culture, including films, magazines, and music.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Also AFST 015.

Freshmen Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Brian Walsh
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

This seminar examines the kinds of knowledge and skills that students can gain from studying the humanities, and it also addresses the further question of the value that the humanities provide for society at large.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Heather Klemann
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

What is childhood? What does it mean to have or not have a childhood? And when does it end? Keeping our own experiences of childhood in mind, in this seminar we investigate the concept through a variety of disciplines.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Heather Klemann
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

What is childhood for so-called born digital generations? This course explores how developments in technology and communication reconfigure cultural constructions of and dearly held beliefs about youth.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Karin Gosselink
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

This course puts critical reading and academic writing in a global context through an exploration of global citizenship, foreign aid and development, human rights, and the political, economic, and cultural future of globalization.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

This seminar examines the Farm Bill, what Michael Pollan calls the “Food Bill,” the omnibus legislation that largely controls our food system in the United States.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

This seminar examines the Farm Bill, what Michael Pollan calls the “Food Bill,” the omnibus legislation that largely controls our food system in the United States.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Andrew McKendry
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

This course examines the political and cultural role of social groups – the people, the masses, the crowd, and the community. How are representations of gatherings, whether a protest or a party, shaped by ideological contexts?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

The ideal of equality haunts debates concerning the political organization of social life.  This writing course examines key texts that shaped this ideal in order to pose the question of how – or whether – equality opposes inequality today.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

Questions concerning the core dynamics of capitalism have returned with a vengeance in recent years. In this seminar we will ask how these questions inform arguments for or against capitalism today.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Pamela Newton
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Travel shapes the way we see the world and understand our place within it. This course explores what we gain and what we lose by becoming travelers and/or tourists.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Pamela Newton
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Modern cities challenge us to build communities on a large scale. In this seminar we explore what we want from our cities and what they tell us about ourselves.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Elizabeth Gansen
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

Things surround us, functioning as the stuff of our everyday lives. In this course, we examine the nature of this relationship and its implications. To what extent do things define us, and we, them?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Joshua Alvizu
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Few issues are more pressing than climate change.  But how can we meaningfully talk about or picture – in words, images, or graphics – geological processes that far exceed the scale of typical human understanding?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Ksenia Sidorenko
WF 9:00am-10:15am

This seminar looks at how sexuality is defined and regulated, how it is depicted in works of art and in the media, and how it has been harnessed for the purposes of marketing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Heather McKendry
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

This course explores how our understanding and experience of death, mourning, and mortality have been reshaped by the introduction of new media technologies, such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Reddit. @Deathin140 #DyingtoTakethisClass

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Bofang Li
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Are you Team Edward? Is Spock your man Vulcan? From bronies to Whovians, shipping Potterheads to stanning Beliebers, this course looks at the formation, expression, and practices of a variety of fan cultures.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Joseph Stadolnik
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

What does soccer mean to those who play it and watch it around the world? This course delves into the history and politics of soccer from Victorian Britain to its global present.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Melina Moe
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Scientists argue that we now live in “the Anthropocene,” an era defined by human activity.  This seminar focuses on the major interpretive shifts in a variety of academic disciplines that have been caused by this recognition.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Sarah Piazza
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

What constitutes love?  How do romance and desire shape modern understandings of love?  This course explores how new forms of mediation reconfigure contemporary romantic relationships. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Natalie Prizel
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

How are our bodies, seemingly natural, culturally and politically construed? This course examines how bodily differences, particularly regarding sexuality and disability, arouse social anxieties and raise ethical questions.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

This course explores complex debates about parents: who they are, how they should behave, and what role they play in determining who we become.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Katja Lindskog
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

What is beauty? And how does it matter to us today, in our daily lives? This course approaches beauty from a variety of angles, such as its relationship to gender, evolution, art, and economics.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

What counts as real science? On whose authority?  How can non-scientists evaluate political claims expressed in scientific rhetoric?  Examining topics like objectivity, culture and ethics, this seminar investigates the role of science in democratic societies.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Matthew Hunter
MW 4:00pm-5:15pm

To be real, sincere, authentic—these values are not just exalted by American culture, they are equated with it. This writing seminar takes a hard look at this connection between “realness” and the American imagination.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Heather McKendry
WF 11:35pm-12:50pm

This course explores how our understanding and experience of death, mourning, and mortality have been reshaped by the introduction of new media technologies, such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Reddit. @Deathin140 #DyingtoTakethisClass

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

What is the relationship between a city’s function in the world economy and its physical form? How are our understanding of citizenship and social justice affected by the rise of global cities?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Seo Hee Im
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Could eating be considered a socially symbolic act? By treating patterns of food consumption as seismographs of personal, social, and historical experience, we investigate how we are, both literally and figuratively, what we eat. 

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Sarah Robbins
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

In this course, we engage a variety of texts with the aim of developing understandings of the possibilities and pitfalls of American utopian thinking, past and present. Topics range from communal living to Black Lives Matter.   

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Andrew Willson
TTh 4:00pm-5:15pm

An investigation into the influence of consumerism and economics on American culture and society. Topics include advertising, technology, art, and societal change. Readings range from academic theory and cultural criticism to The Great Gatsby.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Grey Anderson
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

This course charts developments in twenty-first-century U.S. military power, with attention to new technologies and changing concepts of war, as well as related political, ethical, and strategic dilemmas.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Jill Richards
MW 9:00am-10:15am

In The Tempest, Caliban is called a “mooncalf,” a “freckled monster,” a mixture of fish and man, “not honour’d with a human shape.” Beginning with Shakespeare’s eloquent monstrosity, this course tracks the literary imagination of subjects that somehow fall outside legal, cultural, or biological classifications of “the human.” Moving across a variety of genres, we will follow the paths of anthropomorphic insects, ghoulish children, terrorists, slaves, clones, zombies, and political dissidents to ask: How do these literary constructions challenge the legal demarcation between human and inhuman? Central to this inquiry will be the historical arc of what we now call “human rights” in legal theory and practice.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Prashant Sharma
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

Who is the devil? What does it feel like to be seduced, or possessed, by him? From the biblical Snake, a subtle and treacherous beast, to the modern figure of the admirable rebel who dared to defy God himself, Western literature has been haunted by the figure of the devil. Many poets have celebrated him as the source of their creative power. Others have sold him their souls, with terrifying and tragic consequences. This course explores what our enduring fascination with the devil can tell us about the human will to transcend the limitations of nature and considers where he continues to lurk in our modern, apparently secular age. Readings include King Lear, selections from Paradise Lost, the Romantic poets, and Baudelaire’s Flowers of Evil, essays by Walter Benjamin and Leszek Kolakowski, and films The Exorcist and Brighton Rock.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Paul Franz
MW 4:00pm-5:15pm

Why do we have to work? Who has to work and who gets to? When do we work, and for whom? Is it possible to live without working? For millennia, poets, writers, and sacred texts have connected labor to loss, and even death: Adam and Eve were forced to work after being expelled from Eden and becoming mortal; ancient Greek and Roman poets imagined they lived in an “iron age” of suffering, and looked back nostalgically to a “golden age” of permanent leisure. But writers have also imagined work as a triumph over loss and death—either because art has the power to confer immortality, or because radical social change will make leisure more widespread. In this course we will consider how labor and leisure shape our understanding of nature and art, love and loss, pleasure and struggle, work and play. As we study how various writers have conceived of their art and craft, we will gain practice in thinking more deeply and attentively about our own.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Ryan Wepler
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Can reading good literature make you a good person? Does encountering art that challenges your certainties, broadens your experience, and probes the limits of existence make you more sensitive to your own personhood and the humanity of others? In this course we will consider what makes literature good and how good literature moves us. Our collective goal will not just be to produce a theory of good literature, but to experience its goodness, to develop your capacity to be moved by a literary work and reflect on what happened to you during that process. Readings range from popular successes to great masterpieces and include: Moby Dick (Melville), Mrs. Dalloway (Woolf), Henry IV, part 1 (Shakespeare); short fiction and excerpts by Sir. Arthur Conan Doyle, Mark Twain, Flannery O’Connor, O Henry, Jorge Luis Borges, Kurt Vonnegut, Karen Russell, George Saunders, and E. L. James; selected poetry; and one of the Harry Potter films.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Fred Strebeigh
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Andrew Ehrgood
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Gina Hurley
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Matthew Hunter
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Mark Oppenheimer
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Adam Sexton
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Shifra Sharlin
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Shifra Sharlin
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Kim Shirkhani
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Kim Shirkhani
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Barbara Stuart
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Ayten Tartici
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Andrew Ehrgood
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professionals’ strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Richard Deming
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Richard Deming
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Danielle Chapman
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Danielle Chapman
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Susan Choi
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Susan Choi
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes, Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Lawrence Manley
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Ian Cornelius
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Alastair Minnis
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Joseph North
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Joseph North
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

An introduction to the diversity and the continuity of the English literary tradition through close reading of four poets from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Sunny Xiang
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Sunny Xiang
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Kimberly Andrews
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Ryan Carr
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Major works of the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on analytical reading and critical writing. Authors may include Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Bryant, Whitman, Dickinson, Thoreau, Emerson, Douglass, Stowe, Twain, Wharton, Cather, H. Crane, Stevens, Stein, L. Hughes, Paredes, Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, M. Robinson, C. McCarthy, Morrison, E. P. Jones, J. Díaz.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 168.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Katja Lindskog
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 168.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Timothy Robinson
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 168.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, Monday, August 31, 9:00am-7:30pm.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Adam Sexton
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

Fundamentals of the craft of fiction writing explored through readings from classic and contemporary short stories and novels. Focus on how each author has used the fundamentals of craft. Writing exercises emphasize elements such as voice, structure, point of view, character, and tone.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome. The standard creative writing course application is not required for admission to ENGL 134. Interested students should attend the first class for placement information.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
T 2:30-4:30

An introduction to reading and writing poetry. Classic examples from Shakespeare and Milton, the modernist poetics of Stein, Pound, Moore, and Stevens, and recent work in a variety of forms and traditions. Students develop a portfolio of poems and write an essay on the poetic craft of poets who have influenced their work.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome. The standard creative writing course application is not required for admission to ENGL 135. Interested students should attend the first class for placement information.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Roberta Frank
TTh 2:30-3:45

An introduction to the literature and culture of earliest England. A selection of prose and verse, including riddles, heroic poetry, meditations on loss, a dream vision, and excerpts from Beowulf, read in the original old English.

Also LING 150.

Junior Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
HU
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Ian Cornelius
MW 4:00pm-5:15pm

The English language and its literature in the late medieval period. Survey of the period’s literary language and genres; languages and forms of romance, dream vision, lyric, cycle drama, dialogue, and devotional prose; travel narratives that reflect on the truth of religious experience; problems of authorship and authority; first-person narration; encounters with religious and cultural alterity. Authors include Chaucer, Trevisa, Langland, Kempe, and Mandeville.

Junior Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Brian Walsh
MW 2:30pm-3:20pm, 1 HTBA

A study of Shakespeare’s histories and tragedies, focusing on attentive reading of the play texts and consideration of the theatrical, literary, intellectual, political, and social worlds in which the plays were written, performed, and experienced.

Lectures
Pre-1800 Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

This class examines the role of poetry in the creation of modern ideas of self and the social order during the long eighteenth century (1660-1820). We’ll look closely at poems that feature changing ideas of gender and sexuality, urban communities and ethics, science and the natural landscape (including the beginnings of ecological consciousness), political sovereignty, empire, and race, animal life, and personal identity. We’ll ask what’s modern about modernity? How did poetry both respond to and help to create what it meant to be a modern subject, in relation to other subjects, to animals, and to the natural world.

We’ll also read some contemporary theory—by Foucault, Taylor, Williams, and others—on the condition of modernity, ideas of sexuality and race, the relations of humans to other animals and to the environment.

 

Junior Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: John Crowley
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review. Prerequisite: a previous course in English or in another literature.

Fall application due at noon on August 19; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Susan Choi
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review. Prerequisite: a previous course in English or in another literature.

Fall application due at noon on August 19; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Cynthia Zarin
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar workshop for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Yale. Preference given to freshmen and sophomores.

Fall application due at noon on August 19; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2015
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

A workshop on journalistic strategies for looking at and writing about contemporary paintings of the human figure. Practitioners and theorists of figurative painting; controversies, partisans, and opponents. Includes field trips to museums and galleries in New York City.

No advance application is required for this course.

Also HSAR 460

Creative Writing
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to the work of Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats, with  some attention to Byron, to the poets’ own problematic revisions, and to and the minor poets of this rich period of poetic innovation and revolutionary spirit.

Junior Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Janice Carlisle
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

Crimes of passion, greed, and desperation as they are represented in Victorian literature from Dickens to Conan Doyle and in the graphic arts from Cruikshank to Frith. Readings include fiction, journalism, poetry, and stage melodramas; art works range from narrative paintings in oil to popular wood engravings.

Junior Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Michael Warner
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

This course is an introduction to the broad variety of antebellum American literature. We will read works in popular genres as well as the great writers of the period:  Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson. We will look at the growth of African-American writing in the context of antislavery; the development of a national book market and its association with national culture; the emergence of a language of environment; dilemmas of Romantic ecology and American pastoral; the emergence of the “ecological Indian” in the period of removal; the dynamic relation between evangelicalism and the secular; and the range of poetics from Bryant to Dickinson.

Junior Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit, American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Caleb Smith
TTh 11:35pm-12:25pm, HTBA

A survey of American literature from the late nineteenth century to the early twentieth. Social protest, literary experimentation, and avant-garde aesthetics. Readings may include works by Twain, DuBois, James, Stein, Williams, and Faulkner.

Also AMST 282

Lectures
American Lit; Pre-1900 with permission of instructor
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Joseph Roach
MW 1:30pm-3:20pm

Classical rhetoric, from Demosthenes to the digital age: the theory and practice of persuasive public speaking and speech writing.  Open to junior and senior Theater Studies majors, and to nonmajors with permission of the instructor. Students must preregister during the reading period of the preceding term.

Also THST 291

Junior Seminars
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm, HTBA

A survey of African American literature since 1970. Authors include Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Anna Deavere Smith, Danzy Senna, and others. Topics include black feminist literature, black gay and lesbian literature, developments in literary criticism and theory, and contemporary black drama.

Also AFAM 296/AMST 296/WGSS 292

Lectures
American Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Charles Musser
T 3:30pm-5:20pm; Screenings M 7:00-9:00

he history of novels and films about Hollywood. Ways in which the closely related forms of novel and film portray “the dream factory”—its past, present, and future—as well as the way the forms interact. Books include Merton at the Movies (1922), I Should Have Stayed Home (1938), Loves of the Last Tycoon (1940), and The Player (1988). Films include What Price Hollywood? (1932), A Star is Born (1937), Sunset Boulevard (1950), In a Lonely Place (1950), and The Player (1992). May not be taken after AMST S321/FILM S180.  Screenings TBA.

Also Film 476

Junior Seminars
American Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: David Bromwich, Professor: Dudley Andrew
T 1:30pm-3:20pm; Screenings M 6:30pm

Exploration of seven auteurs from Europe and Hollywood, 1937–1967. Assessment of methods that deepen appreciation of the films and the medium. 

Also FILM 242, HUMS 454, LITR 398.

Junior Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: J. D. McClatchy
T 1:30-3:20

A selective survey of the genre from its seventeenth-century Italian origins to the present day. The libretto’s history, from opera seria to opera comique to melodrama, featuring libretti by Hofmannsthal, W. S. Gilbert, and Auden. Emphasis on literary adaptations, from Da Ponte and Beaumarchais to Britten and Thomas Mann. Source material includes works by Shakespeare, Schiller, Hugo, Melville, and Tennessee Williams. Readings in English; musical background not required.

Also LITR 323, THST 303.

Junior Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Justin Neuman
MW 2:30pm-3:20pm, 1 HTBA

Survey of literary fiction from the late nineteenth century to the present in which globalization serves as a major theme and primary frame of reference. Vectors of globalization include energy, transportation, capital, drugs, war, media, tourism, and sexuality.

Also ER&M 236

Lectures
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Christian Wiman
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

Issues of faith examined through poetry, with a focus on modern Christian poems from 1850 to the present. Some attention to poems from other faith traditions, as well as to secular and antireligious poetry.

Also RLST 233.

Junior Seminars
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: David Gabriel

Major texts of Celtic literature, focusing on works from the birth of vernacular literature in the Middle Ages to the early modern period. Cultural, historical, and literary issues surrounding works in the Irish and Welsh languages; literary culture in Breton, Cornish, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx. Genres include lyric and bardic poetry, heroic and religious narrative, and early Arthurian works.

Readings in English translation; no knowledge of Celtic languages assumed.

Also LITR 463.

See OCI for meeting time.

Junior Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Jill Richards
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Survey of “young adult” fiction across the twentieth-century, focusing particularly on American writers. Topics include environmental apocalypse, biopolitics, youth indebtedness, juvenile sentencing, sexual violence, and racial profiling. Creative and critical writing components.

Junior Seminars
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Margaret Homans
WF 11:35pm-12:50pm

Historical survey of feminist and queer theory from the Enlightenment to the present, with readings from key British, French, and American works. Focus on the foundations and development of contemporary theory. Shared intellectual origins and concepts, as well as divergences and conflicts, among different ways of approaching gender and sexuality.

Also WGSS 340.

Junior Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Study of the Bible as a literature—a collection of works exhibiting a variety of attitudes toward the conflicting claims of tradition and originality, historicity and literariness. Pre-1800 with completion of supplementary assignments in the language of the King James Bible. If there is sufficient interest, a second section will be offered.

Also LITR 154

Junior Seminars
Pre-1800 with permission of instructor
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Justin Neuman
T 2:30-4:20

A study of novels and other writings of J. M. Coetzee, exploring issues of animal and human rights, apartheid, race, gender, colonialism and postcolonialism, sex, pain, religion, and globalization.

Senior Seminars
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Caryl Phillips
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

A study of literature that responds to a changing post–World War II Britain, with attention to the problem of who “belongs” and who is an “outsider.” Authors include Alan Hollinghurst, Kazuo Ishiguro, Colin McInnes, Samuel Selvon, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, and John Osborne.

Senior Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Katie Trumpener
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

Examination of ways that twentieth-century British, American, and anglophone writers rewrite, revise, and reconcile key novels by Jane Austen and Charlotte Brontë as prototypes of a women’s novel tradition. Particular attention to narrative voice, reader identification, and the novel’s function as a record of social norms and as an agent of historical change.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1900 Lit with permission of instructor
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: David Bromwich
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Reading and interpretation of selected histories and tragedies from Richard II to Coriolanus. Prerequisite: a previous course in Shakespeare.

Senior Seminars
Pre-1800 Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Ruth Yeazell
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

Selected novels by Henry James, from Roderick Hudson through The Golden Bowl. Particular attention to the international theme and to the ways in which James’s later novels revisit and transform the matter of his earlier ones.

Senior Seminars
American
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: James Berger
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

Attacks on and defenses of poetry in the broadest sense (as culture, the aesthetic, the humanities) from Plato to contemporary debates over the proper focus of education. The value of poetry in terms of knowledge claims, moral impact, economic utility, and other categories particular to artistic production and reception.

Also AMST 414.

Senior Seminars
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Stephanie Newell
Th 9:25am-11:15am

Introduces a range of experimental African novels. Engages with mythology, gender subversion, politics, the city, migration, and the self.

Senior Seminars
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Fred Strebeigh
Th 1:30pm-4:00pm

A nonfiction workshop, confronting the challenges of journalism as an art. Emphasis on voice and structure. Study of texts that may suggest modes, voices, forms, and styles for nonfiction pieces. Frequent writing projects and revisions.

Fall application due at noon on August 19.

For information on English 454, including a collection of work by past students called the English 454 Reader, please see: <https://webspace.yale.edu/engl454a> (available via Yale login). [Note, 8/12/2015: Yale accidentally disabled this site in July 2015. Now it is restored, with accurate information but from 2014.]

Here are opportunities to add strength to an English 454 application:

Writing samples:

            In the space where the application form asks students to paste “a writing sample of … about 4500 words of prose,” feel free to paste up to two pieces of any length (and even a third if its length is a page or less, such as a piece for Daily Themes). Strong applications often include some of the following: Reportorial work that has been published on campus or professionally. Innovative play with structure or voice, in any genre of writing.  Nonfiction writing for at least one and often both of the two samples.  Guidance by the author, particularly when samples are long, about where to look for the greatest strengths.

Proposals for work to write this term (perhaps the most valuable part of the application):

            Applicants for this course are invited to look at past work for this course and, by using that work as an indicator for what this course gives students an opportunity to create, to offer preliminary proposals for writing in the coming term. Work written by past students, much of it published soon after taking this course, is available via the English 454 Reader at <https://webspace.yale.edu/engl454a/reader.html>. Strong proposals in past have referred to previous student pieces as models for future ones. A proposal might include, for example, information such as this: “Much as Sarah Stillman immersed herself in the anti-sweatshop movement for her piece ‘Made by Us’ <https://webspace.yale.edu/engl454a/reader/2003/stillman.html> and also here <http://www.eliewieselfoundation.org/cm_images/uploadedimages/winnersessays/sarah_stillman.pdf>, I hope to immerse in _____ ; whereas Stillman used a hasty November trip to Florida to report one important scene, I have already done my reporting in _____ and have taken notes that guarantee the accuracy of my writing.  My piece will prove surprising and significant because ____ .” (As this phrasing suggests, the course is open to some past reportage, although much reporting will occur during the term.) In the form provided by the English department, proposals may be pasted after writing samples.

Printable version (PDF)

Creative Writing
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: J. D. McClatchy
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

A seminar and workshop in the writing of verse. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Fall application due at noon on August 19; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Caryl Phillips
T 2:30pm-4:20pm

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Fall application due at noon on August 19; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Steven Brill
M 9:00-10:50

ENGLISH 467A: JOURNALISM
Steven Brill ● sb@brillbusiness.com ● (212) 332-6301
Fall 2015

DESCRIPTION: This seminar – the core course for Yale Journalism Scholars – is for those interested in understanding the changing role of journalism, in coming to grips with the challenges and opportunities related to the business model of journalism in a digital, global age, and in learning the practice of journalism. Grades will be based on participation and written work, with an emphasis on the final project.

An emphasis will be placed on both imaginative and critical thinking as it applies to reporting and to creating ways and forms of telling a story so that it has maximum impact in a world cluttered with media and experiencing profound challenges to making journalism economically viable.

One or perhaps two extra (and voluntary) sessions will take place in New York City, so that students can meet with working journalists there.

I will meet with each student individually during the term as often as necessary in order to provide feedback, help with the final project, and (if requested) provide career guidance.

Guest instructors during three of the sessions will be Jill Abramson, Bob Woodward, and Gay Talese.

Successful completion of this course and other aspects of the Yale Journalism Scholars program will qualify students to be designated Yale Journalism Scholars. For more information on the Yale Journalism Scholars and the Yale Journalism Initiative, see http://www.yale.edu/writing/journalism.

INSTRUCTOR: Steven Brill, a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School, worked as a writer for New York Magazine, Esquire, and Harpers while in Law School. In 1978 he was the author of a best-selling book on the Teamsters Union. A year later, he launched The American Lawyer Magazine and later expanded it into ten legal publications across the country. In 1991 Brill launched Court TV and, in 1998, Brill’s Content Magazine. In 2002, Brill wrote a series of columns in Newsweek about America’s response to September 11, as well as After: The Rebuilding and Defending of America in the September 12 Era, which was published in 2003 by Simon & Schuster. In 2009, he founded Journalism Online, LLC, to enable newspapers, magazines, and online publishers to earn revenue from the journalism they publish online. In the last four years he has also written feature articles for The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, and TIME. In 2011, he wrote Class Warfare: Inside the Fight To Fix America’s Schools. He is also a weekly columnist for Reuters. In 2015, he authored a special edition of TIME Magazine – “Bitter Pill: How Medical Bills Are Killing Us” – about healthcare prices and profits. His book about
American healthcare and the fight over Obamacare was published in early 2015 by Random House.

MEETINGS: Mondays, 9:00 – 10:50 a.m. in LC 103

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS: The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. In general, we are looking for a range of students – some with demonstrated commitment to and experience in journalism, others without that background but who can write well, want to learn, and perhaps have an added dimension to offer in class discussions (such as an intense interest in politics, the arts, law, or economics), which they might want to apply to journalism.

Admission:

Each student must submit the following simple, two-part application package to sb@brillbusiness.com. I prefer that you submit the package by the evening of Monday, September 7, 2015.

If you want to submit your application earlier, you can submit it any time after August 15 – and in some cases I will admit students early who do so. If there are 15 well qualified applicants from among those applying early, I will send notice that the application process has closed as soon as it has.

However, if you first want to visit the introductory class on Friday, September 4 (which is the substitute for the regular Monday class because of Labor Day), that is fine.

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN by 11:59 PM on Monday, September 7. I will post with the English Department the final list of those accepted by Wednesday, September 9, if not earlier.

The two-part application should consist of:

1. No more than two double-spaced pages: A written statement explaining your interest in the class and in the Yale Journalism Scholars program. This should also include your Yale class year, any previous writing courses that you have taken, a brief description of your extra-curricular activities and a description of your journalism experience.

2. One writing sample – either an article that you have published in an on- or off- campus publication or something that you submitted for a class.

READINGS: The syllabus provides an outline of what we will cover in the course. The course packet is available at TYCO, and all books are available at the Yale bookstore. Most of the reading will be from the “Other Reading” materials described below, supplemented by these books:

BOOKS: John Hersey, Hiroshima
James Stewart, Follow the Story: How to Write Successful Non-Fiction
Gay Talese, The Gay Talese Reader
Steven Brill, America’s Bitter Pill – to be handed out in class.

OTHER READING: Numerous newspaper, magazine, and online “clips.”

Printable version (PDF)

Also PLSC 253.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Steven Brill
M 9:00-10:50

ENGLISH 467A: JOURNALISM
Steven Brill ● sb@brillbusiness.com ● (212) 332-6301
Fall 2015

DESCRIPTION: This seminar – the core course for Yale Journalism Scholars – is for those interested in understanding the changing role of journalism, in coming to grips with the challenges and opportunities related to the business model of journalism in a digital, global age, and in learning the practice of journalism. Grades will be based on participation and written work, with an emphasis on the final project.

An emphasis will be placed on both imaginative and critical thinking as it applies to reporting and to creating ways and forms of telling a story so that it has maximum impact in a world cluttered with media and experiencing profound challenges to making journalism economically viable.

One or perhaps two extra (and voluntary) sessions will take place in New York City, so that students can meet with working journalists there.

I will meet with each student individually during the term as often as necessary in order to provide feedback, help with the final project, and (if requested) provide career guidance.

Guest instructors during three of the sessions will be Jill Abramson, Bob Woodward, and Gay Talese.

Successful completion of this course and other aspects of the Yale Journalism Scholars program will qualify students to be designated Yale Journalism Scholars. For more information on the Yale Journalism Scholars and the Yale Journalism Initiative, see http://www.yale.edu/writing/journalism.

INSTRUCTOR: Steven Brill, a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School, worked as a writer for New York Magazine, Esquire, and Harpers while in Law School. In 1978 he was the author of a best-selling book on the Teamsters Union. A year later, he launched The American Lawyer Magazine and later expanded it into ten legal publications across the country. In 1991 Brill launched Court TV and, in 1998, Brill’s Content Magazine. In 2002, Brill wrote a series of columns in Newsweek about America’s response to September 11, as well as After: The Rebuilding and Defending of America in the September 12 Era, which was published in 2003 by Simon & Schuster. In 2009, he founded Journalism Online, LLC, to enable newspapers, magazines, and online publishers to earn revenue from the journalism they publish online. In the last four years he has also written feature articles for The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, and TIME. In 2011, he wrote Class Warfare: Inside the Fight To Fix America’s Schools. He is also a weekly columnist for Reuters. In 2015, he authored a special edition of TIME Magazine – “Bitter Pill: How Medical Bills Are Killing Us” – about healthcare prices and profits. His book about
American healthcare and the fight over Obamacare was published in early 2015 by Random House.

MEETINGS: Mondays, 9:00 – 10:50 a.m. in LC 103

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS: The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. In general, we are looking for a range of students – some with demonstrated commitment to and experience in journalism, others without that background but who can write well, want to learn, and perhaps have an added dimension to offer in class discussions (such as an intense interest in politics, the arts, law, or economics), which they might want to apply to journalism.

Admission:

Each student must submit the following simple, two-part application package to sb@brillbusiness.com. I prefer that you submit the package by the evening of Monday, September 7, 2015.

If you want to submit your application earlier, you can submit it any time after August 15 – and in some cases I will admit students early who do so. If there are 15 well qualified applicants from among those applying early, I will send notice that the application process has closed as soon as it has.

However, if you first want to visit the introductory class on Friday, September 4 (which is the substitute for the regular Monday class because of Labor Day), that is fine.

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN by 11:59 PM on Monday, September 7. I will post with the English Department the final list of those accepted by Wednesday, September 9, if not earlier.

The two-part application should consist of:

1. No more than two double-spaced pages: A written statement explaining your interest in the class and in the Yale Journalism Scholars program. This should also include your Yale class year, any previous writing courses that you have taken, a brief description of your extra-curricular activities and a description of your journalism experience.

2. One writing sample – either an article that you have published in an on- or off- campus publication or something that you submitted for a class.

READINGS: The syllabus provides an outline of what we will cover in the course. The course packet is available at TYCO, and all books are available at the Yale bookstore. Most of the reading will be from the “Other Reading” materials described below, supplemented by these books:

BOOKS: John Hersey, Hiroshima
James Stewart, Follow the Story: How to Write Successful Non-Fiction
Gay Talese, The Gay Talese Reader
Steven Brill, America’s Bitter Pill – to be handed out in class.

OTHER READING: Numerous newspaper, magazine, and online “clips.”

Printable version (PDF)

Also PLSC 253.

Creative Writing, Journalism
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Anne Fadiman
Th 2:30-5:20

A seminar and workshop with the theme “At Home in America.” Students consider the varied ways in which modern American literary journalists write about place, and address the theme themselves in both reportorial and first-person work.

Please read the description below, paying special attention to sections highlighted in bold, some of which describe exceptions to the standard application procedure.

The purpose of this course is to examine and attempt good nonfiction writing through the microcosm of setting. How do we see America (whether urban or rural, east or west, rich or poor) as home? We will attempt to dismantle some of the traditional barriers between academic reading and pleasure reading as we discuss works by Joan Didion, Ian Frazier, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, John McPhee, Gay Talese, and others. Students will write four pieces (two first-person, two reportorial), the last of which is a substantial profile reported in New Haven, outside the Yale campus, on someone found in the Greater New Haven Yellow Pages. They will also critique each other’s work both orally and via email. Each student will have at least six individual conferences with me, most of them an hour long, to discuss and edit his or her work.

Students who wish to apply to English 469 should submit the standard Application for Writing Courses to the class’s Drop Box by noon on Wednesday, August 19. Please note the following special instructions for English 469 applications:

1. The standard application specifies “a” writing sample. Ignore that! I can assess your work better if you submit two samples, totaling 5-15 pages. (If the total length exceeds that, please mark the sections to which I should pay particular attention.) You may even submit three if one is very short (for instance, a Daily Themes one-pager).

2. If possible, your samples should belong to the same genre we’ll be reading and writing (“non-non”–nonacademic nonfiction). Essays, literary journalism, and personal essays would all be appropriate. (If fiction is your strength, one but not both of your samples may be a short story. Similarly, if you’re a playwright, one sample may be a scene from a play. The other sample should be non-non.) Be sure to choose pieces that give your literary style a thorough airing.

3. Your “statement of purpose” should be a note that explains some things your samples won’t tell me. The application suggests “a short paragraph,” but you are welcome to write as long a note as you wish. For instance: Why do you want to take the class? What would you contribute to it? What writing experience and honors have you accumulated? (I’ll still consider you if the answer is None and None.) What are you majoring in? (English majors will receive no special preference.) Is there anything else that might help me understand you as a writer or a person?

4. When you list the writing classes you’ve taken, please include the class’s name and instructor, not just its number.

Once English 469 is up on Classesv2, the site will have a bit more information at the bottom of the course description, including the names of former students who have offered to answer questions about the class.

Printable version (PDF)

Creative Writing
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2015

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2015

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2015
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

A workshop that explores the sentence as the basic unit of writing and the smallest unit of perception. The importance of the sentence itself versus that of form or genre. Writing as an act of discovery. Includes weekly writing assignments. Not open to freshmen.

Fall application due at noon on August 19; see http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines for instructions.

Creative Writing
Hu
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Richard Deming
Th 2:30pm-3:45pm

A study of contemporary poetry and poetics that explores both literary criticism and creative writing. Ways to assess prevailing poetic values and articulate one’s own. Attention to critical skills for engaging recent developments in the field; development of a sense of the current aesthetic landscape. Includes four additional class meetings with influential contemporary poets who represent a variety of styles and modes.

Senior Seminar or Creative Writing. No advance application required.

Senior Seminars, Creative Writing
American Lit with permission of instructor (Senior Seminar only)
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Richard Deming
Th 2:30pm-3:45pm

A study of contemporary poetry and poetics that explores both literary criticism and creative writing. Ways to assess prevailing poetic values and articulate one’s own. Attention to critical skills for engaging recent developments in the field; development of a sense of the current aesthetic landscape. Includes four additional class meetings with influential contemporary poets who represent a variety of styles and modes.

Senior Seminar or Creative Writing. No advance application required.

Senior Seminars, Creative Writing
American Lit with permission of instructor (Senior Seminar only)
WR
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Ronald Jenkins

Through the study of theatrical works that have been adapted from sacred texts, the course introduces students to play writing techniques helpful for writing their own scripts based on a socially conscious reading of sacred texts. Possible collaboration with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals in adapting Dante’s Divine Comedy for the stage.

Also ER&M 437/THST 467

See THST for admission information. Meeting time to be posted on OCI.

Creative Writing
Term: Fall
2015

Special projects set up by the student in an area of particular interest with the help of a faculty adviser and the director of undergraduate studies, intended to enable the student to cover material not otherwise offered by the department. The course may be used for research or for directed reading, but in either case a term paper or its equivalent is normally required. The student meets regularly with the faculty adviser. To apply for admission, a student must submit an application and prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the office of the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 9, 2015, for spring-term projects and by April 22, 2016, for fall-term projects.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2015

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 13, 2015, for Spring 2016 projects and by April 14, 2016, for Fall 2016 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2015

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by November 13, 2015, for Spring 2016 projects and by April 14, 2016, for Fall 2016 projects. The project is due by the end of the last week of classes (fall term), or the end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term).

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for more information.

Application form is available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

Creative Writing, Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2015

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 9, 2015, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 22, 2016, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2015

Second term of the optional yearlong senior essay. Students may begin the yearlong essay in the spring term of the junior year, allowing for significant summer research, with permission of the instructor. After ENGL 490.

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 9, 2015, for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term; applications are due by April 22, 2016, for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application details and forms are available at http://english.yale.edu/undergraduate/applications-and-deadlines.

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Independent Projects
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Roberta Frank
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

The essentials of the language, some prose readings, and close study of several celebrated Old English poems.

Also LING 500.

Graduate Seminars
Medieval Lit
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Alastair Minnis
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

A study of The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame and The Legend of Good Women, in addition to a substantial selection of Canterbury Tales.  These texts are related to the “discourses of dissent” current in Chaucer’s day, an age of extreme political, social and intellectual turmoil.

Graduate Seminars
Medieval Lit
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Lawrence Manley
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

A study of the representation of history on the English stage in the reigns of Elizabeth I and James I.  Plays by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Peele, Heywood, Ford and others in relation to both non-dramatic forms of historical writing and contemporary affairs.

Graduate Seminars
Early Modern Lit
Term: Fall
2015
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

A consideration of the long narrative poems of the nineteenth century, from The Prelude and Don Juan to works by Clough, Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Robert Browning. We will look at how these poems engage with competing genres and modes—including epic, the novel, drama, and lyric—in order to tell a story.

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Michael Warner
Th 9:25am-11:15am

An introduction to both the primary texts and the current scholarship in the field, including transatlantic and hemispheric perspectives; the public sphere; evangelicalism and the secular; the rise of African-American public intellectuals; varieties of pastoral in contexts of settler colonialism; cultural geographies of literary capitals and the backcountry; nationalism; polite letters and popular genres; Native American literacies; the early American novel; and the modern social imaginary.  Writers and preachers studied will include Cotton Mather, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Samson Occom, Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, Phyllis Wheatley, John Marrant, Thomas Jefferson; Thomas Paine, Judith Sargeant Murray, Timothy Dwight,  Charles Brown.  The course will end with generation of Washington Irving, William Cullen Bryant, James Fenimore Cooper, and Catherine Sedgwick.

Also AMST 710.

Graduate Seminars
18th-/19th-Century Lit
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Amy Hungerford
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

This graduate seminar examines the American understanding of solitude in the context of social and non-human worlds. Topics include environment and solitude, celibacy, urban solitude, religiously or politically motivated social withdrawal, punitive isolation, physical solitude within virtual connectedness, and contagious loneliness. We will examine how the practices of reading and writing, both prose and lyric, from the 19th century to the present, configure these forms of socially networked solitude. Including readings from Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, Poe, Sherwood Anderson, Ellison, Reisman, Thomas Merton, Jack Kerouac, Paul Bowles, Annie Dillard, Rebeca Solnit, Marilynne Robinson, Colson Whitehead, and Michael Clune. Additional readings include J.S. Mill and recent lyric theory; Simmel, Goffman and Riesman; readings on punitive and religious solitudes.

Also AMST 897.

Graduate Seminars
19th- or 20th-Century Lit with permission of instructor
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: James Berger
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

This course will provide an introduction to some key topics in contemporary disability studies.  Students will read sources on the history of the disability rights movement in the United States, and texts on modes of theorizing disability and how these theorizations intersect with and sometimes contest the movement’s political assertions.  Encounters with artistic and other cultural representations of disability have been central to disability studies, so students will read or view significant literary and cinematic accounts of disability.  Finally, the class will contend with important recent ethical issues pertaining to disability: questions of eugenics, genetic screening, euthanasia, the ethics of care, and disability in a global perspective.

Also AMST 865.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit with permission of instructor
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Joseph Roach
W 9:25am-11:15am

Taking account of the genealogy of modern drama in eighteenth-century performance, this seminar considers critical theories of the culture industry in relationship to selected canonical plays and popular theater-historical events from Oroonoko (1695) to Oroonoko, a new adaptation by Biyi Bandele (1999), and from The Beggar’s Opera (1728) to The Threepenny Opera (1928).  Topics include the transformation of classical genres into the drame, the commercialization of leisure through the mass-marketing of vicarious experience, and the emerging culture of celebrity.  Critical readings include selections from the Frankfurt School, Walter Benjamin, Bertolt Brecht, Raymond Williams, Roland Barthes, and Jean Baudrillard.  Plays are drawn from popular comedies, Sheridan to Shaw (Pygmalion and My Fair Lady), and long-running bourgeois dramas, beginning with Lillo’s The London Merchant.  Readings will be supplemented by selected materials on theatrical production, acting, and management.

Also AMST 677, CPLT 914.

Graduate Seminars
18th-, 19th-, or 20th-C Lit with permission of instructor
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Langdon Hammer
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

This course will investigate contemporary debates about the nature of lyric poetry.  Recent statements by Mutlu Blasing, Jonathan Culler, Virginia Jackson, Simon Jarvis, and Gillian White will be set in a post-Romantic tradition in which lyric poetry, dramatic monologue, and avant-garde collage compete with and comment on each other.  We will read representative essays from the New Criticism, Deconstruction, Russian Formalism, and the Language movement, alongside modernist poetry by Wallace Stevens, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Marianne Moore, and Hart Crane, and new poetry by John Ashbery, Claudia Rankine, Srikanth Reddy, and Susan Howe.

Graduate Seminars
20th-/21st-Century Lit
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Alfred Guy
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

An introduction to the teaching of literature and writing with attention to the history of the profession and current issues in higher education. Weekly seminars address a series of issues about teaching: guiding classroom discussion; introducing students to various literary genres; formulating aims and assignments; grading and commenting on written work; lecturing and serving as a teaching assistant; preparing syllabuses and lesson plans.

Graduate Seminars
2nd-Year Requirement
Term: Fall
2015
Professor: Janice Carlisle

Training for graduate students teaching introductory expository writing. Students plan a course of their own design on a topic of their own choosing, and they then put theories of writing instruction into practice by teaching a writing seminar. Prerequisite: open only to graduate students teaching ENGL 114.

Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
2015

Designed to help fill gaps in students programs when there are corresponding gaps in the department’s offerings. By arrangement with faculty and with the approval of the DGS.

Graduate Seminars
Term: Fall
2015