Courses

Professor: Heather Klemann
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”            —Henry Ford

This course studies the anatomy of big ideas. We can offer only abstract predictions about the future of a world in which machine learning, neural lace, biointelligence, and self-driving cars will become commonplace. Instead, this course asserts that we have much to learn from how scientists, entrepreneurs, and educators argue over such predictions. What makes an idea revolutionary or contrarian in an age when so much knowledge is at our fingertips? How do we speak about that which is yet unknowable? How are narratives about superintelligence composed through disciplines of economics, philosophy, religion, and engineering; the worlds of finance and entrepreneurship; and the concepts of evolution, futurism, and humanism? And what kinds of racial, gender, or class inequalities might superhuman intelligence reinforce or dissolve? Our course materials include peer-reviewed scholarly research, documentary film, and in-class interviews with contemporary entrepreneurs. Throughout the course, we will reflect on what these issues mean for developing our own strategies of reading, writing, and public speaking—what will we really need in a world with superhuman intelligence and with what can we dispense?

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Anusha Alles
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Cannibal, curry-muncher, sugar baby, oreo, white bread, strange fruit. Why is eating so intertwined with modern experiences of racial, gender, and sexual difference? Examining consumption practices, this seminar explores relations between the body, land, labor, and imperial power.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Is there really a separation of Church and State in America? Is religion a private matter? Has modernity marginalized religion? In this course, we will examine the role of religion in the public sphere, and we will challenge our understanding of what it means to be religious in a secular world. According to Charles Taylor, we in the West have come to a point where belief in God is no longer unchallenged and the presumption of unbelief is dominant, especially in intellectual milieus. In spite of the decline in religious belief, however, contemporary debates on marriage and sexuality, gender, and race hinge on notions of religious morality. What might these conversations reveal about the boundary between religion and politics? Is a secular outlook the solution to the challenges of religious diversity in America? We will read essays on these debates in disciplines as varied as law, biology, theology, philosophy, anthropology, and race and gender studies. As we explore the relationship between religion and secularity, we will also be concerned with how religion affects the more intimate aspects of our lives. How does religion constitute our identity and define our relationship to others? How does belief or unbelief influence our sense of purpose and fulfillment? We will examine the tensions, conflicts, and anxieties religion inspires in our public and private lives.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

“Rebellion,” writes Albert Camus, is “more than pursuit of a claim.” When someone rebels, he “demonstrates with obstinacy, that there is something in him which is worth-while” and that implicit in the act of rebellion is a “spontaneous loyalty to certain aspects of himself.” In these times of intensifying political activism, we might think of challenges to authority or dissent as the struggle against oppression, the fight for social justice, or the defense of some ideal. But as Camus suggests, our individual and collective identities are also deeply implicated in the causes we take up. How do discourses of resistance legitimate marginalized identities? In this course, we will seek to understand the ideologies that motivate dissent and how these discourses subvert social, political, and religious orthodoxies. How do embodied contradictions of cultural norms complicate our ideas about race, class, gender, and sexuality? Is dissent always empowering? Drawing from a range of perspectives in disciplines that include psychology, anthropology, sociology, theology, philosophy, critical theory, and performance studies, we will seek to establish how resistant thinking and practice shape identity and culture. These various perspectives will inform our discussions on topics such as colonialism, civil rights, and contemporary movements like Zionism and Black Lives Matter.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Jason Bell
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Do we live in the worst of all possible worlds? If your answer to this question is “yes,” you might be a pessimist. Philosophershave debated for centuries whether human beings are innately good or evil, whether history leads to perfection or descends into madness, and whether life is joy or endless suffering. In 2017, as nuclear superpowers face-off and climate change threatens the biosphere, these ancient questions have gained new urgency. On the side of sorrow, the pessimist sings with Townes Van Zandt, “we all got holes to fill / them holes are all that’s real.” She echoes Voltaire, who writes that we are “born to endure either the convulsions of anxiety or the lethargy of boredom.” Buteven when confronted with misery, a pessimist need not be nihilistic, conservative, depressed, or unhappy. In this course, we consider how pessimism has been an essential if controversial resource for revolutionary politics. We begin by introducing a set of classic debates on pessimism.Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Marx, and Camus all disputed the likelihood of human progress, the relationship of slavery to civilization, and the most ethical means of achieving freedom. The second and third parts of the course concern extensions of those debates into the 21st century. First, we study the Afro-Pessimists, a group of thinkers who believe, in the words of Frank Wilderson III, that the entire world “is sutured by anti-Black solidarity.” We investigate how Afro-Pessimism has shaped arguments about reparations for slavery, black feminism, and science fiction. Then, we look at the place of pessimism in queer life, specifically, the global AIDS crisis, the fight for marriage equality, and decolonization. We will ask, how have pessimists imagined a future free from oppression, if not pain? What value can we find in our lives under such conditions? And perhaps most significantly, where (if it all) can we build a just society in a broken world? 

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Timothy Robinson
TTh 4:00pm-5:15pm

What right does any authority have to control expression? This writing seminar will treat legal and critical debates from recent times, as well as various arguments concerning politics, artistic freedom, and religion, ranging from those of Plato to Tipper Gore.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Jami Carlacio
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

Every day, at every hour, we are bombarded by hundreds of news items via traditional broadcast and print outlets, social media sites, blogs, wikis, podcasts, and more. Confronted with so much information, we must decide what news to consume and which source(s) to trust. The stakes are high: what is available to us and on what platforms affect our choices to take (or not take) action, engage in civil protest, vote in key elections, conserve resources, and more. The rapid and radical changes we witness in our news and information environment make public and private decisions even more difficult, particularly in a global context. In a democratic society, the media are expected to create an informed citizenry able to debate issues in the public sphere. But are they doing their job? How might the news manufacture our consent—that is, to what extent do media shape our opinions rather than create the conditions for democracy?

The central questions of this course include: What role do the media play in US democracy? How has news production and consumption changed, with the rise of citizen journalists? Because most of our news now comes to us in digital form, we must ask ourselves, how do digital forms of news production and consumption affect American democracy?

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Jami Carlacio
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Committed not just to their own rights but rather to the greater social good, women in the United States since the nineteenth century have been key players in shaping a democracy. Ignoring resistance to their self-proclaimed authority and right to move from the domestic to the political sphere, they often allied with men in achieving urgent political and social reforms, from abolishing slavery to attaining suffrage, from eradicating exploitative labor practices to gaining civil rights for racial minorities and gays and lesbians. In 2017, the need for social justice is still urgent, and the challenges to their authority nearly as strong. Rising to the occasion, women have led protests and spearheaded movements in order to protect their right to make their own healthcare choices, to challenge laws that inhibit LGBTQIA people’s freedom to express their gender and sexual identity, to change economic and environmental policies that specifically harm disadvantaged people, and to end discriminatory practices that affect primarily racial and ethnic minorities and immigrants. Noteworthy as these efforts are, they have met with varying degrees of success.

Students in this course will grapple with difficult questions such as these: In fighting for equal rights and social justice, to what extent have women really been instrumental, and can their efficacy be measured? How have women responded to gendered challenges to their authority and how have white women in particular responded to race-based criticisms leveled against them in their effort to achieve social and political reform? This writing-intensive course will include work in a digital environment.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Alison Coleman
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

What is family? Who can or cannot constitute a family? How do external forces—ranging from war to social media to the economy—affect families around the globe today? And why have so many writers throughout the ages, whether comedian or critic, philosopher or politician, been inspired to take up the topic? In this writing seminar, we will examine the institution and the concept of family through a range of scholarly lenses including history, law, literature, psychology, and sociology. Taking our cue from the signs and symbols of family that proliferate in the world around us, a selection of academic texts on the subject, and our own experiences as well as the lives of those around us, we will deconstruct the term “family” in an effort to analyze its many facets and implications. Through our writings and in our class discussions, we will ask: How do I define family—and how does family define me?

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Craig Eklund
MW 9:00am-10:15am

What is the self? Paradoxically, the closest thing to us is the most obscure of all. This course explores the seminal questions of selfhood (free will, subjectivity, consciousness) and novel insights offered by neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and, yes, selfies.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Greg Ellermann
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Today, most of us would accept the claim that art is political. TV shows, movies, music – we assume that such cultural objects can express ideals, make arguments, represent characters in politically significant ways, and even teach us how the world works. But where do our intuitions come from? Do they stand up to scrutiny? Drawing on perspectives from philosophy, political theory, the history of media, black studies, and gender studies, this class explores the uneasy place that artworks occupy on the terrain of the political. To begin, we will consider the status of art in the modern world. How do the economic and technological transformations of modernity change our sense of art’s capabilities? In response to this question, we raise the thorny issue of mass culture and its relation to high art and artistic subcultures. Can art today ever be more than a commodity? What does it mean to create in opposition to the mainstream? We then delve into the ongoing debate about the politics of vision, representation, and the gaze in film and other visual media. We will consider in detail the limits of what art can or should show us, without giving up on the idea that art reveals the world in new and life-altering ways.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: James Ensley
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

What is a book? From papyrus to paperbacks, humans have cataloged their thoughts, desires, mindless scribblings, and greatest works of art in myriad physical forms. Most familiar to us is the ubiquitous form of the book. What, however, makes a reader understand something as a book? Is it the shape and form of the book? Does the author make the book? Or, perhaps the genre gives shape to the book. Does the physical form of the book change our understanding of its contents or even the way we read? How do communities form around books? At stake in these questions is not just what constitutes a book but also how we imagine the process of reading and the ways it is structured both materially and societally.

This course asks you to contemplate and write about what makes a book both materially and textually across a broad historical span, from medieval manuscripts and Victorian serial novels to Harry Potter and steamy romances. Readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines like history, philosophy, sociology, cognitive science, economics, and English, and from a variety of authors like Barthes, Chartier, and Bourdieu among others. Drawing heavily on Beinecke Rare Book Library and British Arts Center resources, this course will ask you to physically interact with material books from a variety of periods and invite you to consider the social and cultural ramifications of how we read these objects. Using these resources, you will begin to formulate your own answers to the question of who or what makes a book.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Seo Hee Im
MW 4:00pm-5:15pm

What compels us to live like Spartans when we could all be hedonists? In this course, you will think and write critically about the commonplace imperative to improve yourself and the world. Topics include the discourse of self-optimization, with its emphasis on education, training, and practice; the rise of occupational burnout; the persistent drive to expand markets abroad and the concomitant return of racism and xenophobia; and extreme pursuits of physical perfection from the cult of CrossFit to detox diets. 

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

How do we make sense of social divisions? Why do those divisions seem to have intensified in recent years? And what is to be done about them? This course seeks to shed light on the persistent problem of inequality by querying what we mean when we say equality today. Perhaps most provocatively, we will spend a good deal of time making heretical if corollary inquiries: What if the trouble lies with the notion of equality itself? To do so we will tarry with a few historical touchstones such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Discourse on the Origin of Inequality and the Declaration of Independence. From there we will take up the trouble with equality today in terms of race, gender, sexuality, and class before bringing what we glean to bear upon how the Black Lives Matter movement responds to mass incarceration and the legacy of slavery. We will conclude by examining the rise of the Alt-Right and no-platform campaigns that have reignited debates over free speech on campus here at Yale and elsewhere.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

What is the purpose of college? How should you spend your time while you are here? What roles do institutions of higher education play in our society and what kind of society are they helping to build? Are they succeeding or failing, and for whom? This course considers the variety of purposes with which individuals and institutions might approach the project of higher education: as individual self-cultivation, professional development and credentialing, or training in practices of citizenship, to name a few. Our readings draw from philosophy, political theory, sociology, and educational theory and include the works of Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt, Danielle Allen, bell hooks, Paulo Freire, and Tressie McMillan Cottom.  This course asks you to think critically and imaginatively about the meaning of your own time spent in this institution and then to contextualize your experience – to understand the diverse roles which institutions of higher education have played in American society, their various purposes, functions, and points of access.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

During NFL preseason last year, Colin Kaepernick sat quietly during the national anthem to protest the treatment of African Americans in the United States.  It took two games before anyone noticed; when they did, the responses starkly divided locker rooms, clubhouses, and dinner tables that include the “stick to sports” crowd who imagine sports as an escape from the problems of the world to the those who see politics influencing every aspect of life, even our games. Kaepernick is not the first to use his platform as an athlete to advocate for social change, following in the footsteps of Jackie Robinson and Muhammad Ali. But his choice reminds us that sports are a nexus of values in our culture. In this class, we will think about race and society through our favorite games. From arguments over mascots in Cleveland and Washington, D.C., to questions of masculinity in the NFL, to protest and self-assertion in the WNBA, teams and individuals have added their voice to this conversation for decades. How do sports fit into our social consciousness? What does acceptable protest look like if such a thing is possible? Is celebrity a proper platform to discuss race and social justice? Can our favorite games can teach us more than the fundamentals of skill, technique, and teamwork and perhaps provide a new framework for analyzing our world?

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Pamela Newton
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Modern cities challenge us to build communities on a large scale. In this seminar we explore what we want from our cities and what they tell us about ourselves.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

In the last year, President Donald Trump has planned to deport millions of Mexican Americans and build a multi-billion dollar wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Although Trump’s ideas often seem unprecedented, they are rooted in previous attempts to manage mobile communities, police international boundaries, and define national identities. In this course, we will situate current events in the social, cultural, and environmental histories of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. By drawing on anthropology, geography, philosophy, history, literature, and political science, we will ask and answer a range of questions about this inequitable yet interdependent region: How has the U.S. tried to control indigenous and Mexican territories? How have conquered people and migrants adapted to and influenced their new homes? How have ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, and class operated on both sides of the border? These historical questions will lead us to a range of theoretical inquiries: What are borders—are they physical boundaries, or are they psychosocial conditions? Similarly, what are nations—are they flexible and diverse communities, or are they stable and homogeneous groups? Ultimately, what are human beings—do they have inalienable rights, or can they be labeled as illegal aliens? In a world increasingly divided between citizens and migrants, we will use writing as a form of critical reasoning, cross-cultural understanding, and political debate.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Ittai Orr
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

What are the signs and symptoms of a sick society? What makes society healthy or ill? This course asks you to inhabit the role of social doctor, adept at reading features of societies local and abroad for greater patterns. We will attempt to find the causal roots of addiction and substance abuse, a widening wealth—and health—gap between the richest and poorest humans, the rise of the zombie in pop culture, the phenomenon of freak shows or the invention of soap, to name just a few symptoms. We will examine and assess influential social theories put forward since the Eighteenth Century by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Max Weber, Ferdinand Tönnies, and Sigmund Freud, and debate the advantages and disadvantages of empiricism in assessing social ills, the meaning of realism and idealism in social thinking, models of health, and the pitfalls of critique and social theory. Ultimately, we will take features of contemporary American society we believe indicate illness to formulate our own explanatory theories to be published in a new undergraduate journal of cultural criticism called Diagnosis.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Justin Park
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Do we really need empathy? Is “putting yourself in another’s shoes” the remedy to the political, racial, and economic divisions that fill our headlines and newsfeeds? In 2006, then senator Barack Obama suggested as much when he argued that a “sense of empathy” needs to “infuse our politics.” But is there a limit to what empathy can do? Is putting yourself in another’s place even possible? If it is, whom should we feel empathy for?

We will start with Adam Smith’s influential work on empathy, asking what are empathy’s necessary conditions, along with Achille Mbembe’s work on enmity and society. Then we will move to cognitive science and studies on empathy produced in readers of literary fiction; we will test those claims by reading Recitatif by Toni Morrison. We will examine “empathy-projects”: contemporary works that mobilize a radical engagement with empathy to transform a reader’s position on such issues as trans rights, class politics in the 21st century, neo-liberalism and the commodification of emotion, and the clash between religion and medicine. We will conclude by asking if humans are the only fit subject for empathy. What about animals, the environment, and even machines? We will ask: what does it take for empathy to transform the subject and what are the limits of that transformation? As Anne Fadiman writes, “empathy is so hard – harder than anger, harder than pity.”

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Peter Raccuglia
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Writing about love, like being in love, can make us sloppy thinkers. To love passionately, we are told, is to give oneself over, willingly or not, to the irrational. Love is a subject we associate with poetry and pop songs, not with serious scholarship. This class will ask you to resist that stereotype by thinking critically and writing clearly about love, sex, and intimacy. We will range over some of love’s many histories, theories, psychologies, and biologies, in order to better understand how our culture “makes” love today. We will ask why love hurts with Eva Illouz and doubt love with Judith Butler. We will consider the history of sexuality with Michel Foucault and imagine the future of sex with Emily Witt. We will try to understand what love has to do with the politics of race, gender, sexuality, and empire. And we’ll end by bringing fresh eyes to two of the most powerful meditations on modern love in American culture: Beyoncé’s Lemonade and Barry Jenkins’s Moonlight.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Palmer Rampell
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

In an era pervaded by alarms about the death of privacy, this course asks: Why does privacy matter to us? What are its origins? Does it protect all equally? Topics to be considered include: abortion, digital surveillance, and social media.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Stephanie Ranks
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

What do we risk when we speak out against the state?  If a government or institutional authority can declare anything it doesn’t like to be seditious, is speech really free?  Modern institutions, from governments to corporations to universities, have adopted “sedition” as a term of disapprobation against subjects, workers, and members who engage in protest.  How does the need for a law against speech that incites social and political upheaval square with free speech values and First Amendment rights?  Through contemporary theorists and historical authors, we will consider how radical speech has been punished and restricted over time.  Our conversations will expand into topics as diverse as the ethics of protest, the necessity of investigative journalism, and the consequences – like charges of treason – that make “free speech” such a precarious category.  We will ask who has the right to speak freely, whether speech can constitute a kind of action, and how these thorny issues have been translated into our current political moment.  We will look at how this topic has been treated through a range of lenses: literary critical, historical, legal, political.  And we will ask ourselves how these questions have been mapped onto the recent explosion of free speech debates across college campuses nationwide.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Anna Shechtman
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

What is the avant-garde? Many would answer this question negatively: avant-garde art is not mainstream, not produced for large audiences, and neither conventional nor conservative. In other words, the avant-garde is frequently defined against “mass culture.” The history of cultural production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, however, reveals that mass culture and avant-garde art movements have been in sustained dialogue. Andy Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Cans,” (1962) for example, mimics the graphics of midcentury advertising; Douglas Gordon’s “24 Hour Psycho” (1993) brings Alfred Hitchcock’s Hollywood film into the art gallery. This course explores the creative cross-pollination between mass culture and avant-garde art, examining key concepts in the history of American cultural capital—middlebrow, pop culture, kitsch—along the way. In tracing the historical evolutions of these terms, we will identify the ways in which class, race, gender, and sexuality have informed them. Focusing primarily on visual media — painting, photography, film, and digital images — we will develop a language with which to discuss the history of modern art and consumerism. Ultimately, we will engage with critics and artists whose work has questioned the very definition of art itself.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Alexia Williams
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

The concept of self-love is saturated with personal, political and commercial value—self-care, self-esteem, self-indulge, self-defense, selfish. In her 1988 book of essays A Burst of Light, Audre Lorde famously wrote, “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” In this writing seminar, we examine how self-love is socially and politically constructed in ways that reflect experiences of race in the United States.  What role has self-care played in social resistance movements? What does it mean for people of color to love themselves in the face of institutionalized racial hatred? How do race and ethnicity shape our definitions of self-esteem and our capacities to possess it?  We will engage these questions through a variety of academic disciplines including cultural studies, music theory, political science, psychology, literary criticism, religion and philosophy.  In our era of commodified mindfulness, activist fatigue, the life-changing magic of tidying, minimalism, Oprah, Beyoncé and tea, when is the love of oneself radical?

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

This class will consider why the Farm Bill, an almost invisible piece of legislation for food policy, has such far-reaching implications and whether the industrial agriculture that feeds our nation has failed us. We will discuss how best to effect change in our food system.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Rasheed Tazudeen
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

How are identities shaped by the sounds and noises we hear? How does sound, and music, influence the construction of our world? This course will investigate the cultural and political role of sound and music from Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo to Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Rasheed Tazudeen
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

While we tend to speak about “life” as a self-evident concept, the meaning of life has been persistently redefined according to historical pressures and philosophical, scientific, and aesthetic ideas. This course explores contestations over the meaning of life from Ancient Greece to the present.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Craig Eklund
WF 11:35am–12:50pm

The meaning and value of racial, sexual, and political identities are hotly contested in our world today.  Who and what we are, however, does not begin and end with our identification with a group.  We also tend to think of ourselves as possessed of something that is uniquely ours, an intangible thing we call the self.  On the face of it, this idea is as plain as can be (for we all know that we are selves, after all), but, on closer examination, it becomes apparent that the nature of the self is vague and indeterminate.  This course confronts the paradox that the closest thing to us is the most obscure of all.  What is the self?  Over the semester, through works of philosophy, fiction, film, and self-portraiture, we will explore the seminal questions of selfhood: identity, free will, subjectivity, morality, and the nature of consciousness.  We will also take up novel perspectives on the self offered by new disciplines, technologies, and trends, turning to neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and, yes, selfies.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Lukas Moe
WF 11:35am-12:50pm

Movements like Civil Rights capture our imagination with their demands for justice but also with their aesthetics. This seminar asks why we protest in light of how we do it—in meetings, in books, in art, and in the streets.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Since its invention, photography has changed humans’ relationships to their environments in unprecedented and irreversible ways.  In this class, we will ask how both writing and photography offer new ways of imagining such fundamental concepts as space and time; nature and technology; race, class, and gender; violence and social change. We will learn how to “read” photographs—and their successors, from digital installation art to social media—for insights into our society’s changing understanding of itself. Lastly, by looking at writing through the “lens” of photography, we will explore the relationship between visual and verbal rhetoric in our contemporary world.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.
 

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Clara Wild
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

After the 2015 mass shooting at Charleston’s Emanuel AME Church, White House spokesman Eric Schultz reiterated President Obama’s belief that the Confederate flag belongs in a museum. What distinction is Schultz making here between monuments and museums? Whose experiences are represented in museums and monuments? And who gets left out? In this course, you will explore how cultural identities and values are expressed, transmitted, and curated through museums and monuments. This course draws readings from a variety of disciplines, including history, law, anthropology, philosophy, and art history and will explore how people have interacted with objects and things foreign to everyday experience from medieval relic collections to Sea World. There will also be a number of opportunities to explore the many museums and monuments throughout New Haven.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Leah Mirakhor
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as the city, childhood, globalization, inequality, food culture, sports, and war.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Sarah Robbins
TTh 4:00pm-5:15pm

Is utopia a “good place,” or is it “no place” at all? At what point does social dreaming beget a social nightmare? In this seminar, we will examine texts whose authors are troubled by the hindrances and horizons of utopian thinking.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Timothy Kreiner
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Few social issues are more pivotal today than those that animate the Black Lives Matter movement. Those issues have a long history, however, in art as well as politics. Indeed, the historical devaluation of black life casts a long shadow over the formation of American literature. From the era of slavery to what many theorists view as the racialized expansion of the US prison system in recent decades, black life has been a major if often marginalized force shaping literary history. At the same time, literature has often been a proving ground for competing forms of antiracist politics. This course explores that force and those forms through a broad overview spanning from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass to recent writings by Toni Morrison, Fred Moten, and Claudia Rankine. Along the way we will also take up work by writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, and Amiri Baraka.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Angus Ledingham
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Do you own yourself? How much control do you have over what people know about you? If you open up to a public (large or small), are you are asserting your autonomy or leaving yourself vulnerable? Why do we tell invisible/anonymous strangers things that we would never disclose in an ordinary conversation? In this course we will consider what it means to “give yourself away.” We start by looking at tells – unconscious signals of hidden motives and desires – as they’ve been construed in genres as diverse as psychoanalysis, detective fiction, and nineteenth-century “dramatic monologues.” As the course progresses we will consider the risks people take by exposing themselves to public scrutiny; Western culture’s longstanding anxieties about chastity and its lapses (the fear that one might “give away” one’s virtue); and what it might mean to be truly “self-possessed.” We will hone our skills as critical and attentive readers of literary and cinematic texts, while consistently returning to questions of ethics, sexuality and publicity. Readings include William Shakespeare’s King Lear, Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, Martin Scorsese’s The King of Comedy, and poetry by William Wordsworth, Walt Whitman, Claudia Rankine, and others.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Katja Lindskog
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Game of Thrones tells us that winter is coming – but why is it coming? What causes an entire world’s climate to change? In this seminar, we will read literary texts that provide thought-provoking answers to that question. Moving across a variety of genres, we will see magical forest creatures, coal miners, and post-apocalyptic scavengers work with, and struggle against, their environments in ways that reflect changing attitudes to how we should relate to nature. From Shakespeare and Dickens to today’s bestsellers and disaster movies, fiction helps us see that in our world (unlike in Westeros), structured labor – the way we organize different forms of work – has played a huge part in shaping our environment.

It often seems as if our jobs and prosperity are separate from that of our planet. But what happens to our work when the planet can no longer support us? Do we change how we make our living, in order to save ourselves? With the sinking cities and burning plains of yesterday’s science fiction becoming tomorrow’s reality, can literature help us figure out where to go from here? In class we will ask these questions – and many more – while moving through literary, cinematic, theoretical, and historical texts. We will disagree, agree, persuade, and generally wander in and around these materials to better understand how they are put together. These conversations will provide a model for what literary arguments can look like. We’ll see how fiction bears witness to the ecological emergency produced by our systems of labor – but the works we read will also offer hope; for survival, and for a more just and resilient future.

Though the object of our investigation is literature, this is a writing course above all. We will work together on strategies for pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing. We will also discuss methods of source interpretation, research, and documentation. We will refine the skills inherent in critical writing through a process of radical revision, in which you will learn to read your own and your classmates’ writing with a critical eye, transforming it into a sophisticated, refined, and persuasive final product.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Ryan Wepler
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Can reading good literature make you a good person? Does encountering art that challenges your certainties, broadens your experience, and probes the limits of existence make you more sensitive to your own personhood and the humanity of others? In this course we will consider what makes literature good and how good literature moves us. Our collective goal will not just be to produce a theory of good literature, but to experience its goodness, to develop your capacity to be moved by a literary work and reflect on what happened to you during that process. Readings range from popular successes to great masterpieces and include: Mrs. Dalloway (Woolf), Absalom, Absalom! (Faulkner); short fiction and excerpts by Sir. Arthur Conan Doyle, Mark Twain, Flannery O’Connor, O Henry, Jorge Luis Borges, Kurt Vonnegut, Karen Russell, George Saunders, and E. L. James; selected poetry; and one of the Harry Potter films.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Margaret Deli
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Rosemary Jones
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Susan Hartman
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Briallen Hopper
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Briallen Hopper
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Pamela Newton
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Mark Oppenheimer
MW 9:00am-10:15am

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
MW 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Palmer Rampell
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Barbara Riley
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Adam Reid Sexton
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Kim Shirkhani
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Kim Shirkhani
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Fred Strebeigh
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Barbara Stuart
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Andrew Ehrgood
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Law has an intellectual structure of its own, and the lawyers and judges who make law and interpret it have peculiar ways of imagining and talking about the world, habits of thought and expression that can mystify the nonlawyer. In this course, you will begin to learn to read and speak and write the lawyer’s language: you will learn to reason and argue in distinctively lawyerly ways about the sorts of problems that lawyers are paid to attend to. And as you acquire and become adept at this odd language, you will also evaluate it, assessing its appeal and usefulness to you as a thinker, writer, and citizen.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Randi Epstein
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Medical and public health stories shape the way individuals view health and disease. The coverage can influence scientific research or health policy. This course will give students the chance to join this conversation by writing about medicine and public health for general audiences and also for scientists. To do this well, students must develop a keen sense of audience as they translate complicated science, explain its ramifications, and provide historical context. Students will write breaking news stories, blog posts, a researched feature article, and a personal essay. They will also have the chance to interview a patient from Yale-New Haven Hospital, a physician, and researchers.

In class, we will analyze essays, book chapters, and news stories for craft. Students will also explore visual media to hone observational skills, and we’ll visit the Center for British Art for a workshop on observation developed for Yale medical students.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

 

 

Introductory Classes
WR
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Danielle Chapman
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Introductory Classes
Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Richard Deming
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Introductory Classes
Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Derek Green
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Introductory Classes
Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Brandon Menke
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Introductory Classes
Hu
Term: Fall
2017
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the seventh through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the many varieties of identity and authority in early literary cultures. Readings may include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Middle English lyrics, The Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and poems by Isabella Whitney, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanyer, John Donne, and George Herbert, among others.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Jessica Brantley
TTh 9:00am-10:15am

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the seventh through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the many varieties of identity and authority in early literary cultures. Readings may include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Middle English lyrics, The Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and poems by Isabella Whitney, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanyer, John Donne, and George Herbert, among others.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the seventh through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the many varieties of identity and authority in early literary cultures. Readings may include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Middle English lyrics, The Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and poems by Isabella Whitney, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanyer, John Donne, and George Herbert, among others.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Alastair Minnis
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the seventh through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the many varieties of identity and authority in early literary cultures. Readings may include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Middle English lyrics, The Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and poems by Isabella Whitney, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanyer, John Donne, and George Herbert, among others.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Leslie Brisman
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the eighteenth century through the present. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse genres and social histories; and modernity’s multiple canons and traditions. Authors may include Alexander Pope, William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Gertrude Stein, Gwendolyn Brooks, Elizabeth Bishop, and Derek Walcott, among others. The fall section will include Milton’s Paradise Lost, following the syllabus from previous years.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: R. John Williams
TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Introduction to the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the place of race, class, gender, and sexuality in American literary culture. Authors may include Phillis Wheatley, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O’Connor, Alan Ginsberg, Chang-Rae Lee, and Toni Morrison, among others.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Ben Glaser
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

Introduction to the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the place of race, class, gender, and sexuality in American literary culture. Authors may include Phillis Wheatley, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O’Connor, Alan Ginsberg, Chang-Rae Lee, and Toni Morrison, among others.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Caleb Smith
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Introduction to the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the place of race, class, gender, and sexuality in American literary culture. Authors may include Phillis Wheatley, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O’Connor, Alan Ginsberg, Chang-Rae Lee, and Toni Morrison, among others.

Introductory Classes
American Lit
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Stephanie Newell
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

An introduction to the literary traditions of the Anglophone world in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and historical contexts. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic, cultural and racial histories; and on the politics of empire and liberation struggles. Authors may include Daniel Defoe, Mary Prince, J. M. Synge, James Joyce, C. L. R. James, Claude McKay, Jean Rhys, Yvonne Vera, Chinua Achebe, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, J. M. Coetzee, Brian Friel, Amitav Ghosh, Salman Rushdie, Alice Munro, Derek Walcott, and Patrick White, among others.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Ruth Yeazell
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 168

Introductory Classes
Term: Fall
2017
Professor: Timothy Robinson
TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 168

Introductory Classes
WR, Hu
Term: Fall
2017