Undergraduate Courses

Professor: John Rogers
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Freshman Seminars

A study of the literature of cosmology and cosmogony, from Genesis, Hesiod, Plato, and Lucretius, to Milton, Newton, Swedenborg, Joseph Smith, L. Ron Hubbard, Jorge Luis Borges, and Ursula K. Le Guin.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Freshman Seminars

Interdisciplinary overview of how weather serves as a topic of human imagination and invention across such domains as literature and science, philosophy and religion, painting and popular culture. The stories we tell about weather, the temperamental and nebulous materials of weather, and the media that helps us understand it and shape it. Readings include poems, prose, and academic articles.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Naomi Levine
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Freshman Seminars

This course examines the poetics of loss from the nineteenth century to the present. Our investigation will be guided by two literary approaches to loss: the genre of the elegy and the myth of Orpheus, the poet-singer who descends into the underworld to retrieve his dead beloved. Our readings and viewings will prompt us to address a set of questions: What is the relationship between loss and creativity? Can literary language resurrect or re-kill the dead? Can it freeze or reverse time? What can ghosts tell us about the persistence of the past? What are art’s strategies for representing hurt, and what kinds of consolation can it offer? Is consolation always desirable? Topics include the Victorian cult of death, nostalgia, collective and historical trauma, romantic heartbreak, experimental film, spiritualism and the occult. Course texts will be supplemented by art and archival objects (such as spirit photographs, memento mori jewelry, letters) from the Yale collections.  

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Heather Klemann
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”            —Henry Ford

This course studies the anatomy of big ideas. We can offer only abstract predictions about the future of a world in which machine learning, neural lace, biointelligence, and self-driving cars will become commonplace. Instead, this course asserts that we have much to learn from how scientists, entrepreneurs, and educators argue over such predictions. What makes an idea revolutionary or contrarian in an age when so much knowledge is at our fingertips? How do we speak about that which is yet unknowable? How are narratives about superintelligence composed through disciplines of economics, philosophy, religion, and engineering; the worlds of finance and entrepreneurship; and the concepts of evolution, futurism, and humanism? And what kinds of racial, gender, or class inequalities might superhuman intelligence reinforce or dissolve? Our course materials include peer-reviewed scholarly research, documentary film, and in-class interviews with contemporary entrepreneurs. Throughout the course, we will reflect on what these issues mean for developing our own strategies of reading, writing, and public speaking—what will we really need in a world with superhuman intelligence and with what can we dispense?

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Anusha Alles
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Cannibal, curry-muncher, sugar baby, oreo, white bread, strange fruit. Why is eating so intertwined with modern experiences of racial, gender, and sexual difference? Examining consumption practices, this seminar explores relations between the body, land, labor, and imperial power.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 9:00am-10:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Is there really a separation of Church and State in America? Is religion a private matter? Has modernity marginalized religion? In this course, we will examine the role of religion in the public sphere, and we will challenge our understanding of what it means to be religious in a secular world. According to Charles Taylor, we in the West have come to a point where belief in God is no longer unchallenged and the presumption of unbelief is dominant, especially in intellectual milieus. In spite of the decline in religious belief, however, contemporary debates on marriage and sexuality, gender, and race hinge on notions of religious morality. What might these conversations reveal about the boundary between religion and politics? Is a secular outlook the solution to the challenges of religious diversity in America? We will read essays on these debates in disciplines as varied as law, biology, theology, philosophy, anthropology, and race and gender studies. As we explore the relationship between religion and secularity, we will also be concerned with how religion affects the more intimate aspects of our lives. How does religion constitute our identity and define our relationship to others? How does belief or unbelief influence our sense of purpose and fulfillment? We will examine the tensions, conflicts, and anxieties religion inspires in our public and private lives.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

“Rebellion,” writes Albert Camus, is “more than pursuit of a claim.” When someone rebels, he “demonstrates with obstinacy, that there is something in him which is worth-while” and that implicit in the act of rebellion is a “spontaneous loyalty to certain aspects of himself.” In these times of intensifying political activism, we might think of challenges to authority or dissent as the struggle against oppression, the fight for social justice, or the defense of some ideal. But as Camus suggests, our individual and collective identities are also deeply implicated in the causes we take up. How do discourses of resistance legitimate marginalized identities? In this course, we will seek to understand the ideologies that motivate dissent and how these discourses subvert social, political, and religious orthodoxies. How do embodied contradictions of cultural norms complicate our ideas about race, class, gender, and sexuality? Is dissent always empowering? Drawing from a range of perspectives in disciplines that include psychology, anthropology, sociology, theology, philosophy, critical theory, and performance studies, we will seek to establish how resistant thinking and practice shape identity and culture. These various perspectives will inform our discussions on topics such as colonialism, civil rights, and contemporary movements like Zionism and Black Lives Matter.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Jason Bell
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Do we live in the worst of all possible worlds? If your answer to this question is “yes,” you might be a pessimist. Philosophershave debated for centuries whether human beings are innately good or evil, whether history leads to perfection or descends into madness, and whether life is joy or endless suffering. In 2017, as nuclear superpowers face-off and climate change threatens the biosphere, these ancient questions have gained new urgency. On the side of sorrow, the pessimist sings with Townes Van Zandt, “we all got holes to fill / them holes are all that’s real.” She echoes Voltaire, who writes that we are “born to endure either the convulsions of anxiety or the lethargy of boredom.” Buteven when confronted with misery, a pessimist need not be nihilistic, conservative, depressed, or unhappy. In this course, we consider how pessimism has been an essential if controversial resource for revolutionary politics. We begin by introducing a set of classic debates on pessimism.Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Marx, and Camus all disputed the likelihood of human progress, the relationship of slavery to civilization, and the most ethical means of achieving freedom. The second and third parts of the course concern extensions of those debates into the 21st century. First, we study the Afro-Pessimists, a group of thinkers who believe, in the words of Frank Wilderson III, that the entire world “is sutured by anti-Black solidarity.” We investigate how Afro-Pessimism has shaped arguments about reparations for slavery, black feminism, and science fiction. Then, we look at the place of pessimism in queer life, specifically, the global AIDS crisis, the fight for marriage equality, and decolonization. We will ask, how have pessimists imagined a future free from oppression, if not pain? What value can we find in our lives under such conditions? And perhaps most significantly, where (if it all) can we build a just society in a broken world? 

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Timothy Robinson
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 4:00pm-5:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

What right does any authority have to control expression? This writing seminar will treat legal and critical debates from recent times, as well as various arguments concerning politics, artistic freedom, and religion, ranging from those of Plato to Tipper Gore.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Jami Carlacio
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:00am-10:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Every day, at every hour, we are bombarded by hundreds of news items via traditional broadcast and print outlets, social media sites, blogs, wikis, podcasts, and more. Confronted with so much information, we must decide what news to consume and which source(s) to trust. The stakes are high: what is available to us and on what platforms affect our choices to take (or not take) action, engage in civil protest, vote in key elections, conserve resources, and more. The rapid and radical changes we witness in our news and information environment make public and private decisions even more difficult, particularly in a global context. In a democratic society, the media are expected to create an informed citizenry able to debate issues in the public sphere. But are they doing their job? How might the news manufacture our consent—that is, to what extent do media shape our opinions rather than create the conditions for democracy?

The central questions of this course include: What role do the media play in US democracy? How has news production and consumption changed, with the rise of citizen journalists? Because most of our news now comes to us in digital form, we must ask ourselves, how do digital forms of news production and consumption affect American democracy?

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Jami Carlacio
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Committed not just to their own rights but rather to the greater social good, women in the United States since the nineteenth century have been key players in shaping a democracy. Ignoring resistance to their self-proclaimed authority and right to move from the domestic to the political sphere, they often allied with men in achieving urgent political and social reforms, from abolishing slavery to attaining suffrage, from eradicating exploitative labor practices to gaining civil rights for racial minorities and gays and lesbians. In 2017, the need for social justice is still urgent, and the challenges to their authority nearly as strong. Rising to the occasion, women have led protests and spearheaded movements in order to protect their right to make their own healthcare choices, to challenge laws that inhibit LGBTQIA people’s freedom to express their gender and sexual identity, to change economic and environmental policies that specifically harm disadvantaged people, and to end discriminatory practices that affect primarily racial and ethnic minorities and immigrants. Noteworthy as these efforts are, they have met with varying degrees of success.

Students in this course will grapple with difficult questions such as these: In fighting for equal rights and social justice, to what extent have women really been instrumental, and can their efficacy be measured? How have women responded to gendered challenges to their authority and how have white women in particular responded to race-based criticisms leveled against them in their effort to achieve social and political reform? This writing-intensive course will include work in a digital environment.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Alison Coleman
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

What is family? Who can or cannot constitute a family? How do external forces—ranging from war to social media to the economy—affect families around the globe today? And why have so many writers throughout the ages, whether comedian or critic, philosopher or politician, been inspired to take up the topic? In this writing seminar, we will examine the institution and the concept of family through a range of scholarly lenses including history, law, literature, psychology, and sociology. Taking our cue from the signs and symbols of family that proliferate in the world around us, a selection of academic texts on the subject, and our own experiences as well as the lives of those around us, we will deconstruct the term “family” in an effort to analyze its many facets and implications. Through our writings and in our class discussions, we will ask: How do I define family—and how does family define me?

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Craig Eklund
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 9:00am-10:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

What is the self? Paradoxically, the closest thing to us is the most obscure of all. This course explores the seminal questions of selfhood (free will, subjectivity, consciousness) and novel insights offered by neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and, yes, selfies.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Greg Ellermann
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Today, most of us would accept the claim that art is political. TV shows, movies, music – we assume that such cultural objects can express ideals, make arguments, represent characters in politically significant ways, and even teach us how the world works. But where do our intuitions come from? Do they stand up to scrutiny? Drawing on perspectives from philosophy, political theory, the history of media, black studies, and gender studies, this class explores the uneasy place that artworks occupy on the terrain of the political. To begin, we will consider the status of art in the modern world. How do the economic and technological transformations of modernity change our sense of art’s capabilities? In response to this question, we raise the thorny issue of mass culture and its relation to high art and artistic subcultures. Can art today ever be more than a commodity? What does it mean to create in opposition to the mainstream? We then delve into the ongoing debate about the politics of vision, representation, and the gaze in film and other visual media. We will consider in detail the limits of what art can or should show us, without giving up on the idea that art reveals the world in new and life-altering ways.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: James Ensley
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

What is a book? From papyrus to paperbacks, humans have cataloged their thoughts, desires, mindless scribblings, and greatest works of art in myriad physical forms. Most familiar to us is the ubiquitous form of the book. What, however, makes a reader understand something as a book? Is it the shape and form of the book? Does the author make the book? Or, perhaps the genre gives shape to the book. Does the physical form of the book change our understanding of its contents or even the way we read? How do communities form around books? At stake in these questions is not just what constitutes a book but also how we imagine the process of reading and the ways it is structured both materially and societally.

This course asks you to contemplate and write about what makes a book both materially and textually across a broad historical span, from medieval manuscripts and Victorian serial novels to Harry Potter and steamy romances. Readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines like history, philosophy, sociology, cognitive science, economics, and English, and from a variety of authors like Barthes, Chartier, and Bourdieu among others. Drawing heavily on Beinecke Rare Book Library and British Arts Center resources, this course will ask you to physically interact with material books from a variety of periods and invite you to consider the social and cultural ramifications of how we read these objects. Using these resources, you will begin to formulate your own answers to the question of who or what makes a book.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Seo Hee Im
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 4:00pm-5:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

What compels us to live like Spartans when we could all be hedonists? In this course, you will think and write critically about the commonplace imperative to improve yourself and the world. Topics include the discourse of self-optimization, with its emphasis on education, training, and practice; the rise of occupational burnout; the persistent drive to expand markets abroad and the concomitant return of racism and xenophobia; and extreme pursuits of physical perfection from the cult of CrossFit to detox diets. 

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Timothy Kreiner
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

How do we make sense of social divisions? Why do those divisions seem to have intensified in recent years? And what is to be done about them? This course seeks to shed light on the persistent problem of inequality by querying what we mean when we say equality today. Perhaps most provocatively, we will spend a good deal of time making heretical if corollary inquiries: What if the trouble lies with the notion of equality itself? To do so we will tarry with a few historical touchstones such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Discourse on the Origin of Inequality and the Declaration of Independence. From there we will take up the trouble with equality today in terms of race, gender, sexuality, and class before bringing what we glean to bear upon how the Black Lives Matter movement responds to mass incarceration and the legacy of slavery. We will conclude by examining the rise of the Alt-Right and no-platform campaigns that have reignited debates over free speech on campus here at Yale and elsewhere.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

What is the purpose of college? How should you spend your time while you are here? What roles do institutions of higher education play in our society and what kind of society are they helping to build? Are they succeeding or failing, and for whom? This course considers the variety of purposes with which individuals and institutions might approach the project of higher education: as individual self-cultivation, professional development and credentialing, or training in practices of citizenship, to name a few. Our readings draw from philosophy, political theory, sociology, and educational theory and include the works of Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt, Danielle Allen, bell hooks, Paulo Freire, and Tressie McMillan Cottom.  This course asks you to think critically and imaginatively about the meaning of your own time spent in this institution and then to contextualize your experience – to understand the diverse roles which institutions of higher education have played in American society, their various purposes, functions, and points of access.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

During NFL preseason last year, Colin Kaepernick sat quietly during the national anthem to protest the treatment of African Americans in the United States.  It took two games before anyone noticed; when they did, the responses starkly divided locker rooms, clubhouses, and dinner tables that include the “stick to sports” crowd who imagine sports as an escape from the problems of the world to the those who see politics influencing every aspect of life, even our games. Kaepernick is not the first to use his platform as an athlete to advocate for social change, following in the footsteps of Jackie Robinson and Muhammad Ali. But his choice reminds us that sports are a nexus of values in our culture. In this class, we will think about race and society through our favorite games. From arguments over mascots in Cleveland and Washington, D.C., to questions of masculinity in the NFL, to protest and self-assertion in the WNBA, teams and individuals have added their voice to this conversation for decades. How do sports fit into our social consciousness? What does acceptable protest look like if such a thing is possible? Is celebrity a proper platform to discuss race and social justice? Can our favorite games can teach us more than the fundamentals of skill, technique, and teamwork and perhaps provide a new framework for analyzing our world?

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Pamela Newton
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm

Modern cities challenge us to build communities on a large scale. In this seminar we explore what we want from our cities and what they tell us about ourselves.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:00am-10:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

In the last year, President Donald Trump has planned to deport millions of Mexican Americans and build a multi-billion dollar wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Although Trump’s ideas often seem unprecedented, they are rooted in previous attempts to manage mobile communities, police international boundaries, and define national identities. In this course, we will situate current events in the social, cultural, and environmental histories of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. By drawing on anthropology, geography, philosophy, history, literature, and political science, we will ask and answer a range of questions about this inequitable yet interdependent region: How has the U.S. tried to control indigenous and Mexican territories? How have conquered people and migrants adapted to and influenced their new homes? How have ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, and class operated on both sides of the border? These historical questions will lead us to a range of theoretical inquiries: What are borders—are they physical boundaries, or are they psychosocial conditions? Similarly, what are nations—are they flexible and diverse communities, or are they stable and homogeneous groups? Ultimately, what are human beings—do they have inalienable rights, or can they be labeled as illegal aliens? In a world increasingly divided between citizens and migrants, we will use writing as a form of critical reasoning, cross-cultural understanding, and political debate.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Ittai Orr
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

What are the signs and symptoms of a sick society? What makes society healthy or ill? This course asks you to inhabit the role of social doctor, adept at reading features of societies local and abroad for greater patterns. We will attempt to find the causal roots of addiction and substance abuse, a widening wealth—and health—gap between the richest and poorest humans, the rise of the zombie in pop culture, the phenomenon of freak shows or the invention of soap, to name just a few symptoms. We will examine and assess influential social theories put forward since the Eighteenth Century by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Max Weber, Ferdinand Tönnies, and Sigmund Freud, and debate the advantages and disadvantages of empiricism in assessing social ills, the meaning of realism and idealism in social thinking, models of health, and the pitfalls of critique and social theory. Ultimately, we will take features of contemporary American society we believe indicate illness to formulate our own explanatory theories to be published in a new undergraduate journal of cultural criticism called Diagnosis.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Justin Park
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Do we really need empathy? Is “putting yourself in another’s shoes” the remedy to the political, racial, and economic divisions that fill our headlines and newsfeeds? In 2006, then senator Barack Obama suggested as much when he argued that a “sense of empathy” needs to “infuse our politics.” But is there a limit to what empathy can do? Is putting yourself in another’s place even possible? If it is, whom should we feel empathy for?

We will start with Adam Smith’s influential work on empathy, asking what are empathy’s necessary conditions, along with Achille Mbembe’s work on enmity and society. Then we will move to cognitive science and studies on empathy produced in readers of literary fiction; we will test those claims by reading Recitatif by Toni Morrison. We will examine “empathy-projects”: contemporary works that mobilize a radical engagement with empathy to transform a reader’s position on such issues as trans rights, class politics in the 21st century, neo-liberalism and the commodification of emotion, and the clash between religion and medicine. We will conclude by asking if humans are the only fit subject for empathy. What about animals, the environment, and even machines? We will ask: what does it take for empathy to transform the subject and what are the limits of that transformation? As Anne Fadiman writes, “empathy is so hard – harder than anger, harder than pity.”

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Peter Raccuglia
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Writing about love, like being in love, can make us sloppy thinkers. To love passionately, we are told, is to give oneself over, willingly or not, to the irrational. Love is a subject we associate with poetry and pop songs, not with serious scholarship. This class will ask you to resist that stereotype by thinking critically and writing clearly about love, sex, and intimacy. We will range over some of love’s many histories, theories, psychologies, and biologies, in order to better understand how our culture “makes” love today. We will ask why love hurts with Eva Illouz and doubt love with Judith Butler. We will consider the history of sexuality with Michel Foucault and imagine the future of sex with Emily Witt. We will try to understand what love has to do with the politics of race, gender, sexuality, and empire. And we’ll end by bringing fresh eyes to two of the most powerful meditations on modern love in American culture: Beyoncé’s Lemonade and Barry Jenkins’s Moonlight.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Palmer Rampell
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

In an era pervaded by alarms about the death of privacy, this course asks: Why does privacy matter to us? What are its origins? Does it protect all equally? Topics to be considered include: abortion, digital surveillance, and social media.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Stephanie Ranks
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

What do we risk when we speak out against the state?  If a government or institutional authority can declare anything it doesn’t like to be seditious, is speech really free?  Modern institutions, from governments to corporations to universities, have adopted “sedition” as a term of disapprobation against subjects, workers, and members who engage in protest.  How does the need for a law against speech that incites social and political upheaval square with free speech values and First Amendment rights?  Through contemporary theorists and historical authors, we will consider how radical speech has been punished and restricted over time.  Our conversations will expand into topics as diverse as the ethics of protest, the necessity of investigative journalism, and the consequences – like charges of treason – that make “free speech” such a precarious category.  We will ask who has the right to speak freely, whether speech can constitute a kind of action, and how these thorny issues have been translated into our current political moment.  We will look at how this topic has been treated through a range of lenses: literary critical, historical, legal, political.  And we will ask ourselves how these questions have been mapped onto the recent explosion of free speech debates across college campuses nationwide.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Anna Shechtman
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

What is the avant-garde? Many would answer this question negatively: avant-garde art is not mainstream, not produced for large audiences, and neither conventional nor conservative. In other words, the avant-garde is frequently defined against “mass culture.” The history of cultural production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, however, reveals that mass culture and avant-garde art movements have been in sustained dialogue. Andy Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Cans,” (1962) for example, mimics the graphics of midcentury advertising; Douglas Gordon’s “24 Hour Psycho” (1993) brings Alfred Hitchcock’s Hollywood film into the art gallery. This course explores the creative cross-pollination between mass culture and avant-garde art, examining key concepts in the history of American cultural capital—middlebrow, pop culture, kitsch—along the way. In tracing the historical evolutions of these terms, we will identify the ways in which class, race, gender, and sexuality have informed them. Focusing primarily on visual media — painting, photography, film, and digital images — we will develop a language with which to discuss the history of modern art and consumerism. Ultimately, we will engage with critics and artists whose work has questioned the very definition of art itself.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Alexia Williams
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

The concept of self-love is saturated with personal, political and commercial value—self-care, self-esteem, self-indulge, self-defense, selfish. In her 1988 book of essays A Burst of Light, Audre Lorde famously wrote, “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” In this writing seminar, we examine how self-love is socially and politically constructed in ways that reflect experiences of race in the United States.  What role has self-care played in social resistance movements? What does it mean for people of color to love themselves in the face of institutionalized racial hatred? How do race and ethnicity shape our definitions of self-esteem and our capacities to possess it?  We will engage these questions through a variety of academic disciplines including cultural studies, music theory, political science, psychology, literary criticism, religion and philosophy.  In our era of commodified mindfulness, activist fatigue, the life-changing magic of tidying, minimalism, Oprah, Beyoncé and tea, when is the love of oneself radical?

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Barbara Stuart
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

This class will consider why the Farm Bill, an almost invisible piece of legislation for food policy, has such far-reaching implications and whether the industrial agriculture that feeds our nation has failed us. We will discuss how best to effect change in our food system.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Rasheed Tazudeen
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

How are identities shaped by the sounds and noises we hear? How does sound, and music, influence the construction of our world? This course will investigate the cultural and political role of sound and music from Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo to Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Rasheed Tazudeen
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

While we tend to speak about “life” as a self-evident concept, the meaning of life has been persistently redefined according to historical pressures and philosophical, scientific, and aesthetic ideas. This course explores contestations over the meaning of life from Ancient Greece to the present.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Craig Eklund
Term: Fall
Day/Time: WF 11:35am–12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

The meaning and value of racial, sexual, and political identities are hotly contested in our world today.  Who and what we are, however, does not begin and end with our identification with a group.  We also tend to think of ourselves as possessed of something that is uniquely ours, an intangible thing we call the self.  On the face of it, this idea is as plain as can be (for we all know that we are selves, after all), but, on closer examination, it becomes apparent that the nature of the self is vague and indeterminate.  This course confronts the paradox that the closest thing to us is the most obscure of all.  What is the self?  Over the semester, through works of philosophy, fiction, film, and self-portraiture, we will explore the seminal questions of selfhood: identity, free will, subjectivity, morality, and the nature of consciousness.  We will also take up novel perspectives on the self offered by new disciplines, technologies, and trends, turning to neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and, yes, selfies.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Lukas Moe
Term: Fall
Day/Time: WF 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Movements like Civil Rights capture our imagination with their demands for justice but also with their aesthetics. This seminar asks why we protest in light of how we do it—in meetings, in books, in art, and in the streets.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Lectures

Since its invention, photography has changed humans’ relationships to their environments in unprecedented and irreversible ways.  In this class, we will ask how both writing and photography offer new ways of imagining such fundamental concepts as space and time; nature and technology; race, class, and gender; violence and social change. We will learn how to “read” photographs—and their successors, from digital installation art to social media—for insights into our society’s changing understanding of itself. Lastly, by looking at writing through the “lens” of photography, we will explore the relationship between visual and verbal rhetoric in our contemporary world.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.
 

Professor: Clara Wild
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

After the 2015 mass shooting at Charleston’s Emanuel AME Church, White House spokesman Eric Schultz reiterated President Obama’s belief that the Confederate flag belongs in a museum. What distinction is Schultz making here between monuments and museums? Whose experiences are represented in museums and monuments? And who gets left out? In this course, you will explore how cultural identities and values are expressed, transmitted, and curated through museums and monuments. This course draws readings from a variety of disciplines, including history, law, anthropology, philosophy, and art history and will explore how people have interacted with objects and things foreign to everyday experience from medieval relic collections to Sea World. There will also be a number of opportunities to explore the many museums and monuments throughout New Haven.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Sarah Robbins
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 4:00pm-5:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Is utopia a “good place,” or is it “no place” at all? At what point does social dreaming beget a social nightmare? In this seminar, we will examine texts whose authors are troubled by the hindrances and horizons of utopian thinking.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Timothy Kreiner
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 9:00am-10:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Few social issues are more pivotal today than those that animate the Black Lives Matter movement. Those issues have a long history, however, in art as well as politics. Indeed, the historical devaluation of black life casts a long shadow over the formation of American literature. From the era of slavery to what many theorists view as the racialized expansion of the US prison system in recent decades, black life has been a major if often marginalized force shaping literary history. At the same time, literature has often been a proving ground for competing forms of antiracist politics. This course explores that force and those forms through a broad overview spanning from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass to recent writings by Toni Morrison, Fred Moten, and Claudia Rankine. Along the way we will also take up work by writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, and Amiri Baraka.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Angus Ledingham
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Do you own yourself? How much control do you have over what people know about you? If you open up to a public (large or small), are you are asserting your autonomy or leaving yourself vulnerable? Why do we tell invisible/anonymous strangers things that we would never disclose in an ordinary conversation? In this course we will consider what it means to “give yourself away.” We start by looking at tells – unconscious signals of hidden motives and desires – as they’ve been construed in genres as diverse as psychoanalysis, detective fiction, and nineteenth-century “dramatic monologues.” As the course progresses we will consider the risks people take by exposing themselves to public scrutiny; Western culture’s longstanding anxieties about chastity and its lapses (the fear that one might “give away” one’s virtue); and what it might mean to be truly “self-possessed.” We will hone our skills as critical and attentive readers of literary and cinematic texts, while consistently returning to questions of ethics, sexuality and publicity. Readings include William Shakespeare’s King Lear, Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, Martin Scorsese’s The King of Comedy, and poetry by William Wordsworth, Walt Whitman, Claudia Rankine, and others.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Katja Lindskog
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Game of Thrones tells us that winter is coming – but why is it coming? What causes an entire world’s climate to change? In this seminar, we will read literary texts that provide thought-provoking answers to that question. Moving across a variety of genres, we will see magical forest creatures, coal miners, and post-apocalyptic scavengers work with, and struggle against, their environments in ways that reflect changing attitudes to how we should relate to nature. From Shakespeare and Dickens to today’s bestsellers and disaster movies, fiction helps us see that in our world (unlike in Westeros), structured labor – the way we organize different forms of work – has played a huge part in shaping our environment.

It often seems as if our jobs and prosperity are separate from that of our planet. But what happens to our work when the planet can no longer support us? Do we change how we make our living, in order to save ourselves? With the sinking cities and burning plains of yesterday’s science fiction becoming tomorrow’s reality, can literature help us figure out where to go from here? In class we will ask these questions – and many more – while moving through literary, cinematic, theoretical, and historical texts. We will disagree, agree, persuade, and generally wander in and around these materials to better understand how they are put together. These conversations will provide a model for what literary arguments can look like. We’ll see how fiction bears witness to the ecological emergency produced by our systems of labor – but the works we read will also offer hope; for survival, and for a more just and resilient future.

Though the object of our investigation is literature, this is a writing course above all. We will work together on strategies for pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing. We will also discuss methods of source interpretation, research, and documentation. We will refine the skills inherent in critical writing through a process of radical revision, in which you will learn to read your own and your classmates’ writing with a critical eye, transforming it into a sophisticated, refined, and persuasive final product.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Ryan Wepler
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Can reading good literature make you a good person? Does encountering art that challenges your certainties, broadens your experience, and probes the limits of existence make you more sensitive to your own personhood and the humanity of others? In this course we will consider what makes literature good and how good literature moves us. Our collective goal will not just be to produce a theory of good literature, but to experience its goodness, to develop your capacity to be moved by a literary work and reflect on what happened to you during that process. Readings range from popular successes to great masterpieces and include: Mrs. Dalloway (Woolf), Absalom, Absalom! (Faulkner); short fiction and excerpts by Sir. Arthur Conan Doyle, Mark Twain, Flannery O’Connor, O Henry, Jorge Luis Borges, Kurt Vonnegut, Karen Russell, George Saunders, and E. L. James; selected poetry; and one of the Harry Potter films.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Margaret Deli
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Rosemary Jones
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Susan Hartman
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Briallen Hopper
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Briallen Hopper
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Pamela Newton
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Mark Oppenheimer
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 9:00am-10:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Lynda Paul
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Palmer Rampell
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Barbara Riley
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Adam Reid Sexton
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Kim Shirkhani
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:00am-10:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Kim Shirkhani
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Fred Strebeigh
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Barbara Stuart
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Close reading of great nonfiction prepares students to develop mastery of the craft of powerful writing in the humanities and in all fields of human endeavor, within the university and beyond. Study of some of the finest essayists in the English language, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Leslie Jamison, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, and Virginia Woolf. Assignments challenge students to craft persuasive arguments from personal experience, to portray people and places, and to interpret fundamental aspects of modern culture.

Professor: Andrew Ehrgood
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Randi Epstein
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

ENGL 114, 115, 120, or another writing-intensive course at Yale.

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Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

 

 

Professor: Danielle Chapman
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Professor: Richard Deming
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Professor: Derek Green
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Professor: Brandon Menke
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Development of the basic skills used to create imaginative literature. Fundamentals of craft and composition; the distinct but related techniques used in the three genres. Story, scene, and character in fiction; sound, line, image, and voice in poetry; monologue, dialogue, and action in drama.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the seventh through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the many varieties of identity and authority in early literary cultures. Readings may include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Middle English lyrics, The Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and poems by Isabella Whitney, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanyer, John Donne, and George Herbert, among others.

Professor: Jessica Brantley
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:00am-10:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the seventh through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the many varieties of identity and authority in early literary cultures. Readings may include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Middle English lyrics, The Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and poems by Isabella Whitney, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanyer, John Donne, and George Herbert, among others.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the seventh through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the many varieties of identity and authority in early literary cultures. Readings may include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Middle English lyrics, The Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and poems by Isabella Whitney, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanyer, John Donne, and George Herbert, among others.

Professor: Alastair Minnis
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the seventh through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the many varieties of identity and authority in early literary cultures. Readings may include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Middle English lyrics, The Faerie Queene, Paradise Lost, and poems by Isabella Whitney, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanyer, John Donne, and George Herbert, among others.

Professor: Leslie Brisman
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the English literary tradition through close reading of select poems from the eighteenth century through the present. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse genres and social histories; and modernity’s multiple canons and traditions. Authors may include Alexander Pope, William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Gertrude Stein, Gwendolyn Brooks, Elizabeth Bishop, and Derek Walcott, among others. The fall section will include Milton’s Paradise Lost, following the syllabus from previous years.

Professor: R. John Williams
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the place of race, class, gender, and sexuality in American literary culture. Authors may include Phillis Wheatley, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O’Connor, Alan Ginsberg, Chang-Rae Lee, and Toni Morrison, among others.

Professor: Ben Glaser
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the place of race, class, gender, and sexuality in American literary culture. Authors may include Phillis Wheatley, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O’Connor, Alan Ginsberg, Chang-Rae Lee, and Toni Morrison, among others.

Professor: Caleb Smith
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

Introduction to the American literary tradition in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and in diverse historical contexts. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic and social histories; and the place of race, class, gender, and sexuality in American literary culture. Authors may include Phillis Wheatley, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O’Connor, Alan Ginsberg, Chang-Rae Lee, and Toni Morrison, among others.

Professor: Stephanie Newell
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

An introduction to the literary traditions of the Anglophone world in a variety of poetic and narrative forms and historical contexts. Emphasis on developing skills of literary interpretation and critical writing; diverse linguistic, cultural and racial histories; and on the politics of empire and liberation struggles. Authors may include Daniel Defoe, Mary Prince, J. M. Synge, James Joyce, C. L. R. James, Claude McKay, Jean Rhys, Yvonne Vera, Chinua Achebe, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, J. M. Coetzee, Brian Friel, Amitav Ghosh, Salman Rushdie, Alice Munro, Derek Walcott, and Patrick White, among others.

Students who wish to enroll in this seminar should participate in online preregistration, which opens at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 23 and closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017.

Professor: Ruth Yeazell
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes
WR, Hu

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 168

Professor: Timothy Robinson
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35pm-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Introductory Classes

The genre of tragedy from its origins in ancient Greece and Rome through the European Renaissance to the present day. Themes of justice, religion, free will, family, gender, race, and dramaturgy. Works include Homer’s Iliad and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, and Soyinka. Focus on textual analysis and on developing the craft of persuasive argument through writing.

Also LITR 168

Professor: Emily Skillings
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 4:00pm-5:15pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing

This course combines elements of seminar and workshop and invites students to deepen their knowledge of poetic forms, movements, and styles, with the goal of strengthening their voices through equal parts reading and writing poetry. Over the course of the semester, we will study specific aspects of craft, such as line, line breaks, stanzaic choices, meter, form, image, metaphor, and sound, broadening and developing our range of expression, linguistic elasticity, comfort with risk-taking, formal innovation, and writer’s “toolkits.” As we read and investigate a wide scope of both canonical and contemporary poets—from Shakespeare to Harryette Mullen—with an eye toward craft, we will experiment with their architectures and formal choices in our own poetry. Students will develop a portfolio of poems (including odes, sonnets, list poems, ekphrastic poems, and other constraint-based forms) and write an accompanying essay on the craft of poets who have influenced their work.

This course is open to all students, but freshmen and sophomores are especially welcome.

No advance application is required for this course.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 10:30am-11:20am
Course Type: Lecture & 1 HTBA/Lectures

This course considers the deep concerns that digital media raise.  Digital media not only take us into uncharted waters: they also raise the most basic problems of complex societies and cast the oldest troubles of civilization into relief.  They inspire ancient human questions about life, death, time, and meaning.  Every new medium raises existential questions, and in our age, new media do so at both the individual, the societal, and the species level.  Our task will be to understand how digital media reconfigure—and do not reconfigure–the oldest textures of the human condition.  We will do so by surveying both a diverse array of approaches in the philosophy of media and a wide range of current topics.  Students will write a book review (6-8 pages), an original research paper (10-12) pages, and engage in short exercises in connection with the weekly discussion section.   No background in philosophical or technical fields is required.

Also FILM 210.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12.50pm +HTBA
Course Type: Lecture & 1 HTBA/Lectures
Pre-1800 Lit, Renaissance

Love, sex, gender, society, and theater practice in Shakespeare’s comic genres, from the early farces and romantic comedies to the problem plays and late romances.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 9:25am-11:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

This course places African American literary texts within their archival context, examining how texts were planned, composed, revised, and received in their time. Each class meeting will pair a text or texts with archival materials from Beinecke Library, including manuscripts, correspondence, photographs, and ephemera. Students will gain an understanding of archival organization and how archival materials can be placed in conversation with published work by examining published and unpublished texts as well as scholarly uses of archival materials. Readings will include Lorraine Hansberry, Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, Jean Toomer, and Richard Wright.

Also AFAM 212.

SYLLABUS

Professor: Jill Campbell
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Construction of race and gender in literatures of Great Britain, North America, and the Caribbean from the late seventeenth to the early nineteenth century. Focus on the role of literature in advancing and contesting concepts of race and gender as features of identity and systems of power, with particular attention to the circulation of goods, people, ideas, and literary works among regions. Some authors include Aphra Behn, Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, Leanora Sansay, Maria Edgeworth, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Mary Shelley. First of a two-term sequence; each term may be taken independently.

Also WGSS 223

Professor: Marta Figlerowicz, Professor: Ayesha Ramachandran
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Lecture & 1 HTBA/Lectures

Using literary and cultural history as tools of critical thinking, we invite students to grapple with “the self” as an object of intellectual inquiry. Beginning with an overview of some major philosophic frameworks for understanding selfhood in the Western tradition, from antiquity to the present, the course examines in detail three foundational ways in which the self has been defined in the modern world: in terms of gender, race/religion, and class. We will discuss a variety of historical sources–including plays, novels, poems, films, legal documents, and philosophical treatises, from Europe, America, the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia–to help students develop a more sophisticated understanding of these critical vocabularies and frameworks. Questions we will address include, but are not limited to, the following: how do current debates about transgender identity echo the fluid gender identities in early modern love lyric? How are medieval ideas of community implicated in current debates over terrorism and “otherness”? What can ancient texts on sexuality tell us about intimate relations in the digital future?

This class will involve a combination of lectures and creative or debate-style group work in which students will have the chance to engage with these issues, and use the tools we introduce them to, in more direct and interactive ways.

Also LITR319/ER&M225/HUMS402

Professor: Sarah Mahurin
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Examination of the intersections between African American and Southern literatures, with consideration of the ways in which the American South remains a space that simultaneously represents and repels an African American ethos.

Also AFAM 206

Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

This course is on the representation of animal life and consciousness in works of literature and also an introduction to the emerging field of critical animal studies. We will pose such questions as: What have non-human animals meant for Western and non-Western cultures? How do poetry and fiction attempt to represent the experience of animals by asking us to inhabit their sensations or emotions or thoughts? How has philosophy understood our moral obligation to animals? In the broadest sense, what role do animals play in our aesthetic, ethical, political, and scientific worlds? We will read fiction, poetry, philosophy, and critical theory, and we will discuss animal sentience and experience, vegetarianism, animal fables, pet keeping, animals alongside disability, race, and gender, and the representation of animal life in the visual arts.

Also EVST 237

Professor: Alan Burdick
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 2:30pm-4:20pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing

Exploration of ways in which the environment and the natural world can be channeled for literary expression. Reading and discussion of essays, reportage, and book-length works, by scientists and non-scientists alike. Students learn how to create narrative tension while also conveying complex—sometimes highly technical—information; the role of the first person in this type of writing; and where the human environment ends and the non-human one begins.

Professor: Amity Gaige
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 3:30pm-5:20pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Readings and experimental exercises will lead to the completion of a short story.  This course is a workshop, centered around in-depth discussion of both published literature and student-written fiction.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.g., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

 
Professor: R. Spargo
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 3:30pm-5:20pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing

An intensive introduction to the craft of fiction, designed for aspiring creative writers. Focus on the fundamentals of narrative technique and peer review.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.g., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

Professor: Louise Glück
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing

A seminar workshop for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Yale. Preference given to freshmen and sophomores.

Admission to writing courses is by application and is based chiefly on work submitted by the student.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.g., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

Special application instructions: Students should submit a sample of their own work, if it exists; in addition, all applicants should submit a paragraph on a literary work of any kind, any period: the choice should reflect personal admiration.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing

A workshop on journalistic strategies for looking at and writing about contemporary paintings of the human figure. Practitioners and theorists of figurative painting; controversies, partisans, and opponents. Includes field trips to museums and galleries in New York City.

No advance application is required for this course.

Also HSAR 460.

Professor: Leslie Brisman
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Introduction to the work of Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats, with some attention to Byron, to the poets’ own problematic revisions, and to the minor poets of this rich period of poetic innovation and revolutionary spirit.

Term: Fall
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

This course will consider how the Victorian novel treats the world of political action.  If the novel is in part a form that renders the epic deeds of warfare in an up-to-date, realistic medium, then the arena of politics is in some ways its quintessential manifestation, representing the modern, moderate solution to the kinds of progress that used to be achieved through arms.  Yet politics often occupy a marginal place in the novels of the day.  We will look at how techniques of the novel tackle the difficult subject of government.  How can a novelist describe the piecemeal action of legislation, whether through elections or acts of parliament?  What’s the relationship between such subjects and descriptions of more epic deeds in these works (revolutions, duels, etc.)?  What role is given to women and to the courtship plot in political novels?  Can politicians ever be heroic?

As we ask such questions, we will also be considering some of the important political issues and events of the period, such as the Reform Acts, the Irish Question, the Woman Question, and the Condition of England.  We will engage with a wide variety of critical sources, both Victorian and contemporary.

Professor: Naomi Levine
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

This course explores forms of love and desire in Victorian literature, with attention to their philosophical, historical, and aesthetic contexts. We will begin with the hypothesis that nineteenth-century ideas about love were shaped by encounters with literature and visual art. Victorians found models of desire in the adulterous kiss of Dante’s Paolo and Francesca and the vampiric gaze of Leonardo’s Mona Lisa, in Sappho’s fragments and Shakespeare’s sonnets – but also in the bodily experiences of reading books and contemplating art. As we move from the end of romanticism to the fin-de-siècle, we will ask the following questions: How did the pleasures of reading and looking influence nineteenth-century aesthetics? How did history license or constrain the Victorian erotic imagination? How does desire drive a range of literary genres (the sonnet sequence, the sensation novel, the love letter, aestheticist prose)? Authors include Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, William Morris, Christina Rossetti, Walter Pater, Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), Michael Field, and Oscar Wilde, with additional readings in Hegel, Stendhal, and Freud. Visits to the Yale art collections will inform our discussions.

Professor: Katie Trumpener
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Exploration of turn-of-the-century European attempts to craft modernist lives: how new ideas of women’s roles, childhood, and the family shaped modernist literature and art—even as modernist designers tried to change people’s experience of daily surroundings. Topics include a range of New Woman novels, modernist design, fashion, and stage sets, exemplary artists’ houses (Carl and Karen Larson, Vanessa and Duncan Grant), reform fashions, portraits and family portraits, experimental fiction, memoirs (Andrej Bely, Walter Benjamin, Joyce, Woolf), and children’s books as designs for living. Students will have the opportunity to research in modernist periodicals or contribute to the upcoming Beinecke Text/Textile exhibit.

Also LITR 204

Professor: Joseph North
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

An extended inquiry into the political implications of theorizing emotions and sensibilities in different ways. Broad engagement with key thinkers from a number of different traditions, including European philosophy, British literary criticism, and contemporary poetry.

Also HUMS 406

Professor: R. John Williams
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

A survey of literature’s role in anticipating and constructing potential futures since 1887. Early Anglo-American and European futurism during the years leading up to World War I; futures of speculative fiction during the Cold War; futuristic dreams of contemporary cyberpunk. What literature can reveal about the human need to understand both what is coming and how to respond to it.

Professor: Joseph Roach
Term: Fall
Day/Time: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Classical rhetoric, from Demosthenes to the digital age: the theory and practice of persuasive public speaking and speech writing.

Open to junior and senior Theater Studies majors, and to nonmajors with permission of the instructor.

Also THST 291

Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 9:00am-10:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Examination of black women’s literary texts, with a focus on the post–civil rights era. Exploration of the ways writers construct and contest the cultural, ideological, and political parameters of black womanhood. Topics include narrative strategy, modes of representation, and textual depictions of the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, color, ethnicity, nationality, class, and generation. Texts placed within the context of black women’s literary legacies.

Also AFAM 279/AMST 273/WGSS 342

Professor: Charles Musser
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 7:00pm-9.00pm T 3:30pm-5:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

The history of novels and films about Hollywood. Ways in which the closely related forms of novel and film portray “the dream factory”—its past, present, and future—as well as the way the forms interact. Books include Merton at the Movies (1922), I Should Have Stayed Home (1938), Loves of the Last Tycoon (1940), and The Player (1988). Films include What Price Hollywood? (1932), A Star is Born (1937), Sunset Boulevard (1950), In a Lonely Place (1950), and The Player (1992).

May not be taken after AMST S321/FILM S180.

Also FILM 476
 

Professor: Joseph Cleary
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 9:25am-11:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

An examination of a variety of different modes of fiction developed across the twentieth century by writers from several continents as they have engaged with the immediate actualities and long aftermaths of European and American imperial involvements in Ireland, the West Indies, Africa and Asia. The focus will be on modernist, realist, romance, epic and historical narrative forms and on their cross-fertilization and critical possibilities. Authors to be discussed may include Joseph Conrad, Thomas Mann, James Joyce, C. L. R. James, Doris Lessing, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’oMarguerite Duras, Monique Truong, Amitav Ghosh, Joseph O’Neill and Ronan Bennett.

Student Performance: Students are expected to attend class punctually, to be well-prepared, to contribute regularly and meaningfully to discussions, and to be constructively engaged in the ways that make for good seminars. You will also be required to submit two or three questions in advance of some of the classes in order to facilitate class discussion and to sharpen and develop ideas prior to discussions. Writing for this course involves completing two essays (12-15 pages each). No final exam.

Key Texts:

Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (1899)

Joseph Conrad, Nostromo (1904)

Thomas Mann, Death in Venice (1912)

James Joyce, Dubliners (1914)

James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916)

C. L. R. James, The Black Jacobins (1938)

Doris Lessing, The Grass is Singing (1950)

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, A Grain of Wheat (1967)

Marguerite Duras, The Lover (1984) 

Monique Truong, The Book of Salt (2003)

Joseph O’Neill, Netherlands (2008)

Ronan Bennett, The Catastrophist (1997)

Also LITR 314.

Professor: James Berger
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Examination of how people with disabilities are represented in U.S. literature and culture. Ways in which these representations, along with the material realities of disabled people, frame society’s understanding of disability; the consequences of such formulations. Various media, including fiction, nonfiction, film, television, and memoirs, viewed through a wide range of analytical lenses.

Also AMST 406

Professor: Anthony Reed
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Survey of major twentieth-century Caribbean poets such as Derek Walcott, Kamau Brathwaite, and Aimé Césaire.

Also AFAM 338/LITR 280

Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

This course is designed to look at issues of faith through the lens of poetry.  With some notable exceptions, we will concentrate on modern poetry—that is, poetry written between 1850 and 2017.  Inevitably we will also look at poetry through the lens of faith, but a working assumption of the course is that a poem is, for a reader (it’s more complicated for a writer), art first and faith second.  You may want to challenge this assumption.  The entire course may end up being a challenge to this assumption.

“Faith” in this course does not necessarily mean Christianity, though that will inevitably be the context for reading many of the poems, given that Christianity is so important to the history of poetry in English.  But we will also engage with poems from other faith traditions, as well as with poems that are wholly secular and even adamantly anti-religious.

The reading in this course is intensive rather than extensive.  You will need to read every poem many times.  You will need to memorize at least one of them and parts of others.  We will read a wide variety of poets but usually only 1-3 poems from each of them.

You will also be expected to read select critical pieces, all by poets.  These are primarily to serve as examples of some of the ways that recent poets have thought about their art in relation to faith and culture, but they are also intended to give you some models for your final paper.  I will explain this carefully in class.

Also RLST 233/HUMS 253

Professor: Jill Richards
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Survey of young adult fiction across the twentieth century, with a focus on American writers. Topics include environmental apocalypse, biopolitics, youth indebtedness, juvenile sentencing, sexual violence, and racial profiling. Creative and critical writing components.

Professor: Jill Richards
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 9:25am-11:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Historical survey of feminist and queer theory from the Enlightenment to the present, with readings from key British, French, and American works. Focus on the foundations and development of contemporary theory. Shared intellectual origins and concepts, as well as divergences and conflicts, among different ways of approaching gender and sexuality.

Also LITR 426/WGSS 340

Professor: Marc Robinson
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Seminars

Examination of modernist principles as they are adapted to, and tested in, American theater. Playwrights include Eugene O’Neill, Gertrude Stein, e. e. cummings, Djuna Barnes, Mae West, Thornton Wilder, Tennessee Williams, Jane Bowles, and Frank O’Hara.

Also THST 355/AMST 366

Professor: Caryl Phillips
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars

A study of literature that responds to a changing post–World War II Britain, with attention to the problem of who “belongs” and who is an “outsider.” Authors include Alan Hollinghurst, Kazuo Ishiguro, Colin McInnes, Samuel Selvon, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, and John Osborne.

Meets during reading period.

Professor: Stephanie Newell
Term: Fall
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars

This course approaches the study of African cities and urbanization through the medium of diverse texts, including fiction, non-fiction, graphic narratives and the arts, as well as scholarly work on African cities. Through these cultural “texts,” attention will be given to everyday conceptualizations of the body and the environment, as well as to theoretical engagements with the African city. We will study urban relationships as depicted in literature and popular media in relation to Africa’s long history of intercultural encounters, including materials dating back to the early twentieth century. With attention to these historical texts as well as to recent materials, the course will ask:

  • In what different ways is the city produced in African literature and popular culture, and how do these representations engage with prevailing models in African urban studies?
  • What theoretical lenses and interdisciplinary models of analysis are available to scholars to examine African city texts?
  • What social, political and economic questions are posed by African texts?

Requirements: Students are expected to attend all seminar meetings, to make substantive contributions to seminars. Written assignment: for Seniors if this course is fulfilling a writing requirement: one final paper of 25-30 pp (double-spaced, due Dec 11); for all other students, the option of 1 x mid-term (due Oct 23) and 1 x final paper (due Dec 11), each of 12-15pp (double-spaced).

Core Texts (alphabetical order):

Chris Abani, GraceLand (1st edn 2004; Picador, 2014) - $8.95

Marguerite Abouet and Clément Oubrerie, Aya (Jonathan Cape, 2007) – out of print: plenty of copies second-hand on Amazon $1.97

Peter Abrahams, Mine Boy (1st edn. 1946; Heinemann, 1989) - $12.95

Brian Chikwava, Harare North (Vintage, 2010) - $12.95

Cyprian Ekwensi, Jagua Nana (1st edn. 1961; Heinemann, 1987; Yale University Library online book)

Okey Ndibe, Foreign Gods Inc (Soho Press, 2014) - $15.95

Deji Olukotun, After the Flare (The Unnamed Press, release: Sept 2017) - $16.95

Ivan Vladislavic, Double Negative (And Other Stories, 2013) - $15.95

Zoe Wicomb, You Can’t Get Lost in Cape Town (The Feminist Press at CUNY, 2000) - $16.95

Total cost of books if purchased new: approx. $125.00

SYLLABUS

Also AFAM 446/AFST 424.

Professor: Joseph Roach
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars

      “There are certain cities and certain areas of certain cities where the official language is dreams.  Venice is one.  And Paris.  North Beach in San Francisco. Wencelaus Square in Prague.  And New Orleans, the city that dreams stories.”

—Andrei Codrescu, “Se Habla Dreams,” from New Orleans, Mon Amour (2006)

Se habla dreams” (Spanglish for “dreams are spoken here”) is Codrescu’s concise way of summing up what many writers have discovered and readers have experienced over the last two-hundred years:  NOLA dreams stories, and it also bleeds them.  As tangibly real as any place can be—ask anyone who has lived there—the Crescent City is at the same time an imaginative creation of the stories it has dreamed and the performances that act them out.  Typically implausible, the truth about NOLA can often best be told by masquerades, while even just remembering the food can make you gain weight.  But bad dreams are also spoken here, and over two centuries New Orleans has made certain truths about America more cruelly visible than any other city has done, despite the lively competition.

Literature and Performance in New Orleans will take up some of the representative works of imaginative literature and cultural performance that have generated the idea of “New Orleans” in the minds of readers and audiences world-wide.  Drawing on readings from major American authors and first-hand accounts of spiritual and secular performances, the seminar will explore the sources of creative inspiration that artists find in NOLA, including its cultural mystique, its colonial history, its troubled assimilation into Anglo-North America, its tortured racial politics, its natural and built environment, its spirit-world practices, its raucous festive life, its eccentric characters, its food, its music, its queer vibe, its predisposition to catastrophe, and its capacity for re-invention and survival.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 9:25am-11:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars

Nonhuman life forms in fiction and poetry from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first, including plants and animals, monsters and viruses, intelligent machines, and extraterrestrial aliens. The complexity and variety of nonhuman ecology.

Also AMST 344/AMST 723/ENGL 833

Professor: Alastair Minnis
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars

A study of Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess, House of Fame, and Legend of Good Women, in addition to substantial selections from his Canterbury Tales. The texts’ relations to the discourses of dissent current in Chaucer’s day, an age of extreme political, social, and intellectual turmoil.

Professor: Ben Glaser
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 9:25am-11:15am
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars

Introduction to major movements and figures of modern poetry with emphasis on formal innovation, avant gardes, and the relation to poetic tradition. Poets include Yeats, Frost, Eliot, Pound, Moore, Stevens, H.D., Hughes, Brown, and Williams.

Professor: James Berger
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars

Are the Humanities obsolete? Or were they obsolete even before they were formed? Plato disparaged any study that could not demonstrate clearly its own truth and moral validity–which ruled out the arts and any philosophy that allowed for skepticism and uncertainty. Since then, the Humanities and Liberal Arts have been attacked and defended. More recent attacks have focused on the Humanities’ alleged lack of technological acumen and economic utility, its presumed moral relativism, and its ideological tendencies toward the Left (or, at other times, toward the Right). How then can these studies and artistic pursuits–criticized as both anti-modern and postmodern, epistemologically and morally dubious, economically worthless, and politically harmful–defend themselves? In an era of alleged economic scarcity, when all public funds must be rigorously accounted for and a robust return is expected for all investments, when the prevailing values are those of finance, entrepreneurship, and technical innovation, how can the Humanities justify themselves as worthy of study and funding? What other values might they invoke? Or can they only present themselves as adjuncts of the dominant ideology, arguing, for instance, that a degree in English will help toward career in law or business?  This course will examine these debates, from Plato’s Academy to today’s corporate university.

Also AMST 414

Professor: Margaret Homans
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm-2:15pm
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars

A study of the major novels and other writings by Virginia Woolf, with additional readings in historical contexts and in Woolf biography and criticism. Focus on Woolf’s modernist formal experimentation and on her responses and contributions to political movements of her day, principally feminism and pacifism; attention also to the critical reception of her work, with emphasis on feminist and queer literary criticism and theory.

Also WGSS 426

Professor: Donald Margulies
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 2:30pm-5:00pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Creative Writing

A seminar and workshop in writing for the stage. Readings include modern American and British plays by Pinter, Mamet, Churchill, Kushner, Williams, and Wilder. Emphasis on play structure, character, and conflict. In addition to weekly exercises, students write a one-act play.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.g., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

Special application instructions: Your Writing Sample may be in any genre; there is no limit to the length of your Statement of Purpose.

Also THST 320.

Professor: Fred Strebeigh
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 1:30pm-4:00pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Creative Writing

Course No: ENGL 454a

Course Title: Nonfiction Writing: Voice and Structure

Instructor: Fred Strebeigh

Th 1:30-4:00

A nonfiction workshop, confronting the challenges of journalism as an art. Emphasis on voice and structure in long-form, reportorial  nonfiction. Study of texts that may suggest modes, voices, forms, and styles for nonfiction pieces. Frequent writing projects and revisions.

English 454 (Non-Fiction Writing: Voice and Structure) concentrates on voice, structure, and style in the shaping of non-fiction reportage.  Workshops and discussions explore techniques by which writers may mold intractable fact into enduring literature.  Readings include reportage by writers such as Joan Didion, Atul Gawande, John Hersey, John McPhee, Jessica Mitford, Susan Orlean, Michael Pollan, Mark Twain, John Updike, Tom Wolfe, and Virginia Woolf.

Students in the course will build, starting with proposals and drafts, to the creation of at least two polished pieces, typically with word lengths from 3000 to 5000 words.  The best information for this course, including links to past work by students, is on the web at <http://engl454.coursepress.yale.edu/> (available via Yale login).

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.g., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

Here are opportunities to add strength to an English 454 application:

Writing samples:

In the space where the application form asks students to paste “a writing sample of … about 4500 words of prose,” feel free to paste up to two pieces of any length (and even a third if its length is a page or less, such as a piece for Daily Themes).  Strong applications often include some of the following:  Reportorial work that has been published on campus or professionally.  Innovative play with structure or voice, in any genre of writing.  Nonfiction writing for at least one and often both of the two samples.  Guidance by the author, particularly when samples are long, about where to look for the greatest strengths.

Proposals for work to write this term:

Applicants for this course are invited to look at past work for this course and, by using that work as an indicator for what this course gives students an opportunity to create, to offer preliminary proposals for writing in the coming term.  Work written by past students, much of it published soon after taking this course, is available via the English 454 Reader at <http://engl454.coursepress.yale.edu/>. Strong proposals in past have referred to previous student pieces as models for future ones. 

A proposal might include, for example, information such as this: “Much as Sarah Stillman immersed herself in the anti-sweatshop movement for her piece ‘Made by Us’ <http://engl454.coursepress.yale.edu/sarah-stillman-made-by-us/>, I hope to immerse in _____ ; whereas Stillman used a hasty November trip to Florida to report one important scene, I have already done my reporting in _____ and have taken notes that guarantee the accuracy of my writing. My piece will prove surprising and significant because ____ .” (As this phrasing suggests, the course is open to some past reportage, although much reporting will occur during the term.) In the form provided by the English department, proposals may be pasted after writing samples.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 9:25am-11:15am
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Creative Writing

Advanced non-fiction workshop in which students write about science, medicine, and the environment for a broad public audience. Students read exemplary work, ranging from newspaper articles to book excerpts, to learn how to translate complex subjects into compelling prose.

Admission by permission of the instructor only. Applicants should email the instructor at carl@carlzimmer.com with the following information:

1. One or two samples of nonacademic, nonfiction writing. (No fiction or scientific papers, please.) Indicate the course or publication, if any, for which you wrote each sample.

2. A note in which you briefly describe your background (including writing experience and courses) and explain why you’d like to take the course.

Professor: Louise Glück
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 3:30pm-5:20pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Creative Writing

A seminar and workshop in the writing of verse. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.g., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

Note: This class WILL MEET for the first time on Labor Day, Monday, September 4.

Professor: Caryl Phillips
Term: Fall
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Creative Writing

An advanced workshop in the craft of writing fiction. May be repeated for credit with a different instructor.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.g., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

Professor: Cynthia Zarin
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 3:30pm-5:20pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Creative Writing

A seminar and workshop in the contemporary essay. Public versus private voice, the responsibilities of the essayist, and the evolution of writing in the first person. Readings include essays by Joan Didion, Jonathan Lethem, Jenny Diski, Zadie Smith, M. F. K. Fisher, Bruce Chatwin, John Berger, and Oliver Sacks.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.g., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

Professor: Steven Brill
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 9:00-10:50
Course Type: Workshop/Journalism, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Journalism

ENGLISH 467A: JOURNALISM
Steven Brill ● sb@brillbusiness.com ● (212) 332-6301
Fall 2017

DESCRIPTION:  This seminar – the core course for Yale Journalism Scholars – is for those interested in understanding the changing role of journalism, in coming to grips with the challenges and opportunities related to the business model of journalism in a digital, global age, and in learning the practice of journalism. Grades will be based on participation and written work, with an emphasis on the final project.

An emphasis will be placed on both imaginative and critical thinking as it applies to reporting and to creating ways and forms of telling a story so that it has maximum impact in a world cluttered with media and experiencing profound challenges to making journalism economically viable.

One or perhaps two extra (and voluntary) sessions will take place in New York City, so that students can meet with working journalists there.

I will meet with each student individually during the term as often as necessary in order to provide feedback, help with the final project, and (if requested) provide career guidance.

Guest instructors during two of the sessions will be Bob Woodward, Jill Abramson and a variety of successful journalists who took this seminar in prior years. 

Successful completion of this course and other aspects of the Yale Journalism Scholars program will qualify students to be designated Yale Journalism Scholars. For more information on the Yale Journalism Scholars and the Yale Journalism Initiative, see http://writing.yalecollege.yale.edu/journalism-initiative.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS:  The seminar is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. In general, we are looking for a range of students – some with demonstrated commitment to and experience in journalism, others without that background but who can write well, want to learn, and perhaps have an added dimension to offer in class discussions (such as an intense interest in politics, the arts, law, or economics), which they might want to apply to journalism.

Admission:

Each student must submit the following simple, two-part application package to sb@brillbusiness.com. I prefer that you submit the package by the evening of Monday, September 4, 2017.

If you want to submit your application earlier, you can submit it any time after August 15 – and in some cases I will admit students early who do so. If there are 15 well qualified applicants from among those applying early, I will send notice that the application process has closed as soon as it has.

However, if you first want to visit the introductory class on Friday, September 1 (which is the substitute for the regular Monday class because of Labor Day), that is fine.

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN by 11:59 PM on Monday, September 4.  I will post with the English Department the final list of those accepted by Wednesday, September 6, if not earlier.

The two-part application should consist of:

  1. No more than two double-spaced pages: A written statement explaining your interest in the class and in the Yale Journalism Scholars program. This should also include your Yale class year, any previous writing courses that you have taken, a brief description of your extra-curricular activities and a description of your journalism experience.
  1. One writing sample – either an article that you have published in an on- or off- campus publication or something that you submitted for a class.

 _____________________________________________________________________________

Printable version

SYLLABUS

Also PLSC 253.

Professor: Anne Fadiman
Term: Fall
Day/Time: Th 2:30pm-5:20pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Creative Writing

A seminar and workshop with the theme “At Home in America.” Students consider the varied ways in which modern American literary journalists write about place, and address the theme themselves in both reportorial and first-person work.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

Please read the description below, paying special attention to sections highlighted in bold, some of which describe exceptions to the standard application procedure.

The purpose of this course is to examine and attempt good nonfiction writing through the microcosm of setting. How do we see America (whether urban or rural, east or west, rich or poor) as home? We will attempt to dismantle some of the traditional barriers between academic reading and pleasure reading as we discuss works by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Joan Didion, Ian Frazier, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, John McPhee, and others. Students will write four pieces (two first-person, two reportorial), the last of which is a substantial profile reported in New Haven, outside the Yale campus, on someone found in the Greater New Haven Yellow Pages. They will also critique each other’s work both orally and via email. Each student will have at least six individual conferences with me, most of them an hour long, to discuss and edit his or her work.

English 469 has no prerequisites, which means that you may apply even if you have no reporting experience. I’m more interested in the grace of your writing style and the sound of your voice. The class is usually a mix of seasoned journalists and creative writers. Fiction writers, playwrights, and essayists bring valuable gifts to our table. Though most 469ers have been juniors and seniors, I have accepted an occasional sophomore. Graduate students shouldn’t apply (sorry); freshmen should wait.

Students who wish to apply to English 469 should submit the standard Application for Writing Courses on the English Department Website by noon on Wednesday, August 16.  Please note the following special instructions for English 469 applications:

1. The standard application specifies “a” writing sample. Ignore that! I can assess your work better if you submit two samples, totaling about 5-15 double-spaced pages. (The total length may exceed that, but if it does, please mark the sections to which I should pay particular attention.) You may even submit three samples if one is very short (for instance, a Daily Themes one-pager, in which case please note the prompt).

2. If possible, your samples should belong to the same genre we’ll be reading and writing (“non-non”–nonacademic nonfiction). Essays, literary journalism, and personal essays would all be appropriate. (If fiction is your strength, one but not both of your samples may be a short story. Similarly, if you’re a playwright, one sample may be a scene from a play. The other sample should be non-non.) Be sure to choose pieces that give your literary style a thorough airing.

3. Your “statement of purpose” should be a note to me that explains some things your samples don’t. The application suggests “a paragraph,” but you are welcome to write as long a note as you wish. For instance: Why do you want to take the class? What would you contribute to it? What writing experience and honors have you accumulated? (I’ll still consider you if the answer is None and None.) What are you majoring in? (English majors will receive no special preference.) Is there anything else that might help me understand you as a writer or a person? Your note need not be conventional; it should sound like you.

If you have questions about English 469 before you apply, or after you hear about admission and are wondering if it’s the right class for you, you’re welcome to write me (anne.fadiman@yale.edu). Two veterans of last year’s class have also volunteered to field them. Elena Saavedra Buckley (elena.saavedrabuckley@yale.edu) came to 469 with reporting experience; Mae Mattia (mae.mattia@yale.edu) came from a creative writing background but survived without difficulty.

Admitted students will be notified about a week before the first class. Please be ready to respond with a yea or nay so that wait-listers can be swiftly admitted. The roster will be complete (and brief reading assigned) before the first class on August 31.

Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Course Type: Independent/Creative Writing, /Independent Projects

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 6, 2017 for spring-term projects and by April 20, 2018 for fall-term projects.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application Form

Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Course Type: Independent/Creative Writing, /Independent Projects

A writing tutorial in fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, or nonfiction for students who have already taken writing courses at the intermediate and advanced levels. Conducted with a faculty member after approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 6, 2017 for spring-term projects and by April 20, 2018 for fall-term projects.

Prerequisites: two courses in writing.

Application Form

Professor: John Crowley, Professor: John Rogers
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars, /Creative Writing, Course Type: Workshop/Senior Seminars, /Creative Writing, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Senior Seminars, /Creative Writing

Utopian writings as a form of fiction. Students read and discuss major utopian fictions and conceive, propose, and write a utopia of their own. Readings from Plato and Thomas More to H. G. Wells and Ursula LeGuin.

Senior Seminar or Creative Writing Workshop. No advance application required.

Professor: John Crowley, Professor: John Rogers
Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Seminar/Senior Seminars, /Creative Writing, Course Type: Workshop/Senior Seminars, /Creative Writing, Course Type: Advanced Workshop/Senior Seminars, /Creative Writing

Utopian writings as a form of fiction. Students read and discuss major utopian fictions and conceive, propose, and write a utopia of their own. Readings from Plato and Thomas More to H. G. Wells and Ursula LeGuin.

Senior Seminar or Creative Writing Workshop. No advance application required.

Term: Fall
Day/Time: W 1:30pm-3:20pm
Course Type: Workshop/Creative Writing

The writer’s work is making sentences. Everything else is secondary. But too often our intentions blind us to the sentences we are actually making, or we feel that, somehow, form or genre is more important than the sentence itself. This workshop will scrutinize your nonfiction prose, looking for the opportunities, the energy, the clarity that may be lying hidden there. We’ll be aided by many other writers—Auden, Didion, McPhee, Baldwin, Joseph Roth, Kapuscinski, Dillard, Oates, etc. We’ll be thinking about writing as an act of discovery and the sentence as the smallest unit of perception. That means we’ll be using your writing. I’ll expect you to be writing new each week for this course, and we’ll all be reading each others’ work every week as we go through the semester. The goal is quite simply to clarify the act of discovering sentences and, in doing so, discovering the better writer within you.

Not open to freshmen.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains a statement of purpose and a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

Professor: Sarah Stillman
Term: Fall
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-4:00pm
Course Type: Workshop, Course Type: Advanced Workshop

A feature-writing workshop in the reporting and writing of memorable long-form magazine narratives. Close readings of exemplary investigative works. Emphasis on reporting strategies and storytelling tools for interviewing diverse subjects, generating suspense, crafting scenes, and reconstructing events through use of human and non-human sources.

Fall application due by noon on August 16.

After completing the online APPLICATION FORM, upload one Word or Adobe PDF document that contains your name, the course number (e.g., ENGL 245), instructor’s name, a statement of purpose, a writing sample of approximately 5-10 pages or up to 4500 words of poetry, double-spaced. For the statement of purpose, please write a paragraph about why you wish to take this specific writing course. The file should be named with the course number and your name (Sample: ENGL 245_Sayers-Erica.pdf).

Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Course Type: Independent/Independent Projects

Special projects set up by the student in an area of particular interest with the help of a faculty adviser and the director of undergraduate studies, intended to enable the student to cover material not otherwise offered by the department. The course may be used for research or for directed reading, but in either case a term paper or its equivalent is normally required. The student meets regularly with the faculty adviser. To apply for admission, a student must submit an application and prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the office of the director of undergraduate studies.

Applications are due by December 6, 2017 for spring-term projects and by April 20, 2018 for fall-term projects.

Application Form

Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Course Type: Independent/Creative Writing, /Independent Projects

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by Thursday, April 12, 2018 for fall-term projects.

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for the complete program description, project guidelines, and application form.

Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Course Type: Independent/Creative Writing, /Independent Projects

A term-long project in writing, under tutorial supervision, aimed at producing a single longer work (or a collection of related shorter works). An application and prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the office of the director of undergraduate studies by Thursday, April 12, 2018 for fall-term projects.

Visit http://yalecreativewriting.yale.edu/writing-concentration for the complete program description, project guidelines, and application form.

Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Course Type: Independent/Independent Projects

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 6, 2017 for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term and by April 20, 2018 for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application Form

For one-term senior essays, the essay itself is due in the office of the director of undergraduate studies according to the following schedule: (1) end of the fourth week of classes: five to ten pages of writing and/or an annotated bibliography; (2) end of the ninth week of classes: a rough draft of the complete essay; (3) end of the last week of classes (fall term) or end of the next-to-last week of classes (spring term): the completed essay. Consult the director of undergraduate studies regarding the schedule for submission of the yearlong senior essay.

Term: Spring , Term: Fall
Course Type: Independent/Independent Projects

Second term of the optional yearlong senior essay. Students may begin the yearlong essay in the spring term of the junior year, allowing for significant summer research, with permission of the instructor. After ENGL 490.

Students wishing to undertake an independent senior essay in English must apply through the office of the director of undergraduate studies. Applications are due by December 6, 2017 for spring-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the spring term and by April 20, 2018 for fall-term essays or for yearlong essays beginning in the fall term.

Application Form

Professor: Traugott Lawler
Term: Fall
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
Course Type: Seminar/Graduate Seminars

The essentials of the language and mastery of core vocabulary, then close study of a number of lovely short poems. By the end of the semester students should be ready to tackle Beowulf in the spring. Texts: Peter Baker, Introduction to Old English, 3rd edition and Stephen Barney, Word-hoard.

Also LING 500.