Faculty Bookshelf

English Faculty Publications

Listed by Publication Date

Joseph Cleary
December 2001
The history of partition in the twentieth century is one steeped in controversy and violence. Literature, Partition and the Nation State offers an extended study of the social and cultural legacies of state division in Ireland and Palestine, two regions where the trauma of partition continues to...
Donald Margulies
December 2001
Award-winning playwright Donald Margulies is “literate and intellectually stimulating” (New York) and “a playwright of the most unusual imaginative power” (New York Post). Luna Park: Short Plays and Monologues collects Margulies’s best short plays and monologues spanning three decades. Taken as a...
John Durham Peters
December 2001
Communication plays a vital and unique role in society-often blamed for problems when it breaks down and at the same time heralded as a panacea for human relations. A sweeping history of communication, Speaking Into the Airilluminates our expectations of communication as both historically specific...
David Kastan
October 2001
This book is a authoritative account of Shakespeare’s plays as they were transformed from scripts to be performed into books to be read, and eventually from popular entertainment into the centerpieces of the English literary canon. Kastan examines the motives and activities of Shakespeare...
Harold Bloom
October 2001
Information is endlessly available to us; where shall wisdom be found?” is the crucial question with which renowned literary critic Harold Bloom begins this impassioned book on the pleasures and benefits of reading well. For more than forty years, Bloom has transformed college students into...
Alastair Minnis
June 2001
The Roman de la Rose was a major bestseller–largely due to its robust treatment of “natural” sexuality. This study concentrates on the ways in which Jean de Meun, in imitation of Ovid, assumed the mock-magisterium (or mastership) of love. Alastair J. Minnis considers allegorical versus ...
Claudia Rankine
April 2001
In her third collection of poems, Claudia Rankine creates a profoundly daring, ingeniously experimental examination of pregnancy, childbirth, and artistic expression. Liv, an expectant mother, and her husband, Erland, are at an impasse from her reluctance to bring new life into a bewildering world...
David Bromwich
March 2001
Skeptical Music collects the essays on poetry that have made David Bromwich one of the most widely admired critics now writing. Both readers familiar with modern poetry and newcomers to poets like Marianne Moore and Hart Crane will relish this collection for its elegance and power of discernment....
Louise Glück
March 2001
Since, 1990, Louise Glück has been exploring a form that is, according to poet Robert Hass, her invention. Vita Nova - like its immediate predecessors, a book-length sequence - combines the ecstatic utterance of The Wild Iris with the worldly dramas elaborated in Meadowlands. Vita Nova is a book...
Stephanie Newell
January 2001
This is a study of the “unofficial” side of African fiction — the largely undocumented writing, publishing, and reading of pamphlets and paperbacks — which exists outside the grid of mass production. Stephanie Newell examines the popular fiction of Ghana produced since the 1930s, analyzing the...
Anne Fadiman
November 2000
Anne Fadiman is–by her own admission–the sort of person who learned about sex from her father’s copy of Fanny Hill, whose husband buys her 19 pounds of dusty books for her birthday, and who once found herself poring over her roommate’s 1974 Toyota Corolla manual because it...
Ruth Yeazell
September 2000
Fascinating and mysterious, the idea of the harem long captured the imagination of the West. The Muslim practice of concealing the women of the household from the eyes of alien men tempted Europeans to extravagant projections of their own wishes and fears. This intriguing book examines the art that...
Verlyn Klinkenborg
August 2000
Straight West is a book of ninety exquisite and moving black and white photographs about the deep interior of the American West, a place whose people are defined by their relations to animals and the land. The country of Straight West is enormous, stretching from the Mexican border to Montana, but...
John Crowley
August 2000
So it is for Pierce Moffett, would-be historian and author, who has moved from New York to the Faraway Hills, where he seems to discover―or rediscover―a path into magic, past and present. And so it is for Rosie Rasmussen, a single mother grappling with her mysterious uncle’s legacy and her...
Bob Woodward
June 2000
A New York Times Notable Book of the Year Twenty-five years ago, after Richard Nixon resigned the presidency, Gerald Ford promised a return to normalcy. “My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over,” President Ford declared. But it was not. The Watergate scandal, and the remedies...
Donald Margulies
April 2000
Dinner with Friends is a funny yet bittersweet examination of the married lives of two couples who have been extremely close for dozens of years. Although it seems to be treading on familiar ground, Dinner keeps changing its perspective to show how one couple’s breakup can have equally devastating...
Paul Fry
March 2000
This edition of Coleridge’s classic Romantic poem reprints the 1798 and 1817 texts along with critical essays, newly commissioned or revised for students, that read “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” from 5 contemporary critical perspectives: reader response, Marxist, psychoanalytic,...
Michael Cunningham
January 2000
In The Hours, Michael Cunningham, widely praised as one of the most gifted writers of his generation, draws inventively on the life and work of Virginia Woolf to tell the story of a group of contemporary characters struggling with the conflicting claims of love and inheritance, hope and despair....
Michael Warner
November 1999
Michael Warner, one of our most brilliant social critics, argues that gay marriage and other moves toward normalcy are bad not just for the gays but for everyone. In place of sexual status quo, Warner offers a vision of true sexual autonomy that will forever change the way we think about sex, shame...
David Bromwich
November 1999
Essayist, lecturer, and radical pamphleteer, William Hazlitt (1778-1830) was the greatest of English critics and a master of the art of prose. This book is a superb appreciation of the man and his works, at once a revaluation of the aesthetics of Romanticism and a sustained intellectual portrait....
Cynthia Zarin
September 1999
Small for his age, Wallace always wears a fireman’s hat so he won’t be lost in a crowd, but when his legs start growing out of proportion to his body, his mother is told by old Nanny Heppleweather that the hat must come off.
Marc Robinson, Editor
September 1999
“If art is to inspire us, we must not be too eager to understand. If we understand too readily, our understanding will, most likely, be meaningless. It will have no consequences. We must be patient with ourselves.” – Maria Irene Fornes Edited by Marc Robinson, this casebook gathers new...
Harold Bloom
September 1999
A landmark achievement as expansive, erudite, and passionate as its renowned author, this book is the culmination of a lifetime of reading, writing about, and teaching Shakespeare.  Preeminent literary critic-and ultimate authority on the western literary tradition, Harold Bloom leads us through a...
David Kastan
July 1999
The most familiar assertion of Shakespeare scholarship is that he is our contemporary. Shakespeare After Theoryprovocatively argues that he is not, but what value he has for us must at least begin with a recognition of his distance from us.
Michael Warner
March 1999
The sermon is the first and most enduring genre of American literature. At the center of the Puritan experience, it continued in succeeding centuries to play a vital role—as public ritual, occasion for passion and reflection, and, not least, popular entertainment. The fifty-eight sermons collected...
James Berger
March 1999
 In this study of the cultural pursuit of the end and what follows, Berger contends that every apocalyptic depiction leaves something behind, some mixture of paradise and wasteland. Combining literary, psychoanalytic, and historical methods, Berger mines these depictions for their weight and...
Margaret Homans
January 1999
Queen Victoria was one of the most complex cultural productions of her age. In Royal Representations, Margaret Homans investigates the meanings Victoria held for her times, Victoria’s own contributions to Victorian writing and art, and the cultural mechanisms through which her influence was...
David Bromwich
November 1998
Although we know him as one of the greatest English poets, William Wordsworth might not have become a poet at all without the experience of personal and historical catastrophe in his youth. In Disowned by Memory, David Bromwich connects the accidents of Wordsworth’s life with the originality of his...
Donald Margulies
October 1998
The highly acclaimed new play by the author of Sight Unseen and The Model Apartment.
Michael Denning
September 1998
Mechanic Accents is a widely acclaimed study of American popular fiction and working-class culture. Combining Marxist literary theory with American labor history, Michael Denning explores what happened when, in the nineteenth century, working people began to read cheap novels and the “fiction...
Robert Stepto
September 1998
Blue as the Lake maps out an African-American landscape unique in American literature. From Idlewild, the black resort on Lake Michigan where he vacationed as a child with his grandparents, to Oak Bluffs on Martha’s Vineyard, Robert Stepto traces a history of generations finding and making a...
Cynthia Zarin
September 1998
Dido, Peter, Lulu, and others exercise their senses–seeing a walking stick, hearing the ice cream man, yelling, “Daddy!,” and dreaming in their sleep–in a vivid celebration of the many ways children see the world around them.
John Rogers
May 1998
John Rogers here addresses the literary and ideological consequences of the remarkable, if improbable, alliance between science and politics in seventeenth-century England. He looks at the cultural intersection between the English and Scientific Revolutions, concentrating on a body of work created...
Caryl Phillips
April 1998
A German Jewish girl whose life is destroyed by the atrocities of World War II … her uncle, who undermines the sureties of his own life in order to fight for Israeli statehood … the Jews of a 15th-century Italian ghetto . . Othello, newly arrived in Venice … a young Ethiopian...
Hilton Als
January 1998
A New York Times Notable Book Daring and fiercely original, The Women is at once a memoir, a psychological study, a sociopolitical manifesto, and an incisive adventure in literary criticism. It is conceived as a series of portraits analyzing the role that sexual and racial identity played in the...
David Quint
January 1998
In a fresh reading of Montaigne’s Essais, David Quint portrays the great Renaissance writer as both a literary man and a deeply engaged political thinker concerned with the ethical basis of society and civil discourse. From the first essay, Montaigne places the reader in a world of violent...
Edward Ball
January 1998
Slaves in the Family is the story of one man’s exploration of his family’s slave-owning past and his search for the descendants of the people his ancestors kept as slaves. In 1698, Elias Ball traveled from his home in Devon, England to Charleston, South Carolina to take possession of his...
Annabel Patterson
November 1997
While the term “liberalism” was not applied to political thought or political parties in England until the late eighteenth century, the author argues that its central ideas were formulated by seventeenth-century English writers in defiance of their society’s norms, and then transmitted to the...
Anne Fadiman
September 1997
When three-month-old Lia Lee Arrived at the county hospital emergency room in Merced, California, a chain of events was set in motion from which neither she nor her parents nor her doctors would ever recover. Lia’s parents, Foua and Nao Kao, were part of a large Hmong community in Merced,...
Cynthia Zarin
September 1997
Rose is frightened by the strange noises emanating from the apartment upstairs, until she and her mother pay a visit to the noisy young boy who lives there.
Katie Trumpener
May 1997
This magisterial work links the literary and intellectual history of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Britain’s overseas colonies during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries to redraw our picture of the origins of cultural nationalism, the lineages of the novel, and the literary...
Langdon Hammer
May 1997
This edition features over three hundred letters, selected to best illustrate the complexity and textures of Hart Crane’s turbulent life –– from family pressures, to his creative ambition, to his homosexuality.
Louise Glück
May 1997
In an astonishing book-length sequence, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Louise Gluck interweaves the dissolution of a contemporary marriage with the story of The Odyssey. Here is Penelope stubbornly weaving, elevating the act of waiting into an act of will; here, too, is a worldly Circe, a divided...
Harold Bloom
April 1997
Harold Bloom’s The Anxiety of Influence has cast its own long shadow of influence since it was first published in 1973. Through an insightful study of Romantic poets, Bloom puts forth his central vision of the relations between tradition and the individual artist. Although Bloom was never the...
Michael Warner
November 1996
The English Literatures of America redefines colonial American literatures, sweeping from Newfoundland and Nova Scotia to the West Indies and Guiana. The book begins with the first colonization of the Americas and stretches beyond the Revolution to the early national period. Many texts are...
Joseph Roach
April 1996
The colorful handmade costumes of beads and feathers swirl frenetically, as the Mardi Gras Indians dance through the streets of New Orleans in remembrance of a widely disputed cultural heritage. Iroquois Indians visit London in the early part of the eighteenth century and give birth to the “...
Marc Robinson, Editor
March 1996
Drawing from essays, letters, journals and memoirs, this collection includes writers ranging from Thomas Mann to Joseph Brodsky. –Reed Business Information, Inc. © 1996
Louise Glück
December 1995
Winner of the 1993 PEN/Martha Albrand Award for First Non-Fiction, Proofs and Theories is an illuminating collection of essays by Louise Glück, whose most recent book of poems, The Wild Iris, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. Glück brings to her prose the same precision of language, the same...
Harold Bloom
September 1995
“Heroically brave, formidably learned… The Western Canon is a passionate demonstration of why some writers have triumphantly escaped the oblivion in which time buries almost all human effort. It inspires hope… that what humanity has long cherished, posterity will also.” –The New York Times Book...
Paul Fry
July 1995
This book argues that literature can be defined―pragmatist and historicist arguments notwithstanding―and that in its definition its unique value can be discovered. The author identifies literature ontologically as a sign of the preconceptual, as the “ostensive moment” that discloses neither the...