Faculty Bookshelf

English Faculty Publications, Listed by Publication Date

Braving Home book cover
June 2004
Funny, moving, and utterly unique, Braving Home introduces us to five unforgettable modern American pioneers. When Jake Halpern was a cub reporter, he became obsessed with stories about “some outlandish and often hellish place inhabited by a handful of stalwarts who refused to leave.” His fellow...
May 2004
This collection of essays and speeches by Richard H. Brodhead addresses issues of importance to institutes of higher learning and to those who participate in them. As the popular Dean of Yale College from 1993 to 2004, Brodhead was involved in every aspect of undergraduate education - curriculum,...
April 2004
By turns, an elegy, a celebration, and a social history, The Last Fine Time is a tour de force of lyrical style. Verlyn Klinkenborg chronicles the life of a family-owned restaurant in Buffalo, New York, from its days as a prewar Polish tavern to its reincarnation as George & Eddie’s, a...
Harold Bloom
March 2004
In Harold Bloom’s New York Times bestselling Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, the world’s foremost literary critic theorized on the authorship of the historic play Hamlet. In this engaging new stand-alone work, he offers a full and warmly personal account of the play itself,...
James Berger, Editor
March 2004
  The Story of My Life, a remarkable account of overcoming the debilitating challenges of being both deaf and blind, has become an international classic, making Helen Keller one of the most well-known, inspirational figures in history. Originally published in 1903, Keller’s fascinating memoir...
Janice Carlisle
February 2004
Who smells? Surveying nearly eighty novels written in the 1860s to answer that impolite question,Common Scents provides a new reading of Victorian values, particularly as they assess the relative merits of men and women, spirit and matter. In depictions of comparative encounters, the commonplace...
January 2004
Always Albert hopes for rain. On rainy days Mrs. Crabtree takes him with her for taxi rides. So much better than walks. One day – brilliantly sunny, for a surprise – Albert hops a taxi alone. More than one taxi, actually. You will never guess where he goes!
December 2003
A comprehensive collection of Whitman’s most beloved works of poetry, prose, and short stories When Walt Whitman self-published Leaves of Grass in 1855 it was a slim volume of twelve poems and he was a journalist and poet from Long Island, little-known but full of ambition and poetic fire. To...
October 2003
Introducing us to America’s first gay ministers and first female priests, hippie Jews and folk-singing Catholics, Oppenheimer demonstrates that this was an era of extraordinary religious vitality. Drawing on a rich range of archival material as well as interviews with many of the protagonists...
Steven Brill
September 2003
The critics unanimously agree that brilliant, award-winning reporter and bestselling author Steven Brill has written a powerful and sweeping narrative of the country in the first year of the September 12 era. As “the pages flutter” – marvels one critic – “in a race to learn the rest of...
Marie Borroff
August 2003
Literary critic, poet and philologist as well as medievalist, with a particular interest in the powers and effects of poetic language, Marie Borroff brings the full range of her expertise to bear on problems of central importance in the poetry of Chaucer and his nameless contemporary, the Gawain...
July 2003
Bush at War reveals in stunning detail how an untested president with a sweeping vision for remaking the world and war cabinet members often at odds with each other responded to the September 11 terrorist attacks and prepared to confront Iraq. Woodward’s virtual wiretap into the White House...
March 2003
A novel of tremendous scope and beauty, The Translator tells of the relationship between an exiled Russian poet and his American translator during the Cuban missile crisis, a time when a writer’s words – especially forbidden ones – could be powerful enough to change the course of...
March 2003
Dorothy is a retired schoolteacher who has recently moved to a housing estate in a small village. Solomon is a night-watchman, an immigrant from an unnamed country in Africa. Each is desperate for love. And yet each harbors secrets that may make attaining it impossible.With breathtaking assurance...
January 2003
Why do we so often speak of books as living, flourishing, and dying? And what is at stake when we do so? This habit of treating books as people, or personifying texts, is rampant in postwar American culture. In this bracing study, Amy Hungerford argues that such personification has become pivotal...
December 2002
The hugely admired author of “The Last Fine Time” preserves and makes new the sights, smells, sounds, and poetry of country living. Klinkenborg reveals the beauty of the American landscape, not from a scenic overlook, but through a screened-in porch or from the window of a pickup driving down an...
Edward Ball
November 2002
The Sweet Hell Inside is the four-generation saga of the fascinating Harleston family of South Carolina, the progeny of a Southern gentleman and his slave, who rise from the ashes of the Civil War, cast off their blemished roots, and create a cultural dynasty during the 1920s Jazz Age. Charter...
Harold Bloom
October 2002
“If readers are to come to Shakespeare and to Chekhov, to Henry James and to Jane Austen, then they are best prepared if they have read Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear, Robert Louis Stevenson and Rudyard Kipling,” writes Harold Bloom in his introduction to this enchanting and much-needed anthology of...
Harold Bloom
October 2002
What is genius? It is the trait, says Harold Bloom, of standing both of and above an age, the ancient principle that recognizes and hallows the God within us, and the gift of breathing life into what is best in every living person. Now, in a monumental achievement of scholarship, America’s...
August 2002
In this celebration of one of America’s oldest towns (incorporated in 1720), Michael Cunningham, author of the best-selling, Pulitzer Prize–winning The Hours, brings us Provincetown, one of the most idiosyncratic and extraordinary towns in the United States, perched on the sandy tip at the...
Claude Rawson
August 2002
We are obsessed with ‘barbarians’. They are the ‘not us’, who don’t speak our language, or ‘any language’, whom we depise, fear, invade and kill; for whom we feel compassion, or admiration, and an intense sexual interest; whose innocence or vigour we aspire to, and who have an...
July 2002
“… a book that will break new ground in African cultural studies…. [it] will appeal not only to literary scholars but also to social historians and cultural anthropologists.” ―Karin Barber Focusing on the broad educational aims of the colonial administration and missionary societies,...
March 2002
Louise Glück has long practiced poetry as a species of clairvoyance. She began as Cassandra, at a distance, in league with the immortal; to read her books sequentially is to chart the oracle’s metamorphosis into unwilling vessel, reckless, mortal, and crude. The Seven Ages is Glück’s...
February 2002
In her third book of poetry, her first in eight years, Cynthia Zarin, one of the finest poets of her generation, has turned her art to fresh purposes. Taking up the subject of divorce and the splintering and re-forming of family that follows it, Zarin, whose work has been compared to that of...
February 2002
Ardis Butterfield examines the relationship between the poetry and music of medieval France. Beginning when French song was first set into writing in the early thirteenth century, Butterfield describes the wide range of contexts in which secular songs were quoted and copied. Including narrative...
Stephanie Newell
February 2002
Readings in African Popular Fiction explores the social, political, and economic contexts of popular narratives by bringing together new and classic essays by important scholars in African literature and eight primary texts. Excerpts from popular magazines, cartoons, novellas, and moral and...
December 2001
Communication plays a vital and unique role in society-often blamed for problems when it breaks down and at the same time heralded as a panacea for human relations. A sweeping history of communication, Speaking Into the Airilluminates our expectations of communication as both historically specific...
December 2001
The history of partition in the twentieth century is one steeped in controversy and violence. Literature, Partition and the Nation State offers an extended study of the social and cultural legacies of state division in Ireland and Palestine, two regions where the trauma of partition continues to...
December 2001
Award-winning playwright Donald Margulies is “literate and intellectually stimulating” (New York) and “a playwright of the most unusual imaginative power” (New York Post). Luna Park: Short Plays and Monologues collects Margulies’s best short plays and monologues spanning three decades. Taken as a...
October 2001
This book is a authoritative account of Shakespeare’s plays as they were transformed from scripts to be performed into books to be read, and eventually from popular entertainment into the centerpieces of the English literary canon. Kastan examines the motives and activities of Shakespeare...
Harold Bloom
October 2001
Information is endlessly available to us; where shall wisdom be found?” is the crucial question with which renowned literary critic Harold Bloom begins this impassioned book on the pleasures and benefits of reading well. For more than forty years, Bloom has transformed college students into...
June 2001
The Roman de la Rose was a major bestseller–largely due to its robust treatment of “natural” sexuality. This study concentrates on the ways in which Jean de Meun, in imitation of Ovid, assumed the mock-magisterium (or mastership) of love. Alastair J. Minnis considers allegorical versus ...
April 2001
In her third collection of poems, Claudia Rankine creates a profoundly daring, ingeniously experimental examination of pregnancy, childbirth, and artistic expression. Liv, an expectant mother, and her husband, Erland, are at an impasse from her reluctance to bring new life into a bewildering world...
March 2001
Since, 1990, Louise GlÜck has been exploring a form that is, according to poet Robert Hass, her invention. Vita Nova - like its immediate predecessors, a book-length sequence - combines the ecstatic utterance of The Wild Iris with the worldly dramas elaborated in Meadowlands. Vita Nova is...
David Bromwich
March 2001
Skeptical Music collects the essays on poetry that have made David Bromwich one of the most widely admired critics now writing. Both readers familiar with modern poetry and newcomers to poets like Marianne Moore and Hart Crane will relish this collection for its elegance and power of discernment....
January 2001
This is a study of the “unofficial” side of African fiction — the largely undocumented writing, publishing, and reading of pamphlets and paperbacks — which exists outside the grid of mass production. Stephanie Newell examines the popular fiction of Ghana produced since the 1930s, analyzing the...
Anne Fadiman
November 2000
Anne Fadiman is–by her own admission–the sort of person who learned about sex from her father’s copy of Fanny Hill, whose husband buys her 19 pounds of dusty books for her birthday, and who once found herself poring over her roommate’s 1974 Toyota Corolla manual because it...
Ruth Yeazell
September 2000
Fascinating and mysterious, the idea of the harem long captured the imagination of the West. The Muslim practice of concealing the women of the household from the eyes of alien men tempted Europeans to extravagant projections of their own wishes and fears. This intriguing book examines the art that...
August 2000
Straight West is a book of ninety exquisite and moving black and white photographs about the deep interior of the American West, a place whose people are defined by their relations to animals and the land. The country of Straight West is enormous, stretching from the Mexican border to Montana, but...
August 2000
So it is for Pierce Moffett, would-be historian and author, who has moved from New York to the Faraway Hills, where he seems to discover―or rediscover―a path into magic, past and present. And so it is for Rosie Rasmussen, a single mother grappling with her mysterious uncle’s legacy and her...
June 2000
A New York Times Notable Book of the Year Twenty-five years ago, after Richard Nixon resigned the presidency, Gerald Ford promised a return to normalcy. “My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over,” President Ford declared. But it was not. The Watergate scandal, and the remedies...
Donald Margulies
April 2000
Dinner with Friends is a funny yet bittersweet examination of the married lives of two couples who have been extremely close for dozens of years. Although it seems to be treading on familiar ground, Dinner keeps changing its perspective to show how one couple’s breakup can have equally devastating...
March 2000
This edition of Coleridge’s classic Romantic poem reprints the 1798 and 1817 texts along with critical essays, newly commissioned or revised for students, that read “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” from 5 contemporary critical perspectives: reader response, Marxist, psychoanalytic,...
Michael Cunningham
January 2000
In The Hours, Michael Cunningham, widely praised as one of the most gifted writers of his generation, draws inventively on the life and work of Virginia Woolf to tell the story of a group of contemporary characters struggling with the conflicting claims of love and inheritance, hope and despair....
David Bromwich
November 1999
Essayist, lecturer, and radical pamphleteer, William Hazlitt (1778-1830) was the greatest of English critics and a master of the art of prose. This book is a superb appreciation of the man and his works, at once a revaluation of the aesthetics of Romanticism and a sustained intellectual portrait....
November 1999
Michael Warner, one of our most brilliant social critics, argues that gay marriage and other moves toward normalcy are bad not just for the gays but for everyone. In place of sexual status quo, Warner offers a vision of true sexual autonomy that will forever change the way we think about sex, shame...
Harold Bloom
September 1999
A landmark achievement as expansive, erudite, and passionate as its renowned author, this book is the culmination of a lifetime of reading, writing about, and teaching Shakespeare.  Preeminent literary critic-and ultimate authority on the western literary tradition, Harold Bloom leads us through a...
Edited by Marc Robinson
September 1999
“If art is to inspire us, we must not be too eager to understand. If we understand too readily, our understanding will, most likely, be meaningless. It will have no consequences. We must be patient with ourselves.” – Maria Irene Fornes Edited by Marc Robinson, this casebook gathers new...
September 1999
Small for his age, Wallace always wears a fireman’s hat so he won’t be lost in a crowd, but when his legs start growing out of proportion to his body, his mother is told by old Nanny Heppleweather that the hat must come off.
July 1999
The most familiar assertion of Shakespeare scholarship is that he is our contemporary. Shakespeare After Theoryprovocatively argues that he is not, but what value he has for us must at least begin with a recognition of his distance from us.